2009 - 2010


Introductory

ENGLBC1201x,y. First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History
[For more information see course website or library research guide]
Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. Sections of the course are grouped in three clusters: I. Legacy of the Mediterranean; II. The Americas; III. Women and Culture. The first cluster features a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture, as well as excursions to the opera, the theatre, and museums. Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of canonicity, the last two clusters feature curricula that explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in culture.   Required for all first-year students.  Enrollment restricted to Barnard.  May not be taken for P/D/F.  Consult department bulletin board for section times.  3 points

Fall, 2009

Section 1     MW 10:35-11:50am
Section 2     MW 11:00am-12:15pm
Section 3     MW 1:10-2:25pm
Section 4     MW 1:10-2:25pm
Section 5     MW 2:40-3:55pm
Section 6     MW 2:40-3:55pm
Section 7     MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 8     MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 9     MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 10    T Th 9:10-10:25am
Section 11    T Th 9:10a-10:25am
Section 12    T Th 11:00am-12:15pm
Section 13    T Th 1:10-2:25pm
Section 14    T Th 1:10-2:25pm
Section 15    T Th 2:40-3:55pm
Section 16    T Th 2:40-3:55pm
Section 17    T Th 4:10-5:25pm
Section 18    T Th 4:10-5:25pm

Spring, 2010

Section 1     MW 10:35-11:50am
Section 2     MW 11:00am-12:15pm
Section 3     MW 1:10-2:25pm
Section 4     MW 1:10-2:25pm
Section 5     MW 2:40-3:55pm
Section 6     MW 2:40-3:55pm
Section 7     MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 8     MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 9     MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 10    TuTh 9:10-10:25am
Section 11    TuTh 9:10-10:25am
Section 12    TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm
Section 13    TuTh 1:10-2:25pm
Section 14    TuTh 1:10-2:25pm
Section 15    TuTh 2:40-3:55pm
Section 16    TuTh 2:40-3:55pm
Section 17    TuTh 4:10-5:25pm
Section 18    TuTh 4:10-5:25pm
Section 19    TuTh 4:10-5:25pm

ENGLBC1202x First-Year English (Intensive)
Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. Sections of the course are grouped in three clusters: I. Legacy of the Mediterranean; II. The Americas; III. Women and Culture.  The first cluster features a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture.  Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of canonicity, the last two clusters feature curricula that explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in culture.  Meets three times a week. 3 points

Section 1          MW 10:35-11:50am—M. Kolisnyk
Section 2          TuTh 1:10-2:25pm—W. Schor-Haim
Section 3          MW 1:10-2:25pm—S. Fredman

Writing

Registration in each course is limited and permission of the instructor required. A student is not permitted to take two writing courses concurrently.

ENGL BC 3101x The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing
Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring.-  3 points
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit.
T Th 11-12:15              -Cobrin

ENGLBC3103x Essay Writing
English composition above the first-year level. Techniques of argument and effective expression. Weekly papers. Individual conferences. Some sections have a special focus, as described.  Can count towards major. Prerequisites: Departmental sign-up required.- 3 points

Section 1      Th 11-12:50                 -A. Schneider
Section 2       Th 2:10-4                    -J. Runsdorf
Section 3       T 11-12:50                  -W. Schor-Haim

ENGL BC 3104y Essay Writing
English composition above the first-year level. Techniques of argument and effective expression. Weekly papers. Individual conferences. Some sections have a special focus, as described. Can count towards major.Prerequisites: Departmental sign-up required. 3 points
Section 1           P. Ellsberg                                   T 2:10-4     
Section 2           S. Fredman                                  W 2:10-4
Section 3           W. Schor-Haim Th 11-12:50           

Creative Writing

Registration in each course is limited and the permission of the instructor is required; for courses 3105­3120, submit a writing sample in advance.   Departmental application forms are available in the department office, Room 417 Barnard Hall.  The signed forms and writing samples must be filed with the Director of Creative Writing, Professor Timea Szell (423 Barnard) before the end of the program planning period. Two writing courses may not be taken concurrently.

ENGL BC 3105x Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing. Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—T. Szell. 3 points. W 4:10-6pm.

ENGL BC 3106y Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing. Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—A. Dark.3 points. W 11am-12:50pm .

ENGL BC 3107x Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—C. Schutt. 3 points. M 6:10-8pm.

ENGL BC 3108y Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting. Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply. See instructions at the beginning of this section.—N. Hermann. 3 points. W 6:10-8pm.

ENGL BC 3110x Introduction to Poetry Writing
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques. Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—S. Singer. 3 points. W 9-10:50am.

ENGL BC 3110y Introduction to Poetry Writing
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques. Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—C. Barnett. 3 points.  M 2:10-4pm.

ENGL BC 3113x Introduction to Playwriting
A workshop to provoke and investigate dramatic writing. Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—E. McLaughlin. 3 points. M 4:10–6pm

ENGL BC 3114y Advanced Playwriting
Advanced workshop to facilitate the crafting of a dramatic play with a bent towards the full length form. Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—J. Jordan.  3 points. W  2:10-4:00pm.

ENGL BC 3115x Story Writing
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.
Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—M. Gordon.   3 points. T 6:10-8pm.

ENGL BC 3116y Story Writing II
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.
Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—M. Gordon. 3 points. W 6:10-8pm.

ENGL BC 3117x Fiction Writing
Assignments designed to examine form and structure in fiction.—M. Swann. 3 points. W 4:10-6 pm.  Prerequisites: Students will have already written a substantial body of work. Writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—M. Swann. 3 points. W 4:10-6 pm.

ENGL BC 3117y Fiction Writing
Assignments designed to examine form and structure in fiction.Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—M. Keane.3 points, M 11:00am-12:50pm.

ENGL BC 3118x Advanced Poetry Writing
Weekly workshops designed to critique new poetry. Each participant works toward the development of a cohesive collection of poems. Short essays on traditional and contemporary poetry will also be required.Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—S. Hamilton. 3 points. W 4:10-6pm.

ENGL BC 3120x Creative Non-fiction: Journalism
Explores how to apply a literary sensibility to such traditional forms of journalism as the personal essay, general essay, profile, and feature article. Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—R. Panek. 3 points. T 9-10:50am.

ENGL BC 3120y Creative Non-Fiction: Journalism
Explores how to apply a literary sensibility to such traditional forms of journalism as the personal essay, general essay, profile, and feature article.Prerequisites: writing sample required to apply; see instructions at the beginning of this section.—J. Ryle. 3 points. Th 9-10:50am.

Speech

Registration in each course is limited.  Students need to sign up outside the English Department office, room 417 Barnard Hall.

ENGL BC 3121x Public Speaking
Effective oral presentation in speeches, discussions, and interviews. We will explore the reciprocal relationship between active listening and extemporaneous speaking, well-organized writing and spontaneous remarks, rhetorical strategy and audience analysis, historical models and contemporary practice. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Departmental sign-up required.—P. Denison. 3 points. T Th 10:35-11:50am.

ENGL BC 3121y Public Speaking
Effective oral presentation in speeches, discussions, and interviews. We will explore the reciprocal relationship between active listening and extemporaneous speaking, well-organized writing and spontaneous remarks, rhetorical strategy and audience analysis, historical models and contemporary practice. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Departmental sign-up required.—P. Denison. 3 points. T Th 10:35-11:50am.

ENGL BC 3123 Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking
Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program.—P. Cobrin. 3 points. T Th 2:40-3:55pm.

Theatre

Registration in ENTH seminars is limited to 16 students. See Theatre Department course descriptions for Theatre History (THTR V 3150, 3151), Drama and Film (THTR V 3143), Drama, Theatre, and Theory (THTR V 3166), Modernism and 20th-Century Theatre (THTR V 3737), and The History Play (THTR V 3750).

No theatre courses offered through the English Department Fall 2009.

ENTH BC 3137y Restoration and 18th-Century Drama
Performance conventions, dramatic structures, and cultural contexts from 1660 to 1800.  Playwrights include Wycherley, Etherege, Behn, Trotter, Centlivre, Dryden, Congreve, Farquhar, Gay, Goldsmith, and Sheridan. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Departmental sign-up required.—P. Denison. 4 points. W 11am-12:50pm.

ENTH 3144y Black Theatre
Exploration in Black Theatre, specifically African-American performance traditions, as an intervening agent in racial, cultural and national identity. African-American theater artists to be examined include Amiri Baraka, Kia Corthron, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angelina Grimke, Langston Huges, Georgia Douglas Jognson, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrian Piper and August Wilson.Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Departmental sign-up required.—P. Cobrin. 4 points. Th 11am-12:50pm.

Language and Literature

ENGL BC 3140x, y Seminars on Special Themes:

Fall 09:

Section 1: Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890
Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered.Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18. Departmental sign-up required.—Q. Prettyman. 3 points. T Th 2:40-3:55pm.

Section 8: English Renaissance Women Writers
Despite popular conceptions insisting that the ideal Renaissance woman was silent, as well as chaste and obedient, many women in the early modern period (c. 1550-1800) defied such sentiments by writing, circulating and publishing their own literature. Under the influence of humanism, a generation of educated women arose who would become both the audience for and contributors to the great flowering of literature written in sixteenth and seventeenth century England. As we examine how these women addressed questions of love, marriage, age, race and class, we will also consider the roles women and ideas about gender played in the production of English literature. We will read from a range of literary (plays, poetry, and non-literary (cookbooks, broadside, midwifery books) texts. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25. Departmental sign-up required.K. Hall.3 points. MW 5:40-6:55pm.

Spring 10:

Section 3: The American Cowboy and the Iconography of the West
We will consider the image and role of the cowboy in fiction, social history, film, music, and art. Readings will include Cormac McCarthy's The Border Trilogy among other things. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students.Departmental sign-up required.P. Ellsberg. 3 points. MW 1:10-2:25pm.

Section 6: Reading Barnard Writing
A century of American literature seen through the lens of works by women who were all Barnard undergraduates. Topics include Jewish immigration, the Harlem Renaissance, Greenwich Village bohemianism, feminism, black pride, sexual liberation, the rise of ethnic American identity, the "downtown" scene of the 1980s, etc. Authors may include Antin, Millay, Hurston, Calisher, Chang, Jong, Shange, Gordon, Quindlen, Janowitz, Danticat, Lahiri, and others. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 30 students. Departmental sign-up required.W. Sharpe.3 points. T Th 2:40-3:55pm.

Section 7: Doubt, Death, and Desire in 17th-century Prose
Reading, from multiple perspectives, the great "metaphysical writers" on these big issues, including faith. John Donne's Devotions and selected Sermons; Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy (i.e., madness and depression); Sir Thomas Browne's Urne Buriall, and Richard Crashaw's bizarre poems "St. Mary Magdalene or The Weeper" and "Hymn to St. Teresa" will be included. No departmental sign-up required.A. Guibbory and M. Gordon. 3 points. T Th  2:40-3:55pm.

ENGL BC 3141x Major English Texts I
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Autumn: Beowulf through Johnson. Guest lectures by members of the department.P. Ellsberg. 3 points. MW 11am-12:15pm.

ENGL BC 3142y Major English Texts II
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Spring: Romantic poets through the present. Guest lectures by members of the department.P. Ellsberg. 3 points. MW 11am-12:15pm.

AFEN BC 3148y Literature of the Great Migration: 1916-1970
Explores, through fiction, poetry, essays, and film, the historical context and cultural content of the African American migration from the rural south to the urban cities of the north, with particular emphasis on New York, Chicago, Boston, and Philadelphia.Q. Prettyman. 3 points. T Th  1:10-2:25pm.

ENGLBC 3149y Cultures of Colonialism: Palestine/Israel
The significance of colonial encounter, statehood, and dispossession in Palestinian and Israeli cultures from 1948 to the present, examined in a range of cultural forms: poetry, political tracts, cinema, fiction, memoirs, and travel writing. Authors include: Darwish, Grossman, Habibi, Khalifeh, Khleifi, Kanafani, Oz, Shabtai, Shalev, and Yehoshua.B. Abu-Manneh. 3 points. T Th 10:35-11:50am.

ENGL BC 3155x Canterbury Tales
Chaucer as inheritor of late-antique and medieval conventions and founder of early modern literature and the fiction of character. Selections from related medieval texts.C. Baswell. 3 points. T Th 9:10-10:25am.

ENGL BC 3158y Medieval Literature: Literatures of Medieval Britain
A survey of medieval literatures of the British Isles, and related European texts, from the twelfth to the fifteenth century. Although the course covers many genres and topics, the legends of King Arthur will be a connective thread. Medieval literature and the British Isles as colonized space. Literature before the invention of "England." The multi-ethnic and multilingual culture of the British Middle Ages. The challenge of texts originally accompanied by illustrations. Selfhood as more a social than a private entity. Two papers, mid-term, and take-home final.C. Baswell. 3 points. MW 1:10-2:25pm.

ENGL BC 3159x and 3160y The English Colloquium:
Required of majors in the junior year. All sections of 3159 (fall semester) are on the Renaissance; all sections of 3160 (spring semester) are on the Enlightenment. Students may substitute 3 courses--from ENGL BC3154-BC3158, BC3163-BC3164, BC3165-BC3169, or ENTH V3136-V3137. Students may also take 1 colloquium and 2 substitutions. At least one of these courses must cover Medieval or Renaissance material; at least one material of the 17th or 18th Century. One of these will also count toward satisfying the "before 1900" requirement. - 4 points

Fall (3159x):

SECTION 1:  Imitation and Creation
New ideas of the mind's relation to the world. New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style.
      T 4:10-6pm                       -R. Hamilton

SECTION 2: Skepticism and Affirmation
The development of modern concepts of subjectivity and authority. The rise of art and the artist. Myth versus science. Knowledge versus experience. Humanism, Rationalism, Empiricism. The tension between belief and doubt. The exploration of limits and the limitless. Definition of the beautiful and the sublime. 
      W 2:10-4pm                     -M. Jaanus

SECTION 3:  Reason and Imagination
Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience.
      W 4-6pm                          -C. Plotkin

SECTION 4:  Order and Disorder
The tension, conflicts, and upheavals of an era in the arts, religion, politics, aesthetics, and society.
      T 11am-12:50pm               -A. Guibbory

Spring (3160y):

Section 1: Imitation and Creation
New ideas of the mind's relation to the world. New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style.  Sign-up through eBear.
       T 4:10-6:00pm                  -T. Szell.

Section 2: Skepticism and Affirmation
The development of modern concepts of subjectivity and authority. The rise of art and the artist. Myth versus science. Knowledge versus experience. Humanism, Rationalism, Empiricism. The tension between belief and doubt. The exploration of limits and the limitless. Definition of the beautiful and the sublime.  Sign-up through eBear.
        W 2:10-4pm                     -M. Jaanus

Section 3: Reason and Imagination
Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience.  Sign-up through eBear.
        W 4:10-6pm                     -C. Plotkin

Section 4: Order and Disorder
The tension, conflicts, and upheavals of an era in the arts, religion, politics, aesthetics, and society.  Sign-up through eBear.
         M 2:10-4pm                     -J. Basker

ENGL BC 3163x Shakespeare I
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students. Departmental sign-up required.P. Platt. 3 points. MW 9:10-10:25am.

ENGL BC 3164y Shakespeare II
Critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students. Departmental sign-up required.W. Kenton. 3 points. MW 9:10-10:25am.

ENGL BC 3166y Seventeenth-century Prose and Poetry
Seventeenth-century poetry and prose: Sex, love, and God in lyric poetry, John Donne to Rochester (1600-1678); politics and religion in prose of the English Revolution (1642-1660), including political philosopher Thomas Hobbes, the female prophet Anna Trapnel, and the first communist, Winstanley.A. Guibbory. 3 points. T Th 2:40-3:55pm.

ENGL BC 3167y Milton
Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes and selections of Milton's earlier poetry and prose (defenses of free press, divorce, individual conscience, political and religious liberty) read within the context of religious, political, and cultural history, but with a sense of connection to present issues.A. Guibbory. 3 points. T Th 11:00am-12:15pm.

ENGL BC 3169x Renaissance Drama: Marlowe, Jonson, and Webster
Renaissance English Drama: An examination of three major Renaissance dramatists who wrote in a wide range of genres and styles. The course will take account of larger developments in English drama in late Elizabethan and earlier Stuart times, and there will be nods in the direction of Shakespeare, but the focus will be on Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, and John Webster.A. Prescott. 3 points. MW 11am-12:15pm.

ENGL BC 3171x Culture of the Novel
The novel in its cultural context, with an emphasis on psychoanalysis. Reading selected novels from Austen to W.G. Sebald.M. Jaanus. 3 points. MW 11am-12:15pm.

ENGL BC 3173x  18th-Century Literature (1660-1820): Sex & Sensibility in the 18th-Century Novel
This course will examine the "rise" of the eighteenth-century British novel from its unruly and disreputable origins to its arrival as a respectable and accepted genre. Along the way we'll consider how the novel was affected by and effected changes in gender, sexuality, authorship, and political and social institutions. Readings to include Behn, Defoe, Haywood, Richardson, Fielding, Cleland, Sterne, Wollstonecraft, and Austen.K. Levin. 3 points. T Th 11am-12:15pm.

ENGL BC 3176y The Romantic Era
Romantic writers in their intellectual, historical, and political context, with reference to contemporary movements in philosophy, music, and the plastic arts.  Authors include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats.  An emphasis on close reading of the poetry.C. Plotkin. 3 points. T Th 1:10-2:25pm.

ENGL BC 3177y Victorian Age in Literature: the Novel
Works by Jane Austen, Emily Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy and Joseph Conrad.  While attending to form and style, we will focus on the relation of these fictional worlds to the historical and social realities of the period.  Attention will be paid to how the novels reflect or challenge Victorian ideas about ambition, desire, sexuality, education, labor, domesticity, and global empire.Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60. Departmental sign-up required.M. Cregan.  3 pointsT Th 10:35-11:50am.

ENGL BC 3178x Victorian Poetry and Criticism
Poetry, art, and aesthetics in an industrial society, with emphasis on the role of women as artists and objects. Poems by Tennyson, Arnold, Christina and D.G. Rossetti, Swinburne, and Elizabeth and Robert Browning; criticism by Ruskin, Arnold, and Wilde; paintings by the Pre-Raphaelites and Whistler; photographs by J.M. Cameron.W. Sharpe. 3 points. T Th 4:10-5:25pm.

ENGL BC 3179x American Literature to 1800
Early American histories, autobiographies, poems, plays, and novels tell stories of pilgrimage and colonization; private piety and public life; the growth of national identity; Puritanism, Quakerism, and Deism; courtship and marriage; slavery and abolition. Writers include Bradford, Shepard, Bradstreet, Taylor, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Franklin, Woolman, and Brown.L. Gordis. 3 points. MW 11am-12:15pm.

ENGL BC 3180y American Literature, 1800-1870
Texts from the late Republican period through the Civil War explore the literary implications of American independence, the representation of Native Americans, the nature of the self, slavery and abolition, gender and woman's sphere, and the Civil War. Writers include Irving, Emerson, Poe, Fuller, Thoreau, Douglass, Stowe, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.L. Gordis.3 points. MW 11am-12:15pm.

ENGL BC 3181y American Literature, 1871-1945
American literature in the context of cultural and historical change. Writers include Twain, James, DuBois, Wharton, Cather, Wister, Faulkner, Hurston.M. Vandenburg. 3 points. T Th 2:40-3:55pm.

ENGL BC 3183y American Literature since 1945
American fiction, literary and cultural criticism since 1945. Topics include: the authorial and critical search for the great contemporary American novel, the particularity of "American" characters, genres, aesthetics, subjects, the effect of these debates on canon formation and the literary marketplace. Authors may include: Bellow, Ellison, Nabokov, Kerouac, Didion, Pynchon, Morrison, and Lahiri.M. Miller3 points. T Th 1:10-2:25pm.

ENGL BC 3185y Modern British and American Poetry
Poetry written in English during the past century, discussed in the context of modernism, postmodernism, literary theory, and changing social and technological developments. Students will participate in shaping the syllabus and leading class discussion. Authors may include Yeats, Williams, Eliot, Moore, Bishop, Rich, Ginsberg, Stevens, O' Hara, Plath, Brooks, Jordan, Walcott, Alexie, and many others.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 35. Departmental sign-up required.W. Sharpe. 3 points. T Th 4:10-5:25pm.

ENGL BC 3188x The Modern Novel
Examines formal changes in the novel from nineteenth-century realism to stream of consciousness, montage, and other modernist innovations. Contexts include World War I, technology, urbanization, nostalgia, sexuality and the family, mass culture, psychoanalysis, empire and colonialism. Representative works from authors such as James, Forster, West, Ford, Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce.
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 50 students. Departmental sign-up required.M. Gordon. 3 points. MW 11am-12:15pm.

ENGL BC 3190y Global Literature in English
Selective survey of fiction from the ex-colonies, focusing on the colonial encounter, cultural and political decolonization, and belonging and migration in the age of postcolonial imperialism. Areas covered include Africa (Achebe, Aidoo, Armah, Ngugi); the Arab World (Mahfouz, Munif, Salih, Souief); South Asia (Mistry, Rushdie, Suleri); the Carribean (Kincaid); and New Zealand (Hulme).B. Abu-Manneh. 3 points. T Th 2:40-3:55pm.

ENGL BC 3191x, y The English Conference: The Lucyle Hook Guest Lectureship
Various topics presented by visiting scholars in courses that will meet for two to four weeks during each semester. Topics, instructors, and times will be announced by the department. Students must attend all classes to receive credit for this course.
To be taken only for P/D/F. Enrollment limited to 60 students. Departmental sign-uprequired.  1 point.

Fall, 2009

ENGL BC 3191x: Dante in English
Dante’s poetry has been widely influential since the fifteenth century and is still much read, translated and imitated in Britain, Ireland and the U.S.A. Using two recent anthologies, Dante in English (Penguin Classics), and The Poets’ Dante: Twentieth-Century Responses (Farrar)), this course will include a reading in English translation of some of the best known episodes of The Divine Comedy, a comparison of styles and interpretations, a discussion of the questions of translation and adaptation, and a survey of some of the critical and poetical responses Dante has elicited, from Chaucer and Keats to T. S. Eliot, Samuel Beckett, and Seamus Heaney. We will try to discover why Dante’s vision has spoken to so many writers at different times and what it can tell us today of the culture we live in. —M. Bacigalupo. Wednesdays, 6:10-8 pm, September 30th & October 7th, 14th, 21st.

Spring, 2010:

ENGL BC 3191y Torture: a short course
‘Torture is a barbarity that has no place in a modern democracy.’   True or false?  Abu Ghraib dispelled the restful assumption that torture is the purview of violent sects, rogue police and distant authoritarian regimes.  In fact, since human-rights monitoring began in the Seventies (along with specific bans on use of torture), and since the disappearance of many of the world’s dictatorships, the use of torture by governments has continued apace.  What is the history and what are the facts?   And what, furthermore, do philosophers, historians, novelists and playwrights have to tell us about those facts?  What is the meaning of torture?  Is it always wrong? Does torture ever work? Over four class periods we will consider changing attitudes and practice -- from maximally gory public spectacle to covert and unmarked interrogation -- and try to make sense of the intractable and almost inconceivable violence committed, most often, in the name of security. Possible texts: Edwige Danticat The Dew Breaker; Ariel DorfmanDeath and the Maiden; Shusaku Endo Silence; Primo Levi:If this is a Man/the Truce.  And excerpts from these works of non-fiction: Michel Foucault Discipline and Punish; Phillip Bobbitt Terror and Consent: the Wars for the Twenty-First Century; Sam Harris The End of Faith, Religion: Terror and the Future of Reason; Darius Rejali Torture and Democracy; Mark Danner Torture and Truth; and Kafka.—I. Fonseca. Mondays, 4:10-6 pm, January 25th & February 1st, 8th, and 15th.

ENGL BC 3193x, y: Literary Criticism and Theory
Provides experience in the reading and analysis of literary texts and some knowledge of conspicuous works of literary criticism.  Frequent short papers.   Required of all majors before the end of the junior year.  Sophomores are encouraged to take it in the spring term even before officially declaring their major.  Transfer students should plan to take BC3193 in the autumn term.   Registration in each section is limited.  Departmental registration required.  4 points

Fall 09:

Section 1    Th 4:10-6pm                  C. Brown
Section 2    T 11am-12:50pm            M. Cregan
Section 3    W 2:10-4pm                  P. Platt
Section 4    T 2:10-4pm                    R. Hamilton
Section 5    Wam 11-12:50pm          S. Pedatella

Spring 10:

Section 1    Th 4:10-6:00pm             C. Brown
Section 2    T 4:10-6:00pm               C. Plotkin
Section 3    W 11:00am-12:50pm      J. Pagano
Section 4    W 2:10-4:00pm             W. Sharpe
Section 5    W 12:10-2:00pm            B. Abu-Manneh

ENGL BC 3194x  A History of Literary Theory & Criticism
What is literature? Does it tell the truth? What is its relation to the other arts? How do we judget it? How can we talk about it? Such questions form the matter of a conversation among philosophers, writers, and, latterly, "critics" that has gone on for two-and-a-half thousand years. Their responses both influence and reflect the literature contemporary with them. Readings from critics and theoreticians from the Classical world to the beginnings of poststructuralism, with attention to contemporaneous literature.C. Plotkin. 3 points. T Th 4:10-5:25pm.

ENGL BC 3195x  Modernism
Modernist responses to cultural fragmentation and gender anxiety in the wake of psychoanalysis and world war. Works by Woolf, Joyce, Yeats, Eliot, Stein, Hemingway, Toomer, H.D., Pound, Lawrence, Barnes, and other Anglo-American writers.M. Vandenburg. 3 points. T Th 2:40-3:55pm.

 

PREFACE for 3996: All independent study projects require a completed form being filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall).  See the “Forms & Procedures” section of the English Department website for more details.

ENGL BC 3996x and y Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation
Senior majors who are concentrating in Theatre or Writing and have completed two courses in writing or three in theatre will normally take the Special Project in Theatre or Writing (BC3996 x or y) in combination with an additional course in their special field. This counts in place of one of the Senior Seminars. In certain cases, Independent Study (BC3999 - see below) may be substituted for the Special Project.  Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Chair required.  In rare cases, with the permission of the Chair, a special project in conjunction with a course may be taken by other English majors.  1 point.

ENGL W 4502x  British Literature, 1950 to the Present
This course will trace English fiction (and a few films) from the center and from the margins, from the post-WWII era to contemporary social and narratological preoccupations. Writers will include: Martin Amis, John Banville, Pat Barker, Graham Greene, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, David Mitchell, V.S. Naipaul, John Osborne, W.G. Sebald, and films by Carol Reed, Michael Apted, Joseph Losey, Tony Richardson, Mike Leigh, Stanley Kubrick and Stephen Frears.M. Spiegel. 3 points. T Th 4:10-5:25pm.

ENGL BC 3252x Contemporary Media Theory
Explores the transformation of social organization and consciousness by and as media technologies during the long 20th century. Students will read influential works of media analysis written during the past century, analyze film and digital media, and explore political and media theory generated since the rise of the internet. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 15 students.Departmental sign-up required.J. Beller. 4 points. MW 11am-12:50pm.

ENRE BC 3810x Literary Approaches to the Bible
Interpretive strategies for reading the Bible as a work with literary dimensions. Considerations of poetic and rhetorical structures, narrative techniques, and feminist exegesis will be included. Topics for investigation include the influence of the Bible on literature, combined with the more formal disciplines of biblical studies.P. Ellsberg. 4 points. T 2:10-4pm.

 

Senior Seminars
Enrollment limited to senior English majors (and film majors for the English/film section). Signing up is through a special tab in eBear. - 4 points.

FALL 09:

Section 1: City in Literature
London in the Nineteenth Century. How does urban experience provoke formal innovations, deformations, and fascination with the sensational, the grotesque, the mysterious? Special emphasis on the nighttime as a site of exploration and transgression. Works by Dickens, Engels, Mayhew, Doré, Whistler, Ruskin, Stevenson, Wilde, Doyle, and others. Prerequisites: Sign up through tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to seniors.
                       W 4:10-6pm                       -W. Sharpe

Section 2: Late Victorian and Modern Drama
Drama in transition. Changing social structures and dramatic structures at the turn of the century. The relationship between convention and invention and the interface of text and performance in the plays of Pinero, Wilde, Shaw, Strindberg, Ibsen, Chekhov, Robins, and others. Prerequisites: Sign up through  tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to seniors.
                       W 11am-12:50pm               -P. Denison

Section 3: Poets & their Correspondence
How do poets' letters inform our understanding of their poetry? From the eighteenth to the twentieth century, poets have used their intimate correspondence to "baffle absence," as Coleridge remarked. This course will examine the ways several masters of the letter (including Cowper, Keats, Dickinson, Eliot, Bishop, and Lowell, among others) shaped their prose to convey spontaneity in paradoxically artful ways, illuminating their major work as poets and making the private letter a literary form in its own right. Prerequisites: Sign up through tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to seniors.
                       T 4:10-6pm                       -S. Hamilton

Section 4:  Reading and Writing Women in Colonial America
In April 1645, John Winthrop lamented the sorry state of Ann Yale Hopkins, "who was fallne into a sadd infirmytye, the losse of her vnderstandinge & reason . . . by occasion of her giving her selfe wholly to readinge & writing, & had written many bookes." This course considers colonial women as authors and as readers, sampling a variety of genres (court transcripts, confessions, poetry, autobiographies, captivity narratives, novels, and commonplace books) and exploring topics including theology, marriage, scribal publication, and the American Revolution. We will read texts by women writers, including Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Phillis Wheatley, and Hannah Foster, as well as texts that reveal women's reading and publication practices, such as accounts of Anne Hutchinson and Milcah Martha Moore's Book. Prerequisites: Sign up through tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to seniors.
                       W 2:10-4pm                     -L. Gordis

Section 5:  Monsters, Machines, Cyborgs: toward a History of Technology
Artistic and literary responses to technological change that transformed the idea of what it means to be human, from Shakespeare's The Tempest to Shelley's Frankenstein, from La Mettrie's Man-Machine to Ridley Scott's Alien. Prerequisites: Sign up through tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to seniors.
                       T 11am-12:50pm                 -R. Hamilton

Section 6:  Political Love
Interrogates relationship between nationalism and novel-form in global fiction. Focuses on issues of cultural and political theory, history, and literary form. Asks: is the novel the voice of the nation, and is the terrain of the nation adequate for understanding the novel? Prerequisites: Sign up through tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to seniors.
                       T 2:10-4pm                       -B. Abu-Manneh

Spring 10:

Section 1: The Concept of Happiness
Interdisciplinary examination of the idea of happiness from Aristotle to the present. Short readings in a variety of literary and other texts.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to seniors. 
                        W 11:00am-12:50pm          -M. Jaanus

Section 2: Film: The Man in the Crowd/The Woman of the Streets
Explores theories and representations of the crowd, mass behavior and ideas about the individual in the period between the two World Wars.  Looking mostly at fiction and film from the U.S. and Germany between 1918 -1939, the course centers on representations of Berlin and New York.  Films by Lang, Ruttmann, Rosselini, Wenders, Von Sternberg, Vidor, Chaplin, Sheeler and Strand, Engel, Berkeley and others.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to seniors. 
                        Th 2:10-4:00pm                -M. Spiegel

Section 3: The American Sublime
“The empty spirit / In vacant space”: gothicism, transcendentalism, and postmodern rapture.  Traces of the sublime in the American literary landscape, featuring Brown, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Stevens, Bishop, Reed, Pynchon, Robinson, and Harding.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to seniors.
                        Th 4:10-6:00pm                -M. Vandenberg

Section 4: Sexuality & Spirituality
The first half of the course is grounded in readings from Bible, Augustine, Petrarch and Donne, but students may then explore the relation and intersection between sexuality, sin, and spirituality up into the present, and cross-culturally.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to seniors. 
                        W 2:10-4:00pm                -A. Guibbory

Section 5: The Making & Unmaking of the Poetic Canon
This seminar reviews the emergence of poetry anthologies from the 18th century to the present, while sampling a wide variety of lyric poetry (Neoclassical and Romantic to Modernist and Contemporary) and re-examining such issues as what it is we value in poetry and how we might reinvent the "canon" we have inherited. Students will create their own anthologies and have the option to do editorial or critical projects for their final submissions.Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to seniors. 
                        W 4:10-6:00pm                - J. Basker

Section 6: Late Shakespeare: Visions and Revisions
Shakespeare's last plays as both experimental and revisionary. Topics will include aesthetics, philosophy, politics, sexuality, and gender, as well as 20th-century criticism's reconstruction of these final plays. Probable texts: Measure for Measure, Othello, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to seniors.
                        T 2:10-4:00pm                  - P. Platt


PREFACE for 3999: All independent study projects require a completed form being filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall).  See the “Forms & Procedures” section of the English Department website for more details.


ENGL BC 3999x and y Independent Study
Senior majors who wish to substitute Independent Study for one of the two required senior seminars should consult the chair. Permission is given rarely and only to students who present a clear and well-defined topic of study, who have a department sponsor, and who submit their proposals well in advance of the semester in which they will register. There is no independent study for screenwriting or film production. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Department Chair.- 4 points.

 

Cross-Listed Courses
Taught by Barnard English faculty

English & Comparative Literature

CLEN W4015y Textual Analysis: Vernacular Paleography
This course will survey the history of the manuscript book from the Carolingians to the early years of printing (9th -15th century). Students will study the questions that have driven the field of paleography since its inception, and the canonical history of the main scripts used in Western Europe during the later Middle Ages. We will consider the manuscript book as a physical artifact, in a codicological approach; and we will look at the production of books in their social and political settings. Students will develop practical skills in reading and transcription, and will begin to recognize the features that allow localization and dating of manuscripts. We will use original materials from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library whenever possible. Students will be expected to have a basic knowledge of Latin.  (Lecture)
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.C. Baswell. MW 9:10-10:50am.

CLEN W4121x The Renaissance in Europe: Sonnet Sequences
(Lecture) Key texts of 15th- and 16th-century humanism in their rhetorical and philosophical contexts, including works by Petrarch, Erasmus, More, Machiavelli, Castiglione, Sidney, and Montaigne.
3 points.—A. Prescott. MW 2:40-3:55pm.

CLEN G 4995x Special Topics in Modern Literature: Reading Lacan
(Seminar) This semester we will study selections from the late Lacan: Seminar XX Encore (On feminine sexuality) and beyond to Seminars XXI The non-dupes err/The names of the father (Les non-dupes errent/Le nom-du-père), XX R.S.I. and XXIII Sinthome together with essays by Jacques-Alain Miller and Badiou and modern and postmodern novels and short stories. Emphasis on the relevance of Lacan's thought to literature and culture, and to questions of neuroscience, capitalism, democracy, and happiness. Undergraduates are welcome to enroll in the course; if they cannot do so automatically, they should come to the Columbia English Dept. (602 Philosophy Hall) for an approval slip to take to the registrar. Application instructions: E-mail Professor M. Jaanus (mj35@columbia.edu) by noon on Wednesday, April 15, with the subject heading "Reading Lacan." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.M. Jaanus. 4 points. T 2:10-4pm.

Film Studies (Barnard)

FILM BC 3119x Screenwriting (FALL)
A practical workshop in dramatic writing for the screen. Through a series of creative writing exercises, script analysis, and scene work, students explore and develop the basic principles of screenwriting. Either a polished short film script or a preliminary draft of a feature screenplay is the final project.
Prerequisites: Departmental sign-up required. Preference given to students concentrating in film and restricted to Juniors and Seniors. (Since this is a Film Concentration course, it does not count as a writing course for English majors with a Writing Concentration.)—D. McKenna. 3 points. W 1:10-4:00pm.

FILM BC 3201x Introduction to Film and Film Theory
An introductory survey of the history, aesthetics and theories of film. Topics in American and International cinema are explored through weekly screenings, readings, discussion, and lecture. A complete introduction to cinema studies, this course is also the prerequisite for further film courses at Columbia and Barnard. Prerequisites: Departmental sign-up required.General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART).—M. Regan. 3 points. Th 2:40-6:30pm.

page last updated 5/16/11