2014-2015

Introductory
 

ENGL BC1201x and y First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History
Prerequisites: Required for all first-year students. Enrollment restricted to Barnard. May not be taken for P/D/F. Consult department website and bulletin board for section times.See course website http://firstyear.barnard.edu/rlh for more information.
Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. Sections of the course are grouped in three clusters: I. Legacy of the Mediterranean; II. The Americas; III. Women and Culture. The first cluster features a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture. Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of canonicity, the last two clusters feature curricula that explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in culture.
3 points

 

ENGL BC1204x First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History (Workshop)

Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. Sections will focus on Legacy of the Mediterranean or The Americas and meet three times a week. For more information on the curriculum, please visit the Course Website http://firstyear.barnard.edu/rlh.
4 points

 

FALL 

Section 1         MWF 10:10-11:25      M. Kolisnyk
Section 2         TRF 10:10-11:25         W. Schor-Haim
Section 3         TRF 1:10-2:25             S. Fredman
Section 4         TRF 8:40-9:55             V. Condillac

 

Writing
 

ENGL BC3101x The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit.

Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring.
—P. Cobrin, TR 11:40-12:55
3 points

 

 

ENGL BC3102x Academic Writing Intensive
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 8 students. Nomination and instructor's permission required. Academic Writing Intensive is an intensive writing course for second-year Barnard students. Students will attend a weekly seminar and schedule an individual 30-minute conference with the instructor every other week. This focused, individual attention to a student's writing is designed to help the student strengthen her critical thinking, reading and writing skills.
—W. Schor-Haim, T 2:10- 4:00
4 points

 

ENGL BC3103 The Art of the Essay
Prerequisites: Can count towards major. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups
(Formerly called Essay Writing.) English composition above the first-year level. Techniques of argument and effective expression. Weekly papers. Individual conferences. Some sections have a special focus, as described.
3 points


FALL
Section 1 T 12:10-2:00 A. Schneider
Section 2 R 2:10-4 W. Schor-Haim
Section 3 T 2:10-4 P. Ellsberg
SPRING

Section 1 T 10:10-12 A. Schneider
Section 2 W 2:10-4 S. Fredman

Section 3 R 2:10-4 W. Schor-Haim

 

Creative Writing
 

ENGL BC3105x Fiction and Personal Narrative
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms

Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing.
—T. Szell, W 4:10-6
3 points

 

ENGL BC3106y Fiction and Personal Narrative
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms

In this workshop we will read across genre works of formally inventive and exciting prose, by writers such as Claudia Rankine, Jean Rhys, Lydia Davis, and Junot Diaz. Whether you are writing from an autobiographical impulse or from the realm of invention, I hope to help you push your texts to their vibrant full potential. Not only will we discuss traditional craft in this workshop, but we will also develop an innovative vocabulary to describe the work you’re reading and writing. Open to anyone willing to read, write, and rewrite adventurously.
—K. Zambreno, W 4:10-6
3 points

 

ENGL BC3107x Introduction to Fiction Writing
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms

Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.
—D. Smith, R 4:10-6
3 points

 

ENGL BC3108y Introduction to Fiction Writing
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms

The best stories and novels are, in Francine Prose’s words, “private lessons in the art of fiction,” and with this in mind, I will assign weekly readings in fiction, as well as poetry, with related writing prompts and exercises. In addition to weekly reading and writing assignments, and workshop discussion, students will be required to keep a journal, filling pages and pages with overheard language, story ideas, descriptions of place and actions, and instances of the “everyday surreal.” The purpose of the journal-writing is both to sharpen students’ powers of observation, and to come to recognize that material for astonishing fiction is all around us. Students will conceive and begin to fashion original stories, poems, and, if they wish, chapters and outlines for longer works.
—M. Field, R 12:10-2
3 points

ENGL BC3110x and y Introduction to Poetry Writing
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques.
FALL : J. Greenbaum, T 4:10-6:00 SPRING: S. Hamilton, 
W 11-12:50
3 points

 

ENGL BC3113x Playwriting I
Prerequisites: Open only to Juniors and Seniors. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here:

http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms

A workshop to provoke and investigate dramatic writing.
—E. McLaughlin, M 4:10-6
3 points

 

ENGL BC3114y Playwriting II
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms

Workshop to facilitate the crafting of a dramatic play with a bent towards the full-length form. NOTE: Playwriting I (ENGL BC3113) is NOT a prerequisite, and students need not have written a play before.
—K. Tolan, R 4:10-6
3 points

 

ENGL BC 3115x Story Writing I
Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.
—M. Keane, W 2:10-4
3 points

 

ENGL BC3116y Story Writing II
Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.
—M. Gordon, T 6:10-8
3 points

 

ENGL BC3117x Fiction Writing
Previous experience or introductory class strongly recommended. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms
Assignments designed to examine form and structure in fiction.
—H. Matar, R 4:10-6
3 points

 

ENGL BC3118x Advanced Poetry Writing I
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms

Weekly workshops designed to critique new poetry. Each participant works toward the development of a cohesive collection of poems. Short essays on traditional and contemporary poetry will also be required.
—S. Hamilton, W 11:00-12:50.
3 points

 

ENGL BC3120x Creative Non-Fiction
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms
The aim of this creative nonfiction workshop is to write essays that use the self as an instrument for rendering the world, with a focus on "the portrait"—of self, other, place, time. We will look at essays as illumination, provocation, persuasion, and pleasure. Students will explore and define for themselves the limits and liberties of creative nonfiction, a genre that combines fact with the imagination, objective "truth" with personal (and thus subjective) perception. The elements of fiction-scene-setting, dialogue, characterization, story-telling, conflict, surprise, pacing, exposition-animate the best creative non-fiction, and we'll study these tools as we explore new material, try out new ideas, and develop the habits of art. Students will be encouraged to hone their powers of observation, to choose subjects that are of interest to them, and to respond personally, actively, emotionally, and intellectually to the world around them, translating this engagement into language that will, in turn, engage a reader. To this end we will write often, both in and out of class, reading the work of our predecessors and contemporaries to see how they practice the craft.
—C. Barnett, R 11-12:50

3 points

 

ENGL BC3120.2y Creative Non-Fiction: Making Facts Sing
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms
This course will challenge students to take on what are considered difficult topics in science and math and create convincing and clear narratives therefrom. We will read works by John McPhee, Sylvia Nasar, Natalie Angier, Oliver Sacks, and others. Through interviews and iterative writing exercises, students will learn how to breathe life into complex material.
—A. Horowitz, T 10:10-12
3 points

ENGL BC3120.3y Creative Non-Fiction: Gendered Memoir
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms
A workshop in writing short autobiographical story with particular attention to the role gender plays in shaping experience. Focus on student writing, along with readings from the work of Augusten Buroughs; Alice Sebold; Alison Bechdel; Mary Karr, and others.
—J. Boylan, W 12:10-2
3 points
 

ENGL BC3125y Advanced Poetry Writing II
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms
A further study of poetic practice for committed student-writers with experience in writing and reading poems. In the classroom, student poems and ideas about poetics are shared, questioned, and critiqued. There will also be readings in and critical interpretation of traditional and contemporary poetry.
—S. Hamilton, W 9-10:50

3 points

ENGL BC3126y Advanced Projects in Prose Writing
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms
Independent projects in imaginative writing in prose, including the genres of fiction, nonfiction, memoir, novellas, inter-related stories, and others. Class meetings consist of a few initial lectures on narrative followed by workshops focused on student writing in progress.
—J. Boylan, T 12:10-2
3 points

 

ENGL BC3121x and y Public Speaking
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
This course will introduce you to principles of effective public speaking and debate, and provide practical opportunities to use these principles in structured speaking situations. You will craft and deliver speeches, engage in debates and panel discussions, analyze historical and contemporary speakers, and reflect on your own speeches and those of your classmates. You will explore and practice different rhetorical strategies with an emphasis on information, persuasion and argumentation. For each speaking assignment, you will go through the speech-making process, from audience analysis, purpose and organization, to considerations of style and delivery. The key criteria in this course are content, organization, and adaptation to the audience and purpose. While this is primarily a performance course, you will be expected to participate extensively as a listener and critic, as well as a speaker.
—D. Kempf, TR 11:40-12:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3123x Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit. Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.
Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program.
—P. Cobrin & D. Kempf, MW 10:10-11:25

3 points

Theatre

There were no English-Theatre courses (ENTH) will be offered through the English Department in Fall 2014 or Spring 2015.

Language and Literature
 

ENGL BC 3097x The English Conference (Fall 2014): "The City in American Literature"
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60. PLEASE NOTE that in the fall 2014 semester, there will NOT be a departmental sign-up sheet for this class. Barnard students must register for this course through the Registrar’s L-course process.

This course will explore the representation of the city (New York, Paris) in the American novel. A first session will be dedicated to a theoretical introduction. With references to some major critics (Barthes, Benjamin, Certeau, Derrida, Sansot...), we will focus on the transformation of the description from a panoramic, omniscient perspective to a mobile, labyrinthine, fragmentary perception. The motif of walking will be evoked as a means of rediscovering the historical, cultural or social evolution of the city, but also of rehabilitating the wonders of the ordinary. We will also dwell on some of the ways in which novelists reinvent language in order to translate the ceaseless transformation or the Babel-like multiplicity of urban space. The next sessions will focus on the representation of the city in some specific novels (with a close analysis of some extracts): Stephen Crane's Maggie, Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, John Dos Passos's Manhattan Transfer, Paul Auster's Moon Palace.
—Nathalie Cochoy, WR 12:10-2 on October 29th & 30th and November 5th & 6th.

1 point

 

ENGL BC3098y The English Conference (Spring 2015): Children’s Literature and the Idea of the Child
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students. To be taken only for P/F. Students must attend all classes to receive credit for this course. Please consult this page of the English Department website for more information: http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/english_conference
Children’s literature not only entertains and educates children, it helps define them. In this course we will examine classics of children’s literature from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland to Harry Potter and beyond, analyzing the ways in which childhood is both depicted and constructed by the only serious literary genre defined by its audience. Topics will include class, race, innocence, nature, and the domestic as categories that both define and exclude children at different times. Authors may include Lewis Carroll, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Maurice Sendak, J. M. Barrie, J. K. Rowling, Mary Hoffman, Walter Dean Myers, and Kiese Laymon.
—Visiting Prof. Elisabeth Rose Gruner, MT 4:10-6 on Feb. 23, 24 and Mar. 9, 10

1 point

 

ENGL BC3129x Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups
Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered.
—Q. Prettyman, TR 1:10-2:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3130y The American Cowboy and the Iconography of the West
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students.
We will consider the image and role of the cowboy in fiction, social history, film, music, and art. Readings will include Cormac McCarthy's "The Border Trilogy."
—P. Ellsberg, MW 1:10-2:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3133 Early Modern Women Writers
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students.
Despite popular conceptions insisting that the ideal Renaissance woman was silent, as well as chaste and obedient, many women in the early modern period (c. 1550-1800) defied such sentiments by writing, circulating and publishing their own literature. Under the influence of humanism, a generation of educated women arose who would become both the audience for and contributors to the great flowering of literature written in sixteenth and seventeenth century England. As we examine how these women addressed questions of love, marriage, age, race and class, we will also consider the roles women and ideas about gender played in the production of English literature. We will read from a range of literary (plays & poetry) and non-literary (cookbooks, broadside, midwifery books) texts. Seminar participants will be asked to circulate a formal paper for peer review and complete two digital projects.
—K. Hall, W 11-12:50

4 points

ENGL BC3141x Major English Texts I
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Autumn: Beowulf through Johnson. Guest lectures by members of the department.
—P. Ellsberg, MW 2:40-3:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3142y Major English Texts II
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 40 students.
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Spring: Romantic poets through the present.
—P. Ellsberg, MW 2:40-3:55
3 points

 

AFEN BC3146y Resisting Stereotypy, Resisting the Spectral Self: African Diasporic Counter Images
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students.
“Sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never hurt...” Well. Hmm. This course focuses on theories of stereotypy and its mechanisms. We engage visual images (cinematographic, photographic and painterly) and print culture (novels, poems) that traffic in stereotypes and we consider resistances to these. We read comparatively across African American, African diasporic and African works. We do so by considering the arenas in which stereotyping practices and resistances to do battle: the public sphere and the private, the national and transnational/global. Our readings consider the psychic, political and economic violences of stereotypy as race, gender, sexuality, class, religion and nationality are invoked and manipulated.
—Y. Christiansë, R 11-12:50
4 points

 

ENGL BC3147y Introduction to Narrative Medicine
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Open only to undergraduate students.
Narrative Medicine was designed to give doctors and healthcare professionals a more profound understanding of, and empathy for, the experience of illness. It teaches how to listen and what to listen for. While the skills developed are directly applicable to the practice of medicine, they are also important in any field in which human relationships are central: business, law, architecture, social work, and the creative arts. The multidisciplinary course entails a rigorous integration of didactic and experiential methodology to develop a heightened awareness of self and others and build a practical set of narrative competencies.
—C. Friedman & R. Jones, T 11-12:50
4 points

AFEN BC3148y Literature of the Great Migration: 1916-1970
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.
Explores, through fiction, poetry, essays, and film, the historical context and cultural content of the African American migration from the rural south to the urban cities of the north, with particular emphasis on New York, Chicago, Detroit, and Philadelphia.
—Q. Prettyman, TR 1:10-2:25
3 points

 

ENGL BC3155x The Canterbury Tales
Chaucer as inheritor of late-antique and medieval conventions and founder of early modern literature and the fiction of character. Selections from related medieval texts.
—C. Baswell, MW 4:10-5:25

3 points

 

BC 3159-3160 - THE ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM PREFACE:
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Required of all English majors in their junior year. Sign up is accomplished through the "JR Colloquium" section of myBarnard.

All sections of 3159 (fall semester) are on the Renaissance; all sections of 3160 (spring semester) are on the Enlightenment.
4 points

 

ENGL BC3159/3160:
 

Section 1: Imitation and Creation
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "JR Colloquium" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors.
New ideas of the mind's relation to the world. New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style.
FALL: A. Prescott, M 2:10-4 SPRING: A. Schneider, R 2:10-4

 

Section 2: Skepticism and Affirmation
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "JR Colloquium" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors.
The development of modern concepts of subjectivity and authority. The rise of art and the artist. Myth versus science. Knowledge versus experience. Humanism, Rationalism, Empiricism. The tension between belief and doubt. The exploration of limits and the limitless. Definition of the beautiful and the sublime.
FALL: M. Jaanus, M 11-12:50 SPRING: M. Jaanus T 12:10-2

 

Section 3: Reason and Imagination
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "JR Colloquium" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors.
Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience.
FALL: A. Guibbory, W 11-12:50 SPRING: A. Guibbory, R 11-12:50

 

Section 4: Order and Disorder
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "JR Colloquium" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors.
The tension, conflicts, and upheavals of an era in the arts, religion, politics, aesthetics, and society.
FALL: R. Eisendrath, W 4:10-6 SPRING: T.Szell W 4:10-6

 

ENGL BC3163x Shakespeare I
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students. This class is open to Juniors and Seniors ONLY. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.
—R. Eisendrath, TR 4:10-5:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3164y Shakespeare II
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students.

Critical and historical introduction to selected comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances by Shakespeare.
—A. Prescott, MW 1:10-2:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3167y Milton
Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes and selections of Milton's earlier poetry and prose (defenses of free press, divorce, individual conscience, political and religious liberty) read within the context of religious, political, and cultural history, but with a sense of connection to present issues.
—A. Guibbory, TR 2:40-3:55

3 points


ENGL BC3180y American Literature, 1800-1870
Texts from the late Republican period through the Civil War explore the literary implications of American independence, the representation of Native Americans, the nature of the self, slavery and abolition, gender and woman's sphere, and the Civil War. Writers include Irving, Emerson, Poe, Fuller, Thoreau, Douglass, Stowe, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.
—L. Gordis, MW 2:40-3:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3181x American Literature, 1871-1945
American literature in the context of cultural and historical change. Writers include Twain, James, DuBois, Wharton, Cather, Wister, Faulkner, Hurston.
—J. Kassanoff, TR 11:40-12:55

3 points 

 

ENGL BC3183y American Literature since 1945
Enrollment limited to 40 students.
This course presents a survey of American fiction, literary and cultural criticism since 1945, with special attention paid to interrogating the concept of “Americanness” as both a subject for fiction and as a category around which “canon” formation takes place. Topics and questions we will consider include: Is there a “great” contemporary American novel? What does/would it look like and who decides? Are there recognizable “American” characters, genres, aesthetics, subjects? Authors may include Bellow, Ellison, Nabokov, Kerouac, Didion, Pynchon, and Morrison.
—M. Miller, MW 10:10-11:25
3 points

ENGL BC3187y American Writers and Their Foreign Counterparts
Developments in modern literature as seen in selected 19th- and 20th-century American, European, and English works by Flaubert, James, Proust, Joyce, Chekhov, Porter, Cather, Ibsen, O'Neill, Fitzgerald, Rilke, and others.
—M. Gordon, MW 11:40-12:55
3 points

ENGL BC3189y Postmodernism
This course considers how Postmodernism’s profound distrust of language and narrative transforms the form and function of literature. Writers include Pynchon, Barthelme, Robinson, Didion, Morrison, Ishiguro, DeLillo, Coetzee, and Hejinian.
—M. Vandenburg, TR 2:40-3:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3192x Exile and Estrangement in Global Literature
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups
This course examines the experiential life of the novelist as both artist and citizen. Through a diverse selection of global novels and novellas, we will investigate the seemingly contradictory condition of the novelist as both outsider and integral to society, as both observer and expresser of society's yearnings and passions. We will look at how women and men, from different countries and epochs, have addressed the issues of social and political alienation, national crisis, and individual narrative voice. The main objective is to pinpoint, through close reading and open discussion, connections between novelistic form, national time and social conjuncture. The uniqueness of the novels we read lies not just in their articulation of a historical moment or in their response to national myth, but in their resistance to generalization. We will examine how our novelists' aesthetic figuration, as both witnesses and participants, creates an opportunity for fiction to reveal more than the author intends and, on the other hand, more than what power desires.
—H. Matar, F 4:10-6

4 points

 

ENGL BC3193x and y Critical Writing
Prerequisites: Open only to Barnard students. Enrollment limited to 10 students.
Provides experience in the reading and analysis of literary texts and some knowledge of conspicuous works of literary criticism. Frequent short papers. Required of all English majors before the end of the junior year. Sophomores are encouraged to take it in the spring semester even before officially declaring their major. Transfer students should plan to take it in the fall semester.
4 points

FALL

Section 1      R 9-10:50        W. Sharpe
Section 2     T 11-12:50      M. Cregan

Section 3     R 4:10-6          A. Lynn

Section 4     M 2:10-4         M. Spiegel

Section 5     R 12:10-2        T. Szell

SPRING

Section 1     R 2:10-4          K. Levin
Section 2    W 11-12:50     J. Pagano

Section 3    M 12:00-1:50  S. Pedatella

Section 4    T 4:10-6          R. Eisendrath

Section 5    W 4:10-6         A. Lynn

 

ENGL BC3195 Modernism
Modernist responses to cultural fragmentation and gender anxiety in the wake of psychoanalysis and world war. Works by Woolf, Joyce, Yeats, Eliot, Stein, Hemingway, Toomer, H.D., Pound, Lawrence, Barnes, and other Anglo-American writers.
—M. Vandenburg, TR 2:40-3:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3196x Home to Harlem: Literature of Harlem
Explores the cultural contexts and aesthetic debates surrounding the Harlem or New Negro literary renaissance, 1920-30s. Through fiction, poetry, essays, and artwork, topics considered include: modernism, primitivism, patronage, passing and the problematics of creating racialized art in/for a community comprised of differences in gender, class, sexuality, and geographical origin.
—M. Miller, MW 10:10-11:25.

3 points


ENGL BC3252x Contemporary Media Theory
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.
Explores the transformation of social organization and consciousness by and as media technologies during the long 20th century. Students will read influential works of media analysis written during the past century, analyze film and digital media, and explore political and media theory generated since the rise of the internet.
—J. Beller, M 11-12:50

4 point

 

ENRE BC3810y Literary Approaches to the Bible
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students.
Interpretive strategies for reading the Bible as a work with literary dimensions. Considerations of poetic and rhetorical structures, narrative techniques, and feminist exegesis will be included. Topics for investigation include the influence of the Bible on literature.
—P. Ellsberg, T 2:10-4
4 points

 

ENGL W4995x Reading Lacan
An intensive reading of selections from Lacan's Seminar VI: Desire and Its Interpretation with Shakespeare's Hamlet; Seminar VII: The Ethics of Psychoanalysis with Sophocles's Antigone; Seminar VIII: The Transference with Plato's Symposium; and Seminar XX: Encore: On Feminine Sexuality: The Limits of Love and Knowledge with Clarice Lispector and Marguerite Duras. Emphasis on the relevance of Lacan's thought to contemporary literature, culture, and neuroscience, and to questions about happiness, democracy, and peace.
—M. Jaanus, T 11:00-12:50 (time to be confirmed, check CU Directory)

3 points

 

ENGL BC3996 Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Department Chair required. In rare cases, with the permission of the Chair, a special project in conjunction with a course may be taken English majors who are not concentrating in Theatre or Writing. An Independent Study Form for BC 3996 must be filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall) in order to generate a call number. The form can be printed out from the department website http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms and is also available at the Department Office.
Senior majors who are concentrating in Theatre or Writing and have completed two courses in writing or three in theatre will normally take the Special Project in Theatre or Writing in combination with an additional course in their special field. This counts in place of one of the Senior Seminars. In certain cases, Independent Study may be substituted for the Special Project.

 

ENGL BC3997x:

 

Section 1: Home & Away: Encounters with the Self in Other Places
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
This course draws upon a range of narrative forms, official and archival materials, film and other visual arts and record to consider how explorers, colonial settlers and officials, colonized peoples, refugees and migrants articulate the encounter between what they think they know of themselves and what they are forced to confront in themselves when away from home, or when home is disrupted by strangers who arrive with sets of presumptions and assumptions that become law and policy. Our readings will engage questions about dominance, resistance, hegemony and narration.
—Y. Christiansë, R 11-12:50

 

Section 2: John Donne
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
This course is devoted to one of the greatest writers of love poetry and devotional poetry, John Donne His intense, witty writing has had a long afterlife, influencing writers from George Herbert and John Suckling (in the seventeenth century) to Coleridge in the nineteenth)  to T.S. Eliot, Elizabeth Bishop, Anthony Hecht, and A. S. Byatt (in the twentieth).  We will read Donne’s poetry (The Songs and Sonets, and Holy Sonnets and other poems)—his exploration of sex and love, death and God, doubt and faith-- but also his later Devotions, his prose meditations  on his near-fatal sickness, a text still relevant as he struggles to understand the physical, psychological, and spiritual aspects of illness.  We also will read “friends” of Donne—other writers who have been influenced by Donne, and whose writing is in conversation with him.  Among those we might read are:  George Herbert (along with Donne, the best seventeenth-century writer of religious lyrics), other seventeenth-century poets taken by Donne’s erotic poetry (Suckling, Rochester, both of whom tend towards the obscene), a few poems by Elizabeth Bishop, Anthony Hecht, and Robert Hass, late twentieth-century plays Wallace Shawn (The Designated Mourner) and Margaret Edson (Wit)--plays that “stage” Donne in different ways);  A. S. Byatt’s novel Possession.   We can’t cover all these in the senior seminar, but this list gives an idea of the rich possibilities of the topic.  The course aims to get students to understand Donne’s poetry, and have a sense of how later writers have understood Donne and been in conversation with him.
—A. Guibbory, T 11-12:50

 

Section 3: Poets and Correspondences
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.  
How do poets' letters inform our understanding of their poetry? From the eighteenth to the twentieth century, poets have used their intimate correspondence to "baffle absence," as Coleridge remarked. This course will examine the ways several masters of the letter (including Cowper, Keats, Dickinson, Eliot, Bishop, and Lowell, among others) shaped their prose to convey spontaneity in paradoxically artful ways, illuminating their major work as poets and making the private letter a literary form in its own right.
—S. Hamilton, W 9-10:50

 

Section 4: Charles Dickens
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
Charles Dickens: the life, the works, the legend, in as much detail as we can manage in one semester. Reading will include Pickwick Papers, A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield, Bleak House, and selections from his friend John Forster's Life of Charles Dickens, as well as other works to be chosen by the class. Special emphasis will be given to Dickens's literary style and genius for characterization, in the context of Victorian concerns about money, class, gender, and the role of art in an industrializing society. Students will be expected to share in creating the syllabus, presenting new material, and leading class discussion. Be prepared to do a LOT of reading--all of it great!—plus weekly writing on Courseworks.
—W. Sharpe, R 2:10-4:00


Section 5: Masterpieces

Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors
In light of grand narratives and their discontents, this course questions whether tragic inevitability is really inevitable. Authors include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Stoppard, Barthelme, Baldwin, Didion, Coetzee, Robinson, Kincaid, Rushdie, Bishop, and Hejinian.
—M. Vandenburg, W 11-12:50

 

Section 6: "a d--d mob of scribbling women": Nineteenth-century American Women Writers
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
In 1855, Nathaniel Hawthorne complained that American publishing was "wholly given over to a d--d mob of scribbling women," and that he could not hope to compete with women writers for popularity or sales.  Yet Hawthorne's texts were canonized as American classics, while texts by nineteenth-century women writers were largely ignored by the academy until late in the twentieth century.  This course considers a variety of texts by nineteenth-century American women, including novels, short fiction, poetry, and journalism. We'll consider women's writing and women's reading through a variety of lenses, including domesticity and women's sphere, political action and suffrage, the economics of writing and publishing, sentimentality and anger, and canon formation and literary merit.  Authors include Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Louisa May Alcott, Fanny Fern, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Susan Warner, Harriet Jacobs, Elizabeth Drew Stoddard, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Nellie Bly, and Emily Dickinson.
—L. Gordis, T 2:10-4

 

ENGL BC3998y:

 

Section 1: On Happiness
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
Concepts of happiness as they apply to various novels and novellas from the 18th century to the present.
—M. Jaanus, M 12:00-1:50

 

Section 2: The Family in Fiction & Film: The Poetics of Growing Up
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors or Barnard senior Film majors. Priority given to Barnard Film majors and English majors with a Film concentration.
This course is designed to generate fresh takes on the family and on its multitude of representations, and to help each of you toward a thesis topic that is vital and has urgency for you. We will look closely at novels, memoirs and films that center on the child in the home, adult children and siblings, and at styles of parenting, from Salinger’s Glass family to Hirokazu Koreeda’s Yokoyama family. The operations of narrative, memory, imagination and play will interface with considerations of family psychodynamics (by way of readings in psychoanalysis) and the social history of this complex and polymorphous institution. Authors include Gaston Bachelard, Alison Bechdel, Jonathan Franzen. Vivian Gornick, Lorraine Hansberry, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, Arthur Miller, J.D. Salinger, Tennessee Williams, D.W. Winnicott, Richard Yates; films by Wes Anderson, Noah Baumbach, Ingmar Bergmann, Lance Hammer, Azazel Jacobs, Tamara Jenkins, Elia Kazan, Ang Lee, Andrei Zvyagintsev and others.
—M. Spiegel, T 4:10-6

 

Section 3: Sense and Disability
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
American narratives of disability at the turn of the twentieth century with special attention to gender, race, class, technology and law. Authors include L. Frank Baum, Helen Keller, Booker T. Washington, Henry James, Ernest Hemingway and Eudora Welty.
—J. Kassanoff, T 11-12:50

 

Section 4: Words and Pictures: The Intersection of Literary and Visual Art
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
In this class we will explore literary texts that focus on visual experience, especially painting and sculpture. What kinds of questions do these texts raise about the nature of aesthetic experience? How does what we mean by aesthetic experience change through time? Our readings will range from ancient to modern: Homer, Ovid, Catullus, Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Diderot, Balzac, Zola, Woolf, Sebald, among others. We will also read widely in the history of aesthetic philosophy and critical theory.
—R. Eisendrath, W 4:10-6


Section 5: Romance

Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
Romance is the most persistent and widespread kind of writing in the west, from high culture to low, from Shakespeare to the grocery store checkout line, yet it fits awkwardly into the critical modes we encounter in the university. This seminar explores the form from antiquity to recent film, including Ovid's Metamorphoses, medieval romance, Spenser's Faerie Queene, Shakespeare's Winter's Tale, Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, and the film Priscilla Queen of the Desert. One brief paper (two to three pages) per week in the first six weeks of term, followed by a substantial seminar paper on a text of each student's choosing.
—C. Baswell, M 4:10-6

 

Section 6: Gender, Sexuality and the American Stage: Performing the Body Politic
Prerequisites: Sign up is accomplished through the "SR Seminar" section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
This seminar investigates how American theatre/performance, as read through the lens of gender and sexuality, operates as a cultural force. Simply put, the U.S. is obsessed with sex; theatre/performance has proven a fertile medium for America’s expression of this obsession. Exploring texts from the seventeenth through the twenty-first centuries, we will consider how performance intersects with the nation state’s desire to regulate how we “practice” gender both publicly and behind closed doors. How is performance, which always includes gendered/raced/classed/sexualized bodies, situated in relationship to ideas of a national body politic? How does the American nation state hinge on how gender and sexuality are performed both on-stage and off? Authors include John Winthrop, Dion Boucicualt, Lillian Hellman, Tennessee Williams, David Henry Hwang, Michel Foucault, Jose Muñoz, Jill Dolan, Suzan-Lori Parks, Holly Hughes, Tony Kushner, Lisa Kron, Margaret Cho and performance groups Split Britches, Five Lesbian Brothers, Pomo Afro Homos.
—P. Cobrin, R 10:10-12

 

ENGL BC3999 Independent Study
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Department Chair. An Independent Study Form for BC 3999 must be filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall) in order to generate a call number. The form can be printed out from the department website http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms and is also available at the Department Office.
Senior majors who wish to substitute Independent Study for one of the two required senior seminars should consult the Department Chair. Permission is given rarely and only to students who present a clear and well-defined topic of study, who have a department sponsor, and who submit their proposals well in advance of the semester in which they will register. There is no independent study for screenwriting or film production.
4 points