2010 - 2011


Introductory

ENGL BC 1201x and y First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History
[For more information, see www.barnard.edu/english/reinventingliteraryhistory].  Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively.  Sections of the course are grouped in three clusters: I. Legacy of the Mediterranean; II. The Americas; III. Women and Culture.  The first cluster features a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture.  Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of canonicity, the last two clusters feature curricula that explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in culture.  Prerequisites: Required for all first-year students.  Enrollment restricted to Barnard.  May not be taken for P/D/F.  3 points.

ENGL BC 1204x First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History (Workshop)
Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively.  Sections of the course are grouped in three clusters: I. Legacy of the Mediterranean; II. The Americas; III. Women and Culture. The first cluster features a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture.  Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of canonicity, the last two clusters feature curricula that explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in culture. Meets three times a week.  3 points

Section 1: MWF 10:35-11:50 — M. Kolisnyk
Section 2: MWF 2:40-3:55 — W. Schor-Haim
Section 3: MT Th 1:10-2:25 — S. Fredman


Writing

ENGL BC 3101x The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing
Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring. – P. Cobrin, T Th 11-12:15.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor.  Does not count for major credit.

ENGL BC 3103x & 3104y Essay Writing
English composition above the first-year level.  Techniques of argument and effective expression.  Weekly papers.  Individual conferences.  Some sections have a special focus, as described. Can count towards major.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited 12 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.

Fall:
Section 1: Th 4:10-6 &mdash: M. Ellsberg
Section 2: Th 2:10-4 — W. Schor-Haim
Section 3: Th 12:10-2 — D. Levine
Spring:
Section 1: Th 4:10-6 pm — A. Schneider
Section 2: W 2:10-4 pm — S. Fredman
Section 3: M 11 am-12:50 pm — W. Schor-Haim


Creative Writing

Registration in each course is limited and the permission of the instructor is required; for courses 3105-3120, submit a writing sample in advance. Departmental applications forms, (available in the Department Office, 417 Barnard Hall, and at www.barnard.edu/english) and writing samples must be filed with the Director of Creative Writing, Professor Timea Szell (423 Barnard) before the end of the program planning period. Two creative writing courses may not be taken concurrently.

ENGL 3105x Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing.—D. Steinke.  T 4:10-6.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3106y Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing.-T. Szell, W 4:10–6 pm.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3107x Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.—E. Minot.  W 6:10-8.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3108y Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.—N. Hermann, W 6:10–8 pm.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3110x Introduction to Poetry Writing
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques. – Y. Christiansë; Th 11-12:50.  3 points
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3110y Introduction to Poetry Writing
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques.S. Hamilton, M 11 am-12:50 pm. Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details. 3 points.

ENGL BC 3113x Playwriting I
A workshop to provoke and investigate dramatic writing. – E. McLaughlin, M 9-10:50 a.m.  3 points
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3114y Playwriting II
Workshop to facilitate the crafting of a dramatic play with a bent towards the full length form.-Tanya Barfield, M 12:10–2 pm
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3115x Story Writing I
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.—M. Wolitzer, T 6:10-8.  (M. Gordon will be on leave for the fall of 2010).  3 points.  Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction.  Conference hours to be arranged.  Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3116y Story Writing II
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.—M. Gordon, W 6:10–8 pm.  Prerequisites: Some experience in writing of fiction.  Conference hours to be arranged.  Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.  3 points

ENGL BC 3117x Fiction Writing
Assignments designed to examine form and structure in fiction.—M. Keane, M 4:10-6.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Previous experience or introductory class strongly recommended.  Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3117y Fiction Writing
Assignments designed to examine form and structure in fiction.—S. Nayman, F 11 am-12:50 pm.   Prerequisites: Previous experience or introductory class strongly recommended.  Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.  3 points

ENGL BC 3118x Advanced Poetry Writing
Weekly workshops designed to critique new poetry. Each participant works toward the development of a cohesive collection of poems.  Short essays on traditional and contemporary poetry will also be required.—S. Hamilton, T 12:10-2.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3120x Creative Non-Fiction
Explores how to apply a literary sensibility to such traditional forms of journalism as the personal essay, general essay, profile, and feature article.—H. Moore, T 2:10-4.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3120y Creative Non-Fiction
Explores how to apply a literary sensibility to such traditional forms of Non-Fiction as the personal essay, general essay, profile, and feature article.—R. Panek, M 11-12:50 pm.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.  3 points


Speech

Registration in each course is limited.

ENGL BC 3121x, y Public Speaking
Effective oral presentation in speeches, discussions, and interviews. We will explore the reciprocal relationship between active listening and extemporaneous speaking, well-structured writing and spontaneous remarks, rhetorical strategy and audience analysis, historical models and contemporary practice.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students.  Attend first class for instructor permission.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.  Preference given to juniors and seniors.—P. Denison, T Th 10:35-11:50.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3123x Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking
Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program.—P. Cobrin & J. Zuraw, T Th 2:40-3:55.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor.


Theatre

Registration in ENTH seminars is limited to 16 students.  See Theatre Department course descriptions for Theatre History (THTR V 3150, 3151), Drama and Film (THTR V 3143), Drama, Theatre, and Theory (THTR V 3166), Modernism and 20th-Century Theatre (THTR V 3737), and The History Play (THTR V 3750).

ENTH BC3136x Shakespeare in Performance
Shakespeare's plays as theatrical events. Differing performance spaces, acting traditions, directorial frames, theatre practices, performance theories, critical studies, cultural codes, and historical conventions promote differing modes of engagement with drama in performance. We will explore Shakespeare's plays in the context of actual and possible performance from the Renaissance to the twenty-first century.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Attend first class for instructor permission. Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.  Preference given to juniors and seniors.—P. Denison, W 11-12:50.  4 points.

ENTH BC 3145y Early American Drama and Performance: Staging a Nation
Competing constructions of American identity in the United States date back to the early republic when a newly emerging nation struggled with the questions: What makes an American American?  What makes America America?  From colonial times forward, the stage has served as a forum to air differing beliefs as well as medium to construct new beliefs about Nation, self and other.  The texts we will read, from colonial times through WWI, explore diverse topics such as politics, Native American rights, slavery, labor unrest, gender roles, and a growing immigrant population.—P. Cobrin, Th 11 am-12:50 pm.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required. Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment4 points.

ENTH BC 3147y Shakespeare, Theory, Performance
Course focuses on the historical and theoretical implications of Shakespearean drama in performance; attention given to early modern and modern history of Shakespeare's plays onstage, and to film, television, and digital performance. Substantial engagement with literary, cultural, and performance theory.—W. B. Worthen, MW 10:35-11:50 am.  Prerequisites: Attend first class for instructor permission.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.  3 points


Language and Literature

ENGL BC 3140x and y: Seminars on Special Themes:  3 points

Fall, 2010

Section 1: Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890
Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered.—Q. Prettyman, T Th 1:10-2:25.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.
Section 6: The Shadow Knows
The well-known story of Peter Pan's lost shadow, attached by Wendy, seems to belong to the world of fantasy. But it reminds us of an everyday fact: in the world of art, shadows are arbitrary. They can come and go at the whim of artist or writer. While in life we have shadows with us as long as we breathe, in literature and the visual arts, and often in our spoken words, they require-and deserve-constant attention. If on a literal level shadows emphasize light, space, and corporeal reality, in artistic uses and metaphoric speech they express some of our deepest emotions, from fear to desire; they invoke mystery and misery; they teach us and tease us. This course will investigate both real-world and artistic shadows, using texts and images from philosophy, literature, painting, sculpture, photography, and film. We will study texts by Plato, Pliny, Chamisso, Andersen, Shakespeare, Donne, Dickens, Poe, Conrad, Barrie, and others; and visual images by Masaccio, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Munch, Hopper; Talbot, Stieglitz, Strand, Brassai, Murnau, Wiene, Duchamp, DeChirico, Warhol, and others.—W. Sharpe, T Th 2:40-3:55.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 30 students. Sign-up with the English Department required. Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.

Spring, 2011
Section 3: The American Cowboy and the Iconography of the West
We will consider the image and role of the cowboy in fiction, social history, film, music, and art. Readings will include Cormac McCarthy’s “The Border Trilogy.” –M. Ellsberg, MW 1:10-2:25 pm.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Sign-up with the English Department required. Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.

Section 9: Black Internationalisms
This course locates itself in renewed, energetic debates around contemporary and deeper histories of transnationalism and Diaspora studies, particular the work of Brent Hayes Edwards in The Practice of Diapora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism (a required text).  African American and Africana studies have never been confined to national borders, but how has this Diasporic sense been reflected in the popular imaginary and other exchanges?  We also engage the interdisciplinarity of knowledge production in these studies, and we ask what the current status is of black internationalisms are, and how and where they are most readily expressed in the arts.—Y. Christiansë, MW 2:40-3:55 pm.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.  3 points.


ENGL BC 3141x Major English Texts I
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works.  Autumn: Beowulf through Johnson.  Guest lectures by members of the department.—M. Ellsberg, MW 11-12:15.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3142y Major English Texts II
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Spring: Romantic poets through the present.  Guest lectures by members of the department.—M. Ellsberg, MW 11 am-12:15 pm.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3143y Middle Fictions: Long Stories, Short Novels, Novellas
Discussion of fictions between 60-150 pages in length.  Authors include James, Joyce, Mann, Nabokov, Cather, Welty, West, Porter, Olsen, Trevor.—M. Gordon, MW 11 am-12:15 pm.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3149y Cultures of Colonialism: Palestine/Israel
The significance of colonial encounter, statehood, and dispossession in Palestinian and Israeli cultures from 1948 to the present, examined in a range of cultural forms: poetry, political tracts, cinema, fiction, memoirs, and travel writing.  Authors include: Darwish, Grossman, Habibi, Khalifeh, Khleifi, Kanafani, Oz, Shabtai, Shalev, and Yehoshua.—B. Abu-Manneh, TuTh 2:40-3:55 pm.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3154y Chaucer Before Canterbury
Chaucer's innovations with major medieval forms: lyric, the extraordinary dream visions, and the culmination of medieval romance, Troilus and Criseyde.  Approaches through close analysis, and feminist and historicist interpretation.  Background readings in medieval life and culture.—C. Baswell, MW 1:10-2:25 pm. —3 points.

BC 3159-3160 - THE ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM PREFACE: Required of majors in the junior year.  All sections of 3159 (fall semester) are on the Renaissance; all sections of 3160 (spring semester) are on the Enlightenment.  Students may substitute 3 courses--from ENGL BC3154-BC3158, BC3163-BC3164, BC3165-BC3169, or ENTH V3136-V3137.  Students may also take 1 colloquium and 2 substitutions.  At least one of these courses must cover Medieval or Renaissance material; at least one material of the 17th or 18th Century.  One of these will also count toward satisfying the “before 1900” requirement.  4 points.
Enrollment in 3159 and 3160 is limited to junior and senior English majors.  Signing up will be accomplished through a special tab in eBear.

ENGL BC 3159x (Fall, 2010):

Section 1: The English Colloquium: Imitation and Creation
New ideas of the mind’s relation to the world.  New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style.—R. Hamilton, W 11-12:50.
Section 2: The English Colloquium: Skepticism and Affirmation
The development of modern concepts of subjectivity and authority.  The rise of art and the artist.  Myth versus science.  Knowledge versus experience.  Humanism, Rationalism, Empiricism.  The tension between belief and doubt.  The exploration of limits and the limitless.  Definition of the beautiful and the sublime.—A. Prescott, M 2:10-4.
Section 3: The English Colloquium: Reason and Imagination
Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience.—C. Plotkin, W 4:10-6.
Section 4: The English Colloquium: Order and Disorder
The tension, conflicts, and upheavals of an era in the arts, religion, politics, aesthetics, and society.—A. Guibbory, T 2:10-4.

ENGL BC3160y (Spring, 2011

Section 1: The English Colloquium: Imitation and Creation
New ideas of the mind's relation to the world.  New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style.—J. Basker, M 2:10-4 pm.
Section 2: The English Colloquium: Skepticism and Affirmation
The development of modern concepts of subjectivity and authority.  The rise of art and the artist.  Myth versus science.  Knowledge versus experience.  Humanism, Rationalism, Empiricism.  The tension between belief and doubt.  The exploration of limits and the limitless. Definition of the beautiful and the sublime.—T. Szell, Tu 4:10-6 pm.
Section 3: The English Colloquium: Reason and Imagination
Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience.—C. Plotkin, W 4:10-6 pm.
Section 4: The English Colloquium: Order and Disorder
The tension, conflicts, and upheavals of an era in the arts, religion, politics, aesthetics, and society.—A. Guibbory, Tu 11 am-12:50 pm.


ENGL BC 3163x Shakespeare I
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.–P. Platt, MW 9:10-10:25.  3 points.  Prerequisites: This class is open only to juniors and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 60 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.

ENGL BC 3164y Shakespeare II
Critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.—P. Platt, MW 9:10-10:25 am.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3167x Milton
Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes and selections of Milton’s earlier poetry and prose (defenses of free press, divorce, individual conscience, political and religious liberty) read within the context of religious, political, and cultural history, but with a sense of connection to present issues.—A. Guibbory, T Th 11-12:15.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3168y Lyric Poetry: an Introduction
This course studies the lyric poem (primarily in English and English translation), its forms, features, and sources, its histories and traditions in print from the fourteenth to the twenty-first centuries.  We will review sonnets, ballads, hymns, odes, and elegies; fragments and free verse; the pastoral and its relatives (nature poetry, political poetry); the roles of allusion, metaphor, and figuration.  Formal and historical questions will be central to discussions.—S. Hamilton, MW 2:40-3:55 pm.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3173x 18th-Century Literature (1660-1820)
This course will examine the “rise” of the eighteenth-century British novel from its unruly and disreputable origins to its arrival as a respectable and accepted genre. Along the way we’ll consider how the novel was affected by and effected changes in gender, sexuality, authorship, and political and social institutions. Readings to include Behn, Defoe, Haywood, Richardson, Fielding, Cleland, Sterne, Wollstonecraft, and Austen.—R. Hamilton, T Th 4:10-5:25.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3174x The Age of Johnson
The works of Johnson, Boswell, and their contemporaries in historic context; rise of the novel (Richardson, Fielding, and Sterne); poets from Pope to Blake and Wordsworth; women writers from Carter to Collier to Wollstonecraft; working class writers; topics include slavery and abolition in literature, the democratization of culture, and the transition to romanticism.— J. Basker, MW 9:10-10:25.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3176x The Romantic Era
Romantic writers in their intellectual, historical, and political context, with reference to contemporary movements in philosophy, music, and the plastic arts.  Authors include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats.  An emphasis on close reading of the poetry.—C. Plotkin, T Th 4:10-5:25.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3177y Victorian Age in Literature: the Novel
Works by Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Arthur Conan Doyle.  Attention to form and style in the development of the novel; examination of how the novels reflect or challenge Victorian ideas about ambition, education, labor, gender, domesticity, and global empire.-M. Cregan, TuTh 10:35-11:50 am.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3178y Victorian Poetry and Criticism
Poetry, art, and aesthetics in an industrial society, with emphasis on the role of women as artists and objects. Poems by Tennyson, Arnold, Christina and D.G. Rossetti, Swinburne, and Elizabeth and Robert Browning; criticism by Ruskin, Arnold, and Wilde; paintings by the Pre-Raphaelites and Whistler; photographs by J.M. Cameron.—W. Sharpe, TuTh 4:10-5:25 pm.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited 35 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3179x American Literature to 1800
Early American histories, autobiographies, poems, plays, and novels tell stories of pilgrimage and colonization; private piety and public life; the growth of national identity; Puritanism, Quakerism, and Deism; courtship and marriage; slavery and abolition. Writers include Bradford, Shepard, Bradstreet, Taylor, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Franklin, Woolman, and Brown.—L. Gordis, MW 11-12:15.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3180y American Literature, 1800-1870
Texts from the late Republican period through the Civil War explore the literary implications of American independence, the representation of Native Americans, the nature of the self, slavery and abolition, gender and woman's sphere, and the Civil War.  Writers include Irving, Emerson, Poe, Fuller, Thoreau, Douglass, Stowe, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.—L. Gordis, MW 11 am-12:15 pm.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3181x American Literature, 1871-1945
American literature in the context of cultural and historical change. Writers include Twain, James, DuBois, Wharton, Cather, Wister, Faulkner, Hurston.—J. Kassanoff, T Th 10:35-11:50.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3183y American Literature since 1945
American fiction, literary and cultural criticism since 1945. Topics include: the authorial and critical search for the great contemporary American novel, the particularity of "American" characters, genres, aesthetics, subjects, the effect of these debates on canon formation and the literary marketplace. Authors may include: Bellow, Ellison, Nabokov, Kerouac, Didion, Pynchon, Morrison, and Lahiri.—M. Vandenburg, TuTh 2:40-3:55 pm.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3185x Modern British and American Poetry
Poetry written in English during the past century, discussed in the context of modernism, postmodernism, literary theory, and changing social and technological developments. Students will participate in shaping the syllabus and leading class discussion. Authors may include Yeats, Williams, Eliot, Moore, Bishop, Rich, Ginsberg, Stevens, O' Hara, Plath, Brooks, Jordan, Walcott, Alexie, and many others. – W. Sharpe, T Th 4:10-5:25.   3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.


ENGL BC 3191x and y The English Conference: The Lucyle Hook Guest Lectureship
Various topics presented by visiting scholars in courses that will meet for two to four weeks during each semester. Topics, instructors, and times will be announced by the department. Students must attend all classes to receive credit for this course. For more information, please consult the English Department's web page (http://barnard.edu/english). 1 point.  Prerequisites: To be taken only for P/F.  You must attend all four class meetings in order to receive credit for this course.  Enrollment limited to 60 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.

FALL 2010: Words and Music
The course will focus, on the one hand, on the way composers and songwriters have responded to words and, on the other, on the way authors have tried to describe music in words. We will study the creative method of musicians ranging from John Dowland and Richard Wagner to Bob Dylan and Suzanne Vega. Among the authors discussed will be Thomas Campion, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Eduard Hanslick, George Bernard Shaw, Christopher Ricks, Susan Youens, and Anthony DeCurtis. Special guests will speak and perform. No knowledge of musical notation is needed.—Erik Ryding & Rebecca Pechefsky, T 4:10-6 (on October 5th, 12th, 19th, an 26th).
SPRING 2011: Just Letters: Poets in Correspondence
This series of lectures will pursue the implications of Bishop’s notion of letters as 'an art form' by reflecting on the relationship between poets’ letters and the primary 'art form' of poetry in the modern period.  Auden said 'The mere fact that a man is famous and dead does not entitle us to read, still less to publish, his private correspondence,' but Richard Howard argued that 'a poet's letters constitute a crucial dimension of the poet.'  The dialogue between poems and letters takes many different forms, and many poets, including John Keats, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost, not only circulated poems in their letters to friends, but sketched out their poetics in letters.  Starting with a reflection on 'T.S. Eliot and the Use of Letters,' the lectures will look at a number of twentieth-century poets, including Bishop, Lowell, Marianne Moore, Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath, and Philip Larkin, and seek to develop something on the lines of an epistolary poetics.  In engaging with the ways modern poets' talk about poetry in their correspondence, the lectures will also pursue the aesthetics of letter-writing, and consider the bearing of letters on lyrics (and vice versa).—Hugh Haughton, MW 4:10-6:00 (on April 4th, 6th, 11th, and 13th).

ENGL BC 3193x and y: Critical Writing
(Formerly called Literary Criticism & Theory.)  Provides experience in the reading and analysis of literary texts and some knowledge of conspicuous works of literary criticism. Frequent short papers. Required of all majors before the end of the junior year.  Sophomores are encouraged to take it in the spring term even before officially declaring their major.  Transfer students should plan to take BC3193 in the autumn term.  Registration in each section is limited.  Departmental registration required.  4 points.

Fall, 2010:
Section 1: Th 4:10-6 — C. Brown
Section 2: T 11-12:50 — M. Cregan
Section 3: W 4:10-6 — T. Szell
Section 4: M 2:10-4 — M. Spiegel
Section 5: W 11-12:50     S. Pedatella
Spring, 2011:
Section 1: Th 4:10–6 pm — M. Vandenburg
Section 2: Tu 4:10-6 pm — C. Plotkin
Section 3: W 11 am-12:50 pm — J. Pagano
Section 4: W 2:10-4 pm — W. Sharpe
Section 5: Th 11-12:50 pm — B. Abu-Manneh

ENGL BC 3194.2x: Critical & Theoretical Perspectives on Lit.: Literary Theory
Examines nineteenth century foundational texts (Marx, Freud, Nietzsche), landmarks of the twentieth century (Gramsci, Foucault, Deleuze, Butler, Jameson, Spillers, Said, Spivak, Anzaldua, Debray, Kelly, Rafael), the novels of Jose Rizal, and selected critical essays.—J. Beller.  M 4:10-6.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3195x Modernism
Modernist responses to cultural fragmentation and gender anxiety in the wake of psychoanalysis and world war.  Works by Woolf, Joyce, Yeats, Eliot, Stein, Hemingway, Toomer, H.D., Pound, Lawrence, Barnes, and other Anglo-American writers.—M. Vandenburg.  T Th 2:40-3:55.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3196x Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
Explores the cultural contexts and aesthetic debates surrounding the Harlem or New Negro literary renaissance, 1920-30s. Through fiction, poetry, essays, and artwork, topics considered include: modernism, primitivism, patronage, passing and the problematics of creating racialized art in/for a community comprised of differences in gender, class, sexuality, and geographical origin.—M. Miller. T Th 10:35-11:50.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3252x Contemporary Media Theory
Explores the transformation of social organization and consciousness by and as media technologies during the long 20th century. Students will read influential works of media analysis written during the past century, analyze film and digital media, and explore political and media theory generated since the rise of the internet.—J. Beller.  M 11-12:50.  Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  Attend first class for instructor permission.  4 points.

AFEN BC 3525y The West Indies and the Atlantic World
This course examines the literature of transatlantic travel from Columbus's first voyage in 1492 to Caryl Phillip's recent re-tracing of his mother's migration in The Atlantic Sound (2000) to recent re-imaginings of slavery and the Middle Passage by M. Nourbese Philip and Marlon James.  Even before Columbus's first encounter, the "Indies" sparked English desires for riches and adventure.  We will first investigate how writers promoted an idea of the West Indies and then came to inhabit its heterogeneous spaces, filling them with longing and anxiety.  The class will chart the emergence of modern race thinking from the rich interaction of peoples and goods in the early modern Caribbean.  We will also question how ideals of freedom and "English-ness" co-existed with slavery, bondage and creole life.  The class will then look at the ways later writers revisit the Caribbean's colonial origins and discuss how notions of the West Indies may haunt modern Atlantic travel.—K. Hall, W 4:10–6 pm.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students. Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.  4 points

ENRE BC 3810y Literary Approaches to the Bible
Interpretive strategies for reading the Bible as a work with literary dimensions.  Considerations of poetic and rhetorical structures, narrative techniques, and feminist exegesis will be included.  Topics for investigation include the influence of the Bible on literature.—M. Ellsberg, Th 2:10–4 pm.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Only registering for the course through eBear or SSOL will not ensure your enrollment.  4 points

PREFACE for 3996: All independent study projects require a completed form being filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall).  The form can be printed out from the department website and is also available at the Department Office.

ENGL BC 3996x and y Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation
Senior majors who are concentrating in Theatre or Writing and have completed two courses in writing or three in theatre will normally take the Special Project in Theatre or Writing (BC3996 x or y) in combination with an additional course in their special field.  This counts in place of one of the Senior Seminars.  In certain cases, Independent Study (BC3999 - see below) may be substituted for the Special Project.  Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and chair required.  In rare cases, with the permission of the chair, a special project in conjunction with a course may be taken by other English majors.  1 point.


PREFACE FOR THE ENGLISH SENIOR SEMINARS:
Enrollment in 3997 and 3998 is limited to senior English majors (and film majors for the English/film section).  Signing up is accomplished through a special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to seniors.  4 points.

ENGL 3997x (Fall, 2010):

Section 1: Senior Seminars: On Happiness
Concepts of happiness as they apply to various novels and novellas from the 18th century to the present.—M. Jaanus, T 6:10-8.
Section 2: Senior Seminars: Romance
Romance is the most persistent and widespread kind of writing in the west, from high culture to low, yet it fits awkwardly into the critical modes we encounter in the university.  This seminar explores the form from antiquity to recent film.  One brief paper (two to three pages) per week.—C. Baswell, W 9-10:50.
Section 3: Science Fiction
Course description TBA. —R. Hamilton, W 4:10-6.
Section 4: Senior Seminars: Poets & their Correspondence
How do poets' letters inform our understanding of their poetry? From the eighteenth to the twentieth century, poets have used their intimate correspondence to "baffle absence," as Coleridge remarked.  This course will examine the ways several masters of the letter (including Cowper, Keats, Dickinson, Eliot, Bishop, and Lowell, among others) shaped their prose to convey spontaneity in paradoxically artful ways, illuminating their major work as poets and making the private letter a literary form in its own right.—S. Hamilton, T 4:10-6.
Section 5: Senior Seminars: Black Literature Now: Contemporary African American Literature and Post-Racial Ideologies
Examines contemporary African American literature, in particular the ways in which recent authors are reconceiving literary notions of blackness.  Beginning in the 1980s with the emergence of "post-soul" literature, this class explores the ways in which authors one or two generations after the Civil Rights Movement reconfigure their sense of racial "belonging" and notions of how to write "blackness" into a text.  Authors may include Ellis, Whitehead, Southgate, Everett, Senna, Sapphire, Beatty, Toure, Packer, Johnson and Morrison.—M. Miller.  Th 2:10-4:10.

Section 6: Senior Seminars: Political Love
A philosophical exploration of notions of 'political love' from Aristotle's happiness to Martin Luther King's agape. In what way is love the foundation of human community, and what is a revolutionary conception of love today?—B. Abu-Manneh.  T 2:10-4.

ENGL 3998y (Spring, 2011):

Section 1: Sexuality, Spirituality, and Sin
The first half of the course is grounded in readings from Bible, Augustine, Petrarch and Donne, but students may then explore the relation and intersection between sexuality, sin, and spirituality up into the present, and cross-culturally.—A. Guibbory, W 2:10–4 pm.
Section 2: Film: The Man in the Crowd/The Woman of the Streets
Explores theories and representations of the crowd, mass behavior and ideas about the individual in the period between the two World Wars.  Looking mostly at fiction and film from the U.S. and Germany between 1918 -1939, the course centers on representations of Berlin and New York.  Films by Lang, Ruttmann, Rosselini, Wenders, Von Sternberg, Vidor, Chaplin, Sheeler and Strand, Engel, Berkeley and others.—M. Spiegel, Th 2:10–4 pm.
Section 3: Studies in Literature: Sense and Disability
American narratives of disability at the turn of the twentieth century with special attention to gender, race, class, technology and law.  Authors include Stephen Crane, Helen Keller, Edith Wharton, Pearl Buck, Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner.—J. Kassanoff, Tu 11 am-12:50 pm.
Section 4: Modernism in the Making: Origins & Achievements
It is customary to think of modernism as a revolt against "the Victorians."  Modernists themselves are our authority for this view.  This course will examine both the revolutions in form and thought that mark the period and the deep continuities that run from the mid-nineteenth into the first third of the twentieth century.  The first half of the term will be taken up with major texts of the period in various genres; in the second, texts proposed by seminar members will form the focus of discussion.—C. Plotkin, Th 4:10–6 pm.
Section 5: Late Victorian and Modern Drama
Drama in transition. Changing social structures and dramatic structures at the turn of the century. The relationship between convention and invention and the interface of text and performance in the plays of Pinero, Wilde, Shaw, Strindberg, Ibsen, Chekhov, Robins, and others.—P. Denison, W 11 am-12:50 pm.
Section 6: Modernist Visions: Conrad, Eliot, Woolf
Themes of the heart of darkness, the waste land, and voyages, in the first decades of the 20th century. London; overseas; gender divisions; fragmentation and reconstruction.—C. Brown, W 4:10–6 pm.


PREFACE for 3999: All independent study projects require a completed form being filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall).  The form can be printed out from the Department website (www.barnard.edu/english) and is also available at the Department Office.

ENGL BC 3999x and y Independent Study
Senior majors who wish to substitute Independent Study for one of the two required senior seminars should consult the chair. Permission is given rarely and only to students who present a clear and well-defined topic of study, who have a department sponsor, and who submit their proposals well in advance of the semester in which they will register.  There is no independent study for screenwriting or film production.  Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Department Chair.  4 points

Cross-Listed Courses

taught by Barnard English faculty

English & Comparative Literature

ENGL W4670x American Film Genres—M. Spiegel.

G4995x Special Topics in Modern Literature: Reading Lacan —M. Jaanus.

American Studies

AMST W 1010y Introduction to American Studies: Major Themes in the American Experience—M. Spiegel.


page last updated 5/16/11