Opportunities

English Department Student Prizes

Below is information about the prizes which require submissions.  They are open to Barnard students of ALL majors.  The FIRM DEADLINE for submissions is Monday, Feb. 17th, 2014 at 4pm.  Any questions should be addressed to Dr. Timea Szell, Director of Creative Writing, at: tszell(at)barnard(dot)edu.

For information about Columbia's writing prizes (some of which are open to Barnard students), visit their page on Columbia's website

2014 Prize Descriptions

2014 Peter S. Prescott Prize for Prose Writing

This prize is offered annually by the family of the distinguished writer and critic Peter S. Prescott, author of Child Savers and former book critic of Newsweek.  Competition is open to all Barnard undergraduates of whatever department or major.  This year's prize is $300.  The prize will be awarded at the discretion of a board of three outside judges for a work in prose, fiction or creative non-fiction, which gives the greatest evidence of creative imagination and sustained ability.  Each of the three judges, acting independently, is asked to designate his or her first, second, and third choice among the contestants.  In the final reckoning, each first choice will count as three points, second choice as two points, and third as one point.  The contestant with the highest number of points will be the winner.  In any year, however, the judges may decline to designate the choices if none of the work submitted seems to them good enough to deserve the prize.  In that event, Mr. Prescott's family and the English Department will determine how the prize money may be spent to encourage creative talent among undergraduate writers at Barnard.

Deadline: Entries in the contest must be turned in absolutely no later than 4:00 p.m. on Monday, February 17th, at the English Department office, 417 Barnard Hall.  As this deadline is final, students would be well advised to set a somewhat earlier deadline in order to forestall emergencies.

Rules:

1. Students are required to submit four copies of each entry, each set labeled with the author's name, email address, expected year of graduation, a list of the contents, and each securely enclosed in a manila folder or envelope.  Every envelope or folder should be labeled on the outside as well with the student's name and a list of contents.  Do not use heavy binders.

2. Typescripts should be double-spaced, on one side only of standard 8-1/2" by 11" sheets.

3. Each separate essay or story must carry the student's name, and the pages of each must be numbered.

4. You may submit one short story or piece of creative non-fiction, or several shorter such pieces, totaling 10-15 pages, and no more than 20.

5. Please retain copies of your work as these entries will not be returned.

Important note: Past winners of cash awards in the writing competition may enter again; their entries, however, should be composed of new material.

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2014 Poetry Prizes

The Leonore Marshall Poetry Prize

This prize was established on a permanent basis by the New Hope Foundation in memory of Leonore Marshall, the writer and peace activist who had given the prize annually for many years before her death.  Besides the prize money, the winner receives Latest Will, Leonore Marshall's collected poems.  Each of three judges, acting independently, is asked to designate a first, second, and third choice among the contestants.  In the final reckoning, each first choice will count as three points, second choice as two points, and third as one point.  The contestant with the highest number of points will be the winner.

The Amy Loveman Prize

This prize was established by friends and Barnard classmates of the late Amy Loveman, long-time editor of the Saturday Review and a key figure for many years in the Book-of-the-Month Club.  The award is for "the best original poem by a Barnard undergraduate."  The Barnard English Department judges this contest.

Helen Searcy Puls Prize

For the best poem in any of the above competitions.

Instructions for poetry prizes:

All three competitions are open to Barnard undergraduates of whatever department or major.  It is suggested that each competitor submit more than one poem, but no more than five.  There can be no fixed statement about the number of lines required; contestants may find it helpful to think of approximately 100 lines, but they should not hesitate to submit fewer or more.  The student should provide four separate and complete sets of manuscripts, each set labeled with her name, expected year of graduation, and a list of the contents, and each securely enclosed in a manila folder or envelope.  Each separate poem within the set must also carry the writer's name.  Pages must be numbered. Typescripts should be on one side only of standard 8-1/2" x 11" pages.  Clear photocopies are acceptable.  Every envelope or folder should be labeled with the student's name and a list of contents.  Do not use heavy binders.

A single entry of four sets of manuscripts will be considered for all four prizes.  Entries in the contest must be submitted absolutely no later than 4 p.m. on Monday, February 17th, at the English office, Room 417, Barnard Hall

Please retain copies of your work as these entries will not be returned.  Copies of this notice may be obtained in 417 Barnard Hall.  Past winners of cash awards in the poetry competitions may enter again; their entries, however, should be composed of new material.

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Judges for the 2014 Prizes

2014 Poetry Judges

Elisabeth FrostElisabeth Frost

Elisabeth Frost’s books include two collections of poetry, All of Us and the chapbook Rumor, as well as a critical study, The Feminist Avant-Garde in American Poetry.  She is co-editor (with Cynthia Hogue) of Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews.  She teaches at Fordham University, where she is founder and editor of the Poets Out Loud book series from Fordham Press.
 

Jessica GreenbaumJessica Greenbaum

Jessica Greenbaum is the author of two collections of poetry: Inventing Difficulty, which won the Gerald Cable Prize in 2000, and The Two Yvonnes, a 2012 selection in the Princeton University Press Series of Contemporary Poets.  She is the poetry editor for the annual upstreet.

Sean Singer

Sean Singer’s first book, Discography, won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize, selected by W.S. Merwin, and the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America. His second book, Honey & Smoke, is forthcoming from Eyewear Publishing in 2015. He has also published two chapbooks, Passport and Keep Right On Playing Through the Mirror Over the Water, both with Beard of Bees Press, and is the recipient of a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. He has a PhD in American Studies from Rutgers-Newark.
 

2014 Prose Judges

Kristopher JansmaKristopher Jansma

Kristopher Jansma's debut novel, The Unchangeable Spots of Leopards, was published by Viking/Penguin and was selected as a ALA 2014 Notable Book. He received his B.A. in The Writing Seminars from Johns Hopkins University and an M.F.A. in Fiction from Columbia University. He writes a monthly column for Electric Literature’s blog, “The Outlet” and his work has also been published in The New York Times, The Believer, Slice Magazine, the Blue Mesa Review, and on The Millions. Currently, he is a Creative Writing Lecturer at SUNY Purchase College.
 

Malena WartrousMalena Watrous

Malena Watrous is the author of the novel, If You Follow Me, which won a Michener-Copernicus award and was selected by the San Francisco Chronicle as one of the best works of fiction by Bay Area Authors in 2010. She attended Barnard College and received an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where she was a Truman Capote Fellow, and was a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford. Her short stories have been published in such literary journals as StoryQuarterly, TriQuarterly, and The Massachusetts Review, and her nonfiction has appeared in Allure, Salon, The Believer, and Conde Nast Traveler. She also writes book reviews for the San Francisco Chronicle and The New York Times. She has taught writing at the University of Iowa, Stanford, and in the MFA program at University of San Francisco.
 

kate zambrenoKate Zambreno

Kate Zambreno is the author of two novels, O Fallen Angel (Chiasmus Press) and Green Girl (Harper Perennial). She is also the author of Heroines (Semiotext(e)'s Active Agents) and Book of Mutter (forthcoming from Wesleyan University Press). She teaches in the creative writing program at Sarah Lawrence College and the MFA program at Columbia University.

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Judges for the 2013 Prizes

2013 Poetry Judges

Miranda Field

Miranda Field is the author of Swallow (Houghton-Mifflin, 2002), which won a Katherine Bakeless Nason Literary Publication Award. Her work appears in numerous journals and several anthologies, including Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century, Not For Mothers Only, Efforts and Affections: Women Poets on Mentorship, and The Pushcart Book of Poetry: The Best Poems from Thirty Years of the Pushcart Prize. She has received a Discovery/The Nation Award, a Bread Loaf Teaching Fellowship, and a Pushcart Prize. She teaches in the Undergraduate Writing Program at New York University.

Elisabeth Frost

Elisabeth FrostElisabeth Frost’s books include two collections of poetry, All of Us and the chapbook Rumor, as well as a critical study, The Feminist Avant-Garde in American Poetry.  She is co-editor (with Cynthia Hogue) of Innovative Women Poets: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and Interviews.  She teaches at Fordham University, where she is founder and editor of the Poets Out Loud book series from Fordham Press.

Cathy Hong

Cathy Park HongCathy Park Hong's third collection of poetry, Engine Empire, was published in 2012.  Her second collection, Dance Dance Revolution (2007), was chosen by Adrienne Rich for the Barnard Women Poets Prize, and her first, Translating Mo'um, was published in 2020.  She is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship and a Village Voice Fellowship for Minority Reporters.  She teaches at Sarah Lawrence College.

2013 Prose Judges

Jessica SofferJessica Soffer

Jessica Soffer earned her MFA at Hunter College, where she was a Hertog Fellow. Her work has appeared in Granta and Vogue, among other publications. Her debut novel, Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots, will be published in April 2013. She teaches fiction at Connecticut College and lives in New York City.

Malena Watrous

Malena Wartrous

Malena Watrous is the author of the novel, If You Follow Me, which won a Michener-Copernicus award and was selected by the San Francisco Chronicle as one of the best works of fiction by Bay Area Authors in 2010. She attended Barnard College and received an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where she was a Truman Capote Fellow, and was a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford. Her short stories have been published in such literary journals as StoryQuarterly, TriQuarterly, and The Massachusetts Review, and her nonfiction has appeared in Allure, Salon, The Believer, and Conde Nast Traveler. She also writes book reviews for the San Francisco Chronicle and The New York Times. She has taught writing at the University of Iowa, Stanford, and in the MFA program at University of San Francisco.

Josh Weil

Josh WeilJosh Weil is the author of The New Valley, a New York Times Editors Choice that won the Sue Kaufman Prize from The American Academy of Arts and Letters and a 5-Under-35 Award from the National Book Foundation. Weil’s other writing has appeared in Granta, One Story, and The New York Times. A recipient of fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, the MacDowell Colony, and Bread Loaf and Sewanee Writers’ Conferences, he has been Distinguished Visiting Writer at Bowling Green State University and Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi. His novel, The Great Glass Sea, is forthcoming in early 2014.

 

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page last updated 5/18/14