2016 - 2017

Introductory

ENGL BC1201y First-Year Writing:Critical Conversations
Prerequisites: Required for all first-year students. Enrollment restricted to Barnard. May not be taken for P/D/F. Consult department website and bulletin board for section times. See course website http://firstyear.barnard.edu/rlh for more information.
(Formerly called “First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History.”) Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. Sections of the course are grouped in three clusters: I. Legacy of the Mediterranean; II. The Americas; III. Women and Culture. The first cluster features a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture. Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of canonicity, the last two clusters feature curricula that explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in culture.
3 points

 

ENGL BC1204x and y First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations (Workshop)

(Formerly called “First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History (Workshop).”) Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. Sections will focus on Legacy of the Mediterranean or Women and Culture and meet three times a week. For more information on the curriculum, please visit the Course Websitehttp://firstyear.barnard.edu/rlh.
4 points

 

FALL

Section 1         MWF 10:10-11:25      M. Kolisnyk
Section 2         TRF 1:10-2:25             V. Condillac

SPRING

Section 1         MWF 10:40-12:55      M. Kolisnyk
Section 2         TRF 10:10-11:25         W. Schor-Haim
Section 3         TRF 1:10-2:25             S. Fredman
Section 4         MWF 10:10-11:25      C. Lie

 

ENGL BC1210x First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations: Women and Culture
Enrollment restricted to Barnard. May not be taken for P/D/F. Consult the Online Schedule of Classes for section times. See course website http://firstyear.barnard.edu/rlh for more information.
Literary History often portrays women as peripheral characters, confining their power to the islands of classical witches and the attics of Romantic madwomen. This course offers a revisionist response to such constraints of canonicity, especially as they pertain to the marginalization of female subjectivity in literature and culture. The curriculum challenges traditional dichotomies—culture/nature, logos/pathos, mind/body—that cast gender as an essential attribute rather than a cultural construction. Fall term readings include Gilgamesh; Hymn to Demeter; Sophocles, Antigone; Ovid, Metamorphoses; Sei Shonagon, The Pillow Book; Marie de France, Lais; Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales; Kebra Negast; Shakespeare, As You Like It; Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, selected poetry; Aphra Behn, The Rover. Spring term readings include Milton, Paradise Lost; Leonora Sansay, Secret History; Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman; Lady Hyegyong, The Memoirs of Lady Hyegyong; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Emily Dickinson, selected poetry; Sigmund Freud, selected essays; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Gertrude Stein, Doctor Faustus Lights the Lights; Yvette Christiansë, Castaway.
3 points

ENGL BC1211x First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations: Legacy of the Mediterranean
Enrollment restricted to Barnard. May not be taken for P/D/F. Consult the Online Schedule of Classes for section times. See course website http://firstyear.barnard.edu/rlh for more information.
This course investigates key intellectual moments in the rich literary history that originated in classical Greece and Rome and continues to inspire some of the world’s greatest masterpieces. Close readings of works reveal how psychological and ideological paradigms, including the self and civilization, shift over time, while the historical trajectory of the course invites inquiry into the myth of progress at the heart of canonicity. Works studied in the fall term include Homer, Odyssey; The Homeric Hymn to Demeter; Euripides, The Bacchae; Virgil, Aeneid; Dante, Inferno; Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales; Margery Kempe, The Book of Margery Kempe; Shakespeare [selection depends on NYC theatre offerings]; Madame de Lafayette, The Princesse de Clèves; Cervantes, Don Quixote. Works studied in the spring term include Milton, Paradise Lost; Voltaire, Candide; Puccini, La Bohème [excursion to the Metropolitan Opera]; William Wordsworth (selected poetry); Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Darwin, Marx, and Freud (selected essays); Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; J. M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians.
3 points

ENGL BC1212x First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations: The Americas
Enrollment restricted to Barnard. May not be taken for P/D/F. Consult the Online Schedule of Classes for section times. See course website http://firstyear.barnard.edu/rlh for more information.
This course transcends traditional and arbitrary distinctions separating Caribbean, North, South, and Central American literatures. The Americas emerge not as colonial subjects but as active historical and aesthetic agents. Emanating from what might be called the geographical site of modernity, American literature is characterized by unprecedented diversity and innovation. In addition to classic novels, short stories, and poetry, this multicultural curriculum features works ranging in scope from creation accounts to autobiographies, as well as indigenous genres including captivity and slave narratives that belie New World declarations of independence. Works studied in the fall term include the Popul Vuh; William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, selected poetry; Phillis Wheatley, selected poetry; William Apess, A Son of the Forest; Esteban Echeverria, "El Matadero"; Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie; Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno. Spring term readings include Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson; Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; José Marti, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes, selected poetry; T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land; Pablo Neruda, The Heights of Macchu Picchu; Machado de Assis, Dom Casmurro; William Faulkner, "The Bear"; Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude.
3 points

Writing

ENGL BC3101x The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit.

Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring.
—P. Cobrin, TR 2:40-3:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3102x Academic Writing Intensive
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 8 students. Nomination and instructor's permission required.
Academic Writing Intensive is an intensive writing course for second-year Barnard students. Students will attend a weekly seminar and schedule an individual 30-minute conference with the instructor every other week. This focused, individual attention to a student's writing is designed to help the student strengthen her critical thinking, reading and writing skills.
4 points

Section 1 W 2:10-4 C. Lie
Section 2 R 10:10-12 C. Lie

 

 

ENGL BC3104x and y The Art of the Essay
Prerequisites: Can count towards major. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Students who are on the electronic waiting list or who are interested in the class but are not yet registered MUST attend the first day of class.
(Formerly called Essay Writing.) English composition above the first-year level. Techniques of argument and effective expression. Weekly papers. Individual conferences. Some sections have a special focus, as described.
3 points

 

FALL

Section 1 W 11-12:50 A. Schneider
Section 2 R 2:10-4 W. Schor-Haim

Section 3 T 2:10-4 P. Ellsberg


SPRING

Section 1 W 11-12:50 A. Schneider
Section 2 W 2:10-4 S. Fredman

Section 3 R 2:10-4 W. Schor-Haim

Section 4 T 2:10-4 Cecelia Lie (this section is open only to VISP students) 

 

Creative Writing
 

ENGL BC3105x (Section 1) Fiction and Personal Narrative
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

This class centers on the appreciation, analysis, and practice of short literary fiction, including personal narrative. In addition to weekly writing exercises, twice a semester each student will make available to the entire class longer pieces for "workshopping." These pieces will receive written evaluations from instructor and peers both. We will also read and study narrative by published authors -- historical and contemporary. In both student-generated and published work we will consider elements of prose narrative from structure to characterization, plot to voice, etc., in the hopes that such consideration will encourage student writers to expand their writerly repertoire and improve their work in terms of both craft and literary substance.
—T. Szell, W 4:10-6
3 points

 

ENGL BC3105x (Section 2) Fiction and Personal Narrative
Prerequisites: This section is only open to Barnard First-Year students. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing.

—M. Keane, R 12:10-2

3 points

 

ENGL BC3107x Introduction to Fiction Writing
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.
 —Anne Dewitt, T 2:10-4
3 points

 

ENGL BC3108y Introduction to Fiction Writing
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Practice in writing short stories with discussion and close analysis in workshop setting.
 —K. Walbert, M 11-12:50
3 points

 

ENGL BC3110x and y Introduction to Poetry Writing
Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques.
FALL: M. Field, W 2:10-4 

SPRING: J. Greenbaum, T 12-1:50

3 points

 

ENGL BC3113x Playwriting I
Prerequisites: Open only to Juniors and Seniors. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here:

http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
A workshop to provoke and investigate dramatic writing.
—L. Egloff, M 4:10-6
3 points

 

ENGL BC3114y Playwriting II
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
What makes a play alive? Often a playwright is surprised into their strongest work. The practices of experimentation and analysis, curiosity and audacity lead to new possibilities. Students will read and respond to plays, identifying elements and strategies, and each week bring in fragments and scenes written in response to weekly prompts. By the middle of the semester, students will choose the piece that feels the most viable and develop it into what in most cases will be a thirty page play.
—K. Tolan, R 4:10-6
3 points

 

ENGL BC3115x Story Writing I
Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.
—M. Keane, R 4:10-6

3 points

 

ENGL BC3116y Story Writing II
Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.
—M. Keane, W 2:10-4

3 points

 

ENGL BC3117x Fiction Writing
Previous experience or introductory class required. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
"I had given myself up to the idleness of a haunted man who looks for nothing but words wherein to capture his visions."—Joseph Conrad.  Given that reading is the one training tool writers cannot do without, this course aims to demonstrate how one might read as a writer. What sets this course apart is its focus, allotted equally, to creative writing and creative reading. Students will produce original prose fiction—which will be discussed in workshops—and engage in close reading of a wide selection of novels and short stories

—H. Matar, R 11-12:50
3 points

 

ENGL BC3118 Advanced Poetry Writing I
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
Weekly workshops designed to generate and critique new poetry. Each participant works toward the development of a cohesive collection of poems. Readings in traditional and contemporary poetry will also be included.

—S. Hamilton, W 11-12:50
3 points

 

ENGL BC3120x Creative Non-Fiction: Making Facts Sing
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
This course will challenge students to take on what are considered either difficult topics (e.g. in science and math) or "mundane" topics and create convincing and clear narratives therefrom. We will consider writing from John McPhee, Natalie Angier, Oliver Sacks, Nicholson Baker, and others. Through iterative writing exercises, research, and interviews, students will learn how to breathe life into complex material.
—A. Horowitz, T 10:10-12
3 points

 

ENGL BC3122y Creative Non-Fiction: The Gendered Memoir
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
A workshop in writing short autobiographical story with particular attention to the role gender plays in shaping experience. Focus on student writing, along with readings from the work of authors such as Augusten Buroughs; Alice Sebold; Alison Bechdel; Mary Karr, and others.  PLEASE NOTE: This course has been renumbered. It was previously ENGL BC3120, section 3 and has not changed in content.
—J. Boylan, M 6:10-8
3 points

 

ENGL BC3125y Advanced Poetry Writing II
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

A further study of poetic practice for committed student-writers with experience in writing and reading poems. In the classroom, student poems and ideas about poetics are shared, questioned, and critiqued. There will also be readings in and critical interpretation of traditional and contemporary poetry.
—C. Barnett, R 11-12:50
3 points

 

ENGL BC3126y Advanced Projects in Prose Writing

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Independent projects in imaginative writing in prose, including the genres of fiction, nonfiction, memoir, novellas, inter-related stories, and others. Class meetings consist of a few initial lectures on narrative followed by workshops focused on student writing in progress.

—J. Boylan, T 4:10-6

3 points

 

ENGL BC3132x Fiction Writing: Longer Forms

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
This course will explore longer fictional forms: linked stories, novels and novellas.

&mdashM. Gordon, T 6:10-8

3 points

 

ENGL BC3134y Creative Non-Fiction

Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

In this course, we'll learn some of the techniques involved in writing an entertaining, informative profile. Topics we will cover in reading and writing assignments will include the question of "objectivity" in profile-writing, how to convey complex controversies in lucid, lively prose, how to structure a long form article, strategies for interviewing difficult interview subjects, and what makes an enticing lede.
—Z. Heller, W 9-10:50
3 points

Speech
 

ENGL BC3121x and y Public Speaking
Prerequisites: Open only to undergraduates, preference to seniors and juniors. Enrollment limited to 14 students. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.
This course will introduce you to principles of effective public speaking and debate, and provide practical opportunities to use these principles in structured speaking situations. You will craft and deliver speeches, engage in debates and panel discussions, analyze historical and contemporary speakers, and reflect on your own speeches and those of your classmates. You will explore and practice different rhetorical strategies with an emphasis on information, persuasion and argumentation. For each speaking assignment, you will go through the speech-making process, from audience analysis, purpose and organization, to considerations of style and delivery. The key criteria in this course are content, organization, and adaptation to the audience and purpose. While this is primarily a performance course, you will be expected to participate extensively as a listener and critic, as well as a speaker.
—D. Kempf, TR 1:10-2:25
3 points

 

ENGL BC3123x Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit. Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.
Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program.
—P. Cobrin & D. Kempf, TR 10:10-11:25
3 points

Theatre

ENTH BC3144y Black Theatre

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Exploration of Black Theatre, specifically African-American performance traditions, as an intervening agent in racial, cultural, and national identity. African-American theatre artists to be examined include Amiri Baraka, Kia Corthron, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angelina Grimke, Langston Hughes, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrian Piper, and August Wilson. Fulfills one (of two) required courses in dramatic literature for Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts major.>

P. Cobrin, R 11-12:50

Language and Literature

ENGL BC3092x The English Conference: "Jews and Race in Early American Literature"

This course will explore the fascinating and rich literature by and about Jews in early America.  Although never the majority of the population, Jews were disproportionately important to colonial trade and were highly literate. The earliest Jewish American texts are accounts told by “crypto” (hidden) Jews while being tortured by Spanish colonial Inquisitors. These texts were quickly followed by literature written by Jews living openly in the Protestant colonies. Both forms bear the heavy influence of Spanish literature. In this course we look at four key themes from early Jewish American literature: the Inquisition, travel, slavery, and the body politic. Where exactly Jews fit into colonial hierarchies was a subject of debate. Early American censuses reveal Jews’ ever-changing status: sometimes Jews were white, sometimes they stood alone in a quasi-racial category between blacks and whites, and sometimes they were a religious group.  Through early literary texts, we will examine the shifting nature of race in early America and attempts by Jews and non-Jews to locate Jews in emergent hierarchies.

—L. Leibman, MW 4:10-6 on Sept 19, 21, 26, and 28
1 point

 

ENGL BC3093y The English Conference: “Modern Jewish Women's Writing In America”

This course considers prose and poetry written by twentieth- and twenty-first-century Jewish women in America. Paying equal attention to each of the terms in the course’s title—Modern, Jewish, Women, Writing, and America—we focus on works written in English as well as some in Yiddish. (NO knowledge of Yiddish is expected; all texts are in English.) Questions about religion, immigration, assimilation and acculturation, the Holocaust, and Israel are often raised in this literature, but so are explorations of class, sexuality, family relations, and political, social, and economic shifts in America. We will consider what writers had to say and how they wrote about such problematic but popular images as the Jewish mother, the “Jewish American Princess,” the radical Jew, and both traditional and modern Jewish women..

—Visiting Scholar Anita Norich (University of Michigan), M 4:10-6 on Feb 6, 13, 20, 27

1 point

 

ENGL BC3129x Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890 Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.
Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered.
—Q. Prettyman, TR 1:10-2:25
3 points

 

ENGL BC3130y The American Cowboy and the Iconography of the West

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25 students.
We will consider the image and role of the cowboy in fiction, social history, film, music, and art. Readings will include Cormac McCarthy's "The Border Trilogy.
—P. Ellsberg, MW 1:10-2:25
3 points

 

ENGL BC3135x Laughing: Wit and Humor in the Renaissance
An examination of the varieties of wit and humor in the European Renaissance, with an emphasis on England. How was wit imagined? What were its benefits? How did laughter affect the body? Why is sex funny?  How does wit relate to cruelty? Authors include Arentino, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Louise Labé, Thomas More, Philip Sidney, John Harrington (inventor of the water closet), John Donne, Aphra Behn, and some joke collections.

—A. Prescott, MW 1:10-2:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3141x Major English Texts I

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25 students.
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works.  Fall: Beowulf through Johnson.

—P. Ellsberg, MW 2:40-3:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3142y Major Texts II

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25 students.
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Spring: Romantic poets through the present.

—P. Ellsberg, MW 2:40-3:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3146y Walk This Way

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 45 students.

What's in a walk?  This course undertakes an interdisciplinary study of a fundamental human activity, focusing on philosophical and aesthetic treatments of human locomotion.  After first examining the history of walking as a social, economic, religious, and political activity, the course will concentrate on urban walking and how it has been represented in text and image from ancient times to the present.  Topics will include walking as introspection, escape, recreation, and discovery; walking and gender; the psychogeography of walking, walking in the city, etc.  Readings from Austen, Wordsworth, Dickens, Thoreau, Whitman, Joyce, Woolf, O'Hara, De Certeau, and many others.  Images from film, painting, and photography to be provided by student research.  Ditto for musical strolls.

—W. Sharpe, TR 11:40-12:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3147y Introduction to Narrative Medicine

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Narrative Medicine was designed to give doctors and healthcare professionals a more profound understanding of, and empathy for, the experience of illness. It teaches how to listen and what to listen for. While the skills developed are directly applicable to the practice of medicine, they are also important in any field in which human relationships are central: business, law, architecture, social work, and the creative arts. The multidisciplinary course entails a rigorous integration of didactic and experiential methodology to develop a heightened awareness of self and others and build a practical set of narrative competencies.

—R. Jones and C. Friedman, T 12-1:50

3 points

 

ENGL BC3154x Chaucer Before Canterbury

Chaucer's innovations with major medieval forms: lyric, the extraordinary dream visions, and the culmination of medieval romance, Troilus and Criseyde.  Approaches through close analysis, and feminist and historicist interpretation.  Background readings in medieval life and culture.

—Chris Baswell, TR 10:10-11:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3159-3160 - THE ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM PREFACE:
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Required of all English majors in their junior year. 

All sections of 3159 (fall semester) are on the Renaissance; all sections of 3160 (spring semester) are on the Enlightenment.
4 points

ENGL BC3159x:
In the Renaissance colloquium we will examine English and European imaginative and intellectual life from the sixteenth to mid-seventeenth centuries. Defined by humanism, the Protestant Reformation, and revolution, this was a period of ideological struggle on many levels. Long-held ways of ordering the world came under increasing strain—and sometimes ruptured irreparably. Writers discussed and debated the aims of human knowledge, retooled old literary forms for new purposes, scrambled to take account of an expanded awareness of the globe, and probed the tension between belief and doubt. Throughout this process, they experimented with new literary styles to express their rapidly changing worldviews. This is an intensive course in which we will take multiple approaches to a variety of authors that may include Petrarch, Erasmus, Machiavelli, Castiglione, More, Rabelais, Luther, Calvin, Montaigne, Spenser, Bacon, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Milton, and Behn, among others.

 

Section 1         T 4:10-6          R. Eisendrath
Section 2         M 2:10-4         M. Jaanus

Section 3         W 12-1:50       P. Platt

Section 1         R 11-12:50      A. Guibbory

 

ENGL BC3160y:
In the Enlightenment colloquium we will look at English and European imaginative and intellectual life during the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. During this period, writers tried in new ways to reconcile the tensions between reason and religion. Categories of thought that underlie our world today were taking shape: secularity, progress, the public and the private, individual rights, religious tolerance. Writers articulated principles of equality in an era of slavery. Literary forms like the novel, which emerges into prominence during this period, express in irreducibly complex ways these and other changes. In this intensive course, we will study from multiple angles a variety of authors that may include Hobbes, Dryden, Locke, Spinoza, Lafayette, Defoe, Swift, Pope, Richardson, Voltaire, Fielding, Johnson, Diderot, Sterne, and Wollstonecraft, among others.

 

Section 1         R 2:10-4          A. Schneider
Section 2         M 2:10-4         M. Jaanus

Section 3         M 10:10-12     J. Basker

Section 4         W 12-1:50       A. Guibbory

 

ENGL BC3163y Shakespeare I
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students.
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances. Please note that you do not need to take ENGL BC3163: Shakespeare I and ENGL BC3164: Shakespeare II in sequence; you may take them in any order.

—R. Eisendrath, TR 4:10-5:25
3 points

 

ENGL BC3164x Shakespeare II
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students.
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.
—P. Platt, MW 8:40-9:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3167x Milton

Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes and selections of Milton's earlier poetry and prose (defenses of free press, divorce, individual conscience, political and religious liberty) read within the context of religious, political, and cultural history, but with a sense of connection to present issues.

—A. Guibbory, TR 2:40-3:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3173x The Eighteenth-Century Novel
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 100 students.
The development of the novel form in Great Britain.  Topics will include: epistolary fiction, the novel of sentiment, Gothicism; the novel's roots in romance, satire, and the picaresque; modern theories of the origins and development of the novel. Works by: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, Austen, and others.
—R. Hamilton, TR 1:10-2:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3176x The Romantic Era

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 100 students.

Romantic writers in their intellectual, historical, and political context, with reference to contemporary movements in philosophy, music, and the plastic arts. Authors include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats. An emphasis on close reading of the poetry.

—R. Hamilton, TR 11:40-12:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3177y Victorian Literature: The Novel

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 50 students.

This course explores important works from one of the most vibrant periods in the history of the novel. Beginning with Jane Austen, the most significant transitional figure from the preceding period, other authors may include Gaskell, Dickens, C. Brontë, Eliot, Hardy, and James. While attending to form and style, we will focus on the relation of these fictional worlds to the social realities of the time, and on how the novels reflect and challenge Victorian ideas about self and society, education, ambition and social class, femininity and desire, labor and domesticity.

—M. Cregan, MW 2:40-3:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3179x American Literature to 1800 

Early American histories, autobiographies, poems, plays, and novels tell stories of pilgrimage and colonization; private piety and public life; the growth of national identity; Puritanism, Quakerism, and Deism; courtship and marriage; slavery and abolition. Writers include Bradford, Shepard, Bradstreet, Taylor, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Franklin, Woolman, and Brown.

—L. Gordis, TR 11:40-12:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3180y American Literature 1800-1870
Beginning with literature from the late Republican period, this course considers how nascent efforts to forge a national identity culminate in Civil War. Writers include Brown, Irving, Emerson, Poe, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.
—M. Vandenburg, TR 4:10-5:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3181x American Literature 1871-1945

American literature in the context of cultural and historical change. Writers include Whitman, Melville, Twain, James, Hopkins, Wharton, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Hurston.
—J. Kassanoff, TR 10:10-11:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3185 Modern British and American Poetry

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 30 students.

Poetry written in English during the past century, discussed in the context of modernism, postmodernism, literary theory, and changing social and technological developments.  Students will participate in shaping the syllabus and leading class discussion.  Authors may include Yeats, Williams, Eliot, Moore, Bishop, Rich, Ginsberg, Stevens, O' Hara, Plath, Brooks, Jordan, Walcott, Alexie, and many others.
—W. Sharpe, TR 10:10-11:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3188y The Modern Novel
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 50 students.

Examines formal changes in the novel from nineteenth-century realism to stream of consciousness, montage, and other modernist innovations. Social and historical contexts include World War I, urbanization, sexuality and the family, empire and colonialism. Works of Henry James, E. M. Forster, Ford Madox Ford, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce.
—R. Abramowitz, MW 11:40-12:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3189y Postmodernism

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 56 students.

This course considers how Postmodernism's profound distrust of language and narrative transforms the form and function of literature. Writers include Barthelme, Pynchon, Didion, Morrison, Robinson, Banville, Coetzee, Ishiguro, Hass, and Hejinian.
—M. Vandenburg TR 2:40-3:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3192x Exile and Estrangement in Global Literature
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 22 students.
"I would never be part of anything. I would never really belong anywhere, and I knew it, and all my life would be the same, trying to belong, and failing. Always something would go wrong. I am a stranger and I always will be, and after all I didn’t really care."—Jean Rhys.

This course examines the experiential life of the novelist as both artist and citizen. Through the study of the work of two towering figures in 20th century literature, we will look at the seemingly contradictory condition of the novelist as both outsider and integral to society, as both observer and expresser of time’s yearnings and passions. In different ways and with different repercussions, Jean Rhys and Albert Camus were born into realities shaped by colonialism. They lived across borders, identities and allegiances. Rhys was neither black-Caribbean nor white-English. Albert Camus could be said to have been both French and Algerian, both the occupier and the occupied, and, perhaps, neither. We will look at how their work reflects the contradictions into which they were born. We will trace, through close reading and open discussion, the ways in which their art continues to have lasting power and remain, in light of the complexities of our own time, vivid, true and alive. The objective is to pinpoint connections between novelistic form and historical time. The uniqueness of the texts we will read lies not just in their use of narrative, ideas and myths, but also in their resistance to generalization. We will examine how our novelists’ existential position, as both witnesses and participants, creates an opportunity for fiction to reveal more than the author intends and, on the other hand, more than power desires.
—H. Matar, R 4:10-6

4 points

 

ENGL BC3193 Critical Writing
Prerequisites: Open only to Barnard students. Enrollment in each section limited to 10 students.
Provides experience in the reading and analysis of literary texts and some knowledge of conspicuous works of literary criticism. Frequent short papers. Required of all majors before the end of the junior year. Sophomores are encouraged to take it in the spring term even before officially declaring their major. Transfer students should plan to take BC3193 in the autumn term.
4 points
 

FALL

Section 1         W 10:10-12     W. Sharpe
Section 2         M 4:10-6         M. Cregan

Section 3         M 2:10-4         M. Spiegel

Section 4         T 4:10-6          T Szell

Section 5      W 11-12:50     M. Vandenburg


SPRING

Section 1         W 4:10-6         R. Eisendrath
Section 2         R 4:10-6          A. Lynn>

Section 3         M 12-1:50       S. Pedatella

Section 4         W 11-12:50    J. Pagano

 

ENGL BC3195x Modernism

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 56 students.  
Psychoanalysis, world war, and shifting gender paradigms inspire fragmented narratives, stream-of-consciousness prose, and improbable blends of erudition and the avant-garde. Stylistic innovation notwithstanding, Modernism authorizes a remarkably traditional literary canon. Special attention will be devoted to how seminal manifestos, most notably “Tradition and the Individual Talent” and A Room of One’s Own, frame the movement’s embattled aesthetics. Works by Eliot, Woolf, Barnes, Faulkner, Hemingway, Joyce, Lawrence, Pound, Stein, Toomer, and Yeats.
—M. Vandenburg, TR 2:40-3:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3252x Contemporary Media Theory
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.
Explores the transformation of sociality, consciousness and geo-politics by and as media technologies during the long 20th century. Students will read influential works of media analysis written during the past century, analyze audio-visual analog and digital media, and explore political theory and media theory written since the rise of the internet. Final projects on contemporary media forms.
—J. Beller, W 11-12:50
4 points

 

ENRE BC3810y Literary Approaches to the Bible

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.

Interpretive strategies for reading the Bible as a work with literary dimensions. Considerations of poetic and rhetorical structures, narrative techniques, and feminist exegesis will be included. Topics for investigation include the influence of the Bible on literature.
—P. Ellsberg, T 2:10-4

4 points

 

ENGL BC3996 Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Department Chair required. In rare cases, with the permission of the Chair, a special project in conjunction with a course may be taken English majors who are not concentrating in Theatre or Writing. An Independent Study Form for BC3996 must be filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall) in order to generate a call number. The form can be printed out from the department website http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms and is also available at the Department Office.
Senior majors who are concentrating in Theatre or Writing and have completed two courses in writing or three in theatre will normally take the Special Project in Theatre or Writing in combination with an additional course in their special field. This counts in place of one of the Senior Seminars. In certain cases, Independent Study may be substituted for the Special Project.

 

ENGL BC3901x The Field of the Emotions in Romantic Literature and the Arts, Psychoanalysis, Affective Neuroscience, and Philosophy

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 

An interdisciplinary examination of human feelings, emotions, and passions, with a focus on the romantic era (the poetry of Keats & Shelley, Beethoven's 9th symphony, Turner's paintings), in coordination with more scientific approaches to these phenomena in affective neuroscience (Jaak Panksepp), psychoanalysis (selected Lacan, references to Freud) and philosophy (excerpts and references to Aristotle, Hume, Hegel, & Schiller). A feeling, an emotion, an affect is something that comes into existence or happens or that shows itself (Greek Phainein=to show) without our knowing exactly what it is, what caused it, or what it is "showing" or "saying." How have these phenomena and their function been interpreted? What do we at this point know, how does this compare to earlier speculations, and what should or can we try to do with our emotions and passions?
—M. Jaanus, T 2:10-4

 

ENGL BC3902x Adultery: Realism and Desire in Fiction and Film
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior film majors and Barnard senior English majors with a film concentration.

“Rising from the most basic human needs, marriage is essential to our most profound hopes and aspirations.” So writes the United States Supreme Court in Obergefell v. Hodges (2015), finding in marriage the "keystone of our social order" - the means by which individual desire is stably fixed within the family unit and, thereby, linked to civility and law. This course studies a rich counter-tradition of film and literature interested in adultery. These works suggest ways in which human desire and identity exceed social bounds; they also examine ways in which private desire is not only limited but formed by social forces. Works may include: fiction by Flaubert, Goethe, James, Laclos, Proust, Tolstoy; films by Frears, Kieslowski, Renoir, Resnais, Wilder, Wong; criticism and philosophy by Barthes, Beauvoir, Cavell, Cott, Freud, Hegel, Marx.—A. Lynn, R 4:10-6
 

ENGL BC3903x Poets in Correspondence

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) How do poets' letters inform our understanding of their poetry?  From the eighteenth to the twentieth century, poets have used their intimate correspondence to "baffle absence," as Coleridge remarked.  This course will examine the ways several masters of the letter (including Cowper, Keats, Dickinson, Eliot, Bishop, and Lowell, among others) shaped their prose to convey spontaneity in paradoxically artful ways, illuminating their major work as poets and making the private letter a literary form in its own right.

—S. Hamilton, T 10:10-12

 

ENGL BC3904x Dickens
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) Charles Dickens: the life, the works, the legend, in as much detail as we can manage in one semester. Reading will include Pickwick Papers, A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield, Bleak House, and selections from his friend John Forster's Life of Charles Dickens, as well as other works to be chosen by the class. Special emphasis will be given to Dickens's literary style and genius for characterization, in the context of Victorian concerns about money, class, gender, and the role of art in an industrializing society. Students will be expected to share in creating the syllabus, presenting new material, and leading class discussion. Be prepared to do a LOT of reading—all of it great!—plus weekly writing on CourseWorks.
—W. Sharpe, T 4:10-6


 

ENGL BC3905x Amazing Grace: English and American Antislavery Literature

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors
  Drawing on poems, plays, slave narratives, fiction and other genres, by both famous and non-canonical writers from 1660 to 1865, this seminar explores the ways that writers helped end slavery. Authors include Defoe, Johnson, Wheatley, Equiano, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Longfellow, Alcott, Stowe, Douglass, Melville, and Harriet Jacobs, among others. Final projects may take the form of extended critical essays or original anthologies.
—J. Basker, M 11-12:50

 

ENGL BC3906x Black Literature Now

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) Examines contemporary African American literature, in particular the ways in which recent authors are reconceiving literary notions of blackness. Beginning in the 1980s with the emergence of "post-soul" literature, this class explores the ways in which authors one or two generations after the Civil Rights Movement reconfigure their sense of racial "belonging" and notions of how to write "blackness" into a text. Authors may include Ellis, Pinckney, Whitehead, Everett, Senna, Beatty, Evans, Ward, Lavalle.

—M. Miller, M 10:10-12

 

ENGL BC3907x Short Fiction by American Women

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 

We will explore the rich variety of fiction in shorter forms--short stories and novellas--written by American women. Writers to be studied will include Porter, Stafford, Welty, O'Connor, Olsen, Paley.

—M. Gordon, W 6:10-8

 

ENGL BC3908y The American Sublime

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 

(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) "The empty spirit / In vacant space": gothicism, transcendentalism, and postmodern rapture. Traces of the sublime in the American literary landscape, featuring Poe, Melville, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Stevens, Bishop, Didion, and Robinson.
—M. Vandenburg, W 11-12:50

 

ENGL BC3909y The Family in Fiction & Film: The Poetics of Growing Up
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior film majors and Barnard senior English majors with a film concentration.

(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) Looking closely at late Twentieth and Twenty-First Century stories, novels, memoir and films that center on the logic, dysfunction, romance, system, morphing, divorcing and curious maturation of the family. From Alison Bechdel's graphic novel, Fun Home, to the Korean film, The Host, we will explore fresh and a few classic cinematic takes on this theme. We will explore renderings of "family cultures," family feeling, family values, the family as a narrative configuration, and home as a utopian space, a nightmarish landscape, a memory palace and more. Authors and directors will include: Wes Anderson, Gaston Bachelard, Mira Bartok, Alison Bechdel, Joon-ho Bong, Jonathan Franzen, Vivien Gornick, Lasse Hallstrom, Tamara Jenkins, Ang Lee, Mike Leigh, Jim, Sheridan, Todd Solondz, Francois Truffaut, Tennessee Williams, D. W. Winnicott, Andrei Zvyagintsev.

—M. Spiegel, M 2:10-4
 

ENGL BC3910y Sexuality, Sin, and Spirituality

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) The first half of the course is grounded in readings from the Bible, Augustine, Petrarch and Donne, but the second half will move to later texts including Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, and Flannery O'Connor stories. We will discuss as a class other texts we might want to add. For their senior essays, students will come up with their own topics and may explore the relation and intersection between sexuality, sin, and spirituality up into the present, and cross-culturally.

—A. Guibbory, T 12-1:50

 

ENGL BC3912y Utopias and Dystopias

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) A look first at Thomas More’s Utopia and then at the dreams or nightmares it inspired, whether hopeful, ironic, serious, parodic, speculative, nightmarish, or simply interrogatory. Authors include More, Rabelais, Bacon, Margaret Cavendish, William Morris, Bellamy, H.G. Wells, George Orwell, Ursula LeGuin and, if there is time, R.A. Lafferty’s scifi novel starring More and also a young adult novel by Lois Lowry.
—A. Prescott, T 2:10-4
 

ENGL BC3913y Human and Other Animal Identities

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) In this seminar, we will engage in an interdisciplinary study of intersections of human and non-human animal identities in selected literary, philosophical and theoretical texts. We will examine how constructions and representations of non-human animal identities confirm understandings and experiences of human ones, including racialized and gendered identities and study the ways in which non-human identities challenge claims to human exceptionalism. Some of the topics along which the readings will be arranged include liminality, (mis)-recognition, metamorphoses, suffering, as well as love. Readings include Aristotle, Euripides, Ovid, Montaigne, Descartes, Shakespeare, Kafka, Woolf, Morrison, Coetzee, Szymborska, Hughes, Haraway, and Derrida and essays by contemporary scholars such as Kim Hall and Karl Steel. Some class time will be devoted to the process of writing the thesis at all significant critical junctures.

—T. Szell, W 4:10-6