2007 - 2008

Introductory

ENGL BC 1201x,y. First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History
[For more information see course web site or library research guide]
Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. Sections of the course are grouped in three clusters: I. Legacy of the Mediterranean; II. The Americas; III. Women and Culture. The first cluster features a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture, as well as excursions to the opera, the theatre, and museums. Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of canonicity, the last two clusters feature curricula that explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in culture.   Required for all first-year students.  May not be taken for P/D/F.  Consult department bulletin board for section times.   3 points

Fall, 2007

Section 1         MW 9:10-10:25am
Section 2         MW 10:35-11:50am
Section 3         MW 11-12:15pm
Section 4         MW 1:10-2:25pm
Section 5         MW 1:10-2:25pm
Section 6         MW 2:40-3:55pm
Section 7         MW 2:40-3:55pm
Section 8         MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 9         MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 10       MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 11       TuTh 9:10-10:25am
Section 12       TuTh 9:10-10:25am
Section 13       TuTh 11-12:15pm
Section 14       TuTh 1:10-2:25pm
Section 15       TuTh 1:10-2:25pm
Section 16       TuTh 2:40-3:55pm
Section 17       TuTh 2:40-3:55pm
Section 18       TuTh 4:10-5:25pm

Spring, 2008

Section 1         TTh 9:10-10:25
Section 2         MW 9:10-10:25
Section 3         MW 11-12:15pm
Section 4         MW 1:10-2:25pm
Section 5         MW 1:10-2:25pm
Section 6         MW 2:40-3:55pm
Section 7         MW 2:40-3:55pm
Section 8         MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 9         MW 4:10-5:25pm
Section 10       TuTh 9:10-10:25pm
Section 11       TuTh 10:35-11:50am
Section 12       TuTh 1:10-2:25am
Section 13       TuTh 1:10-2:25pm
Section 14       TuTh 1:10-2:25pm
Section 15       TuTh 2:40-3:55pm
Section 16       TuTh 2:40-3:55pm
Section 17       TuTh 4:10-5:25pm
Section 18       TuTh 4:10-5:25pm
Section 19       TuTh 11:00-12:15

ENGL BC 1202x Studies in Writing
Intensive practice in writing, emphasizing drafts, revision, peer response, and individual conferences. Consideration of the conventions of English style, usage, and grammar by means of both informal and formal writing, culminating in expository essays. Recommended for, but not limited to, first-year students and students whose first language is not English. 3 points

Section 1          MW 9:10-10:25am      M. Kolisnyk
Section 2          TuTh 1:10-2:25pm       P. Cobrin
Section 3          MW 4:10-5:25pm        TBA

Writing

Registration in each course is limited and permission of the instructor required. A student is not permitted to take two writing courses concurrently.

ENGL BC 3101x The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing
Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring. Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit.— P. Cobrin. 3 points. TuTh 11-12:15pm

ENGL BC 3103x Essay Writing
English composition above the first-year level. Techniques of argument and effective expression. Weekly papers. Individual conferences. Some sections have a special focus, as described. Can count towards major.  3 points

Section 1        Tu 4:10-6pm        P. Kain
Section 2        Th 11-12:50pm     A. Schneider -- Cancelled
Section 3        M 2:10-4pm          J. Runsdorf

ENGL BC 3104y Essay Writing
English composition above the first-year level. Techniques of argument and effective expression. Weekly papers. Individual conferences. Some sections have a special focus, as described. Can count towards major.  3 points

Section 1          Tu 2:10-4 pm               M. Ellsberg
Section 2          W 2:10-4 pm               S. Fredman

Creative Writing

Registration in each course is limited and the permission of the instructor is required; for courses 3105­3118 and 3120, submit a writing sample in advance.   Departmental application forms are available in the department office, Room 417 Barnard. The signed forms and writing samples must be filed with the Director of Creative Writing, Professor Timea Szell (423 Barnard) before the end of the program planning period.

Since screenwriting is considered part of the Film Concentration, you may apply to screenwriting in addition to either a poetry or prose course.  However, you are strongly advised to take only one writing class in any given semester.   Two non-film creative writing courses may not be taken concurrently.

ENGL BC 3105x Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing.—R. Panek. 3 points. M 9:00-10:50am

ENGL BC 3106y Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing.—E. Benedict. 3 points. M 4:10-6 pm.

ENGL BC 3107x Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.—T. Szell. 3 points. W 4:10-6:00pm.

ENGL BC 3108y Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.—M. Goldberg. 3 points. M 6:10-8 pm.

ENGL BC 3110x Introduction to Poetry Writing
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques.
—C. Barnett. 3 points. Th 2:10-4:00pm.

ENGL BC 3110y Introduction to Poetry Writing
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques.
—S. Hamilton. 3 points.  W 2:10-4 pm.

ENGL BC 3113x Introduction to Playwriting
A workshop to provoke and investigate dramatic writing.—E. McLaughlin. 3 points. M 4:10–6pm

ENGL BC 3114y Advanced Playwriting
Advanced workshop to facilitate the crafting of a dramatic play with a bent towards the full length form.—J. Jordan.   3 points. Th 11-12:50 pm.

ENGL BC 3115x Story Writing
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.
Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged.—K. Hill.   3 points. Tu 4:10-6pm.

ENGL BC 3116y Story Writing II
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.
Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged.—M. Gordon. 3 points. M 6:10-8 pm.

ENGL BC 3117x Fiction Writing
Assignments designed to examine form and structure in fiction.—M. Swann. 3 points. W 4:10-6pm.  Prerequisites: Students will have already written a substantial body of work.

ENGL BC 3118y Advanced Poetry Writing
Weekly workshops designed to critique new poetry. Each participant works toward the development of a cohesive collection of poems. Short essays on traditional and contemporary poetry will also be required.—S. Hamilton. 3 points. W 4:10-6 pm.

ENGL BC 3120y Creative Non-fiction: Journalism
This course will explore the forms used by contemporary journalists, including memoir, profile, review, travel essay, arts criticism, etc. —P. Devlin. 3 points. T 11-12:50 pm.

Speech

Registration in each course is limited.  Students need to sign up outside the English Department office, room 417 Barnard Hall.

ENGL BC 3121x Uses of Speech
An introduction to effective oral presentation, including interviewing and public speaking.  Emphasis on self-presentation, research, organization, and audience analysis.—P. Denison.  3 points.  TuTh 10:35-11:50am.  Enrollment limited to 14 students.

Theatre

No Theatre courses are offered in the 2007-2008 academic year.  For information about studio courses in theatre, go to the Theatre office, 5th floor Milbank.

Language and Literature

ENGL BC 3140x, y Seminars on Special Themes:

Fall

Section 2: Enchanted Imagination
Romantic and post-Romantic fantasy that examines the transformative role of imagination in aesthetic and creative experience. Challenges accepted boundaries between the imagined and the real, and celebrates otherness and magicality in a disenchanted world. Authors include Blake, Coleridge, Keats, Mary Shelley, Tennyson, Carroll, Tolkien, LeGuin, Garcia Marquez.—J. Pagano.   3 points.  MW 10:35-11:50am>

Spring

Section 1: Biblical Heroes
In this seminar, we will consider certain important figures in the bible as literary characters and mythical heroes. Included among the figures we will study will be Noah, Abraham, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, Miriam, Rahab, Deborah, Yael, Ruth, Samuel, Saul, David, Job, Jonah, Mary, Jesus, Peter, and Paul. Not open to those who have taken ENRE BC3810 (Literary Approaches to the Bible).  Enrollment limited to 14.—M. Ellsberg.   3 points.  MW 1:10-2:25 pm.

Section 2: Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Literature
1760-1890

Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered. —Q. Prettyman. 3 points. T Th 2:40-3:55 pm.

ENTH BC 3140y: Women and Theatre
An exploration of the impact of women in theatre history—with special emphasis on American theatre history—including how dramatic texts and theatre practice have reflected the ever-changing roles of women in society. Playwrights include Glaspell, Crothers, Grimke, Hellman, Finley, Hughes, Deavere Smith, and Vogel. Enrollment limited to 18 students. —P. Cobrin. 4 Points. Tu 11-12:50 pm.

ENGL BC 3141x Major English Texts
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Autumn: Beowulf through Johnson. Guest lectures by members of the department.—M. Ellsberg. 3 points. MW 11:00-12:15pm

ENGL BC 3142y Major English Texts II
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Spring: Romantic poets through the present. Guest lectures by members of the department. —M. Ellsberg. 3 points. MW 11:00-12:15pm.

ENGL BC 3155y Canterbury Tales
Chaucer as inheritor of late-antique and medieval conventions and founder of early modern literature. Selections from related medieval texts. Formalist, historicist, and feminist approaches. —T. Szell. 3 points. TTh 2:40-3:55 pm.

ENGL BC 3159x and 3160y The English Colloquium:
Required of majors in the junior year.  Students may substitute 3 courses--from ENGL BC3154-BC3158, BC3163-BC3164, BC3165-BC3169, or ENTH BC3136-BC3137.  This year BC3140y sec. 2 will also count as a substitution. Students may also take 1 colloquium and 2 substitutions.  At least one of these courses must cover Medieval or Renaissance material; at least one material of the 17th or 18th Century. One of these will also count toward satisfying the "before 1900" requirement.  4 points.

Fall (3159x):

Section 1: Imitation & Creation
New ideas of the mind's relation to the world. New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style.—R. Hamilton. M 4:10p - 6:00pm

Section 2: Skepticism and Affirmation
The development of modern concepts of subjectivity and authority. The rise of art and the artist. Myth versus science.  Knowledge versus experience. Humanism, Rationalism, Empiricism. The tension between belief and doubt.  The exploration of limits and the limitless.  Definition of the beautiful and the sublime.—M. Jaanus. T 2:10p-4:00pm

Section 3: Reason and Imagination
Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience.—C. Plotkin. W 4:10-6pm

Section 4: Order and Disorder
The tension, conflicts, and upheavals of an era in the arts, religion, politics, aesthetics, and society.—A. Guibbory. Tu 11:00a - 12:50pm

Spring (3160y):

Section 1: Imitation & Creation
New ideas of the mind's relation to the world. New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style.—R. Hamilton. W 9-10:50 am.

Section 2: Skepticism and Affirmation
The development of modern concepts of subjectivity and authority.  The rise of art and the artist. Myth versus science.  Knowledge versus experience.   Humanism, Rationalism, Empiricism.  The tension between belief and doubt.   The exploration of limits and the limitless.  Definition of the beautiful and the sublime.—M. Jaanus.  T 2:10-4 pm.

Section 3: Reason and Imagination
Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience.—C. Plotkin. W 4:10-6.

Section 4: Order and Disorder
The tension, conflicts, and upheavals of an era in the arts, religion, politics, aesthetics, and society.—J. Basker. W 2:10-4 pm.

ENGL BC 3163x Shakespeare
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.—A. Prescott. 3 points. MW 11:0-12:15pm

ENGL BC 3164y Shakespeare II
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances. Limited to 50 students.— P. Denison. 3 points. TTh 10:35-11:50 am.

ENGL BC 3167y Milton
Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes and selections of Milton's earlier poetry and prose (defenses of free press, divorce, individual conscience, political and religious liberty) read within the context of religious, political, and cultural history, but with a sense of connection to present issues.—A. Guibbory. 3 points.  TTh 10:35-11:50 am.

ENGL BC 3169x Renaissance Drama: Kyd to Ford
Major plays of the English Renaissance (excluding Shakespeare), with emphasis on Marlowe and Middleton.—K. Hall. 3 points. TuTh 1:10-2:25pm.

ENGL BC 3171x The Novel and Psychoanalysis
The novel in its cultural context, with an emphasis on psychoanalysis.   Reading selected novels from Defoe to D.H. Lawrence.—M. Jaanus. 3 points. MW 2:40-3:55pm

ENGL BC 3173y 18th-Century Literature (1660-1820)
Tradition and innovation in several forms across the "long eighteenth-century " with emphasis on the origins and development of the novel.   Enrollment limited to 20 students. —R. Hamilton. 3 points. TTh 10:35-11:50 am.

ENGL BC 3176y The Romantic Era
Romantic writers in their intellectual, historical, and political context, with reference to contemporary movements in philosophy, music, and the plastic arts.  Authors include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats.  An emphasis on close reading of the poetry.—C. Plotkin. 3 points. TTh 1:10-2:25 pm.

ENGL BC 3178x Victorian Poetry and Criticism
Poetry, art, and aesthetics in an industrial society, with emphasis on the role of women as artists and objects.  Poems by Tennyson, Arnold, Christina and D.G, Rossetti, Swinburne, and Elizabeth and Robert Browning; criticism by Ruskin, Arnold, and Wilde; paintings by the Pre-Raphaelites and Whistler; photographs by J.M. Cameron.—C. Plotkin  3 points. T Th 1:10-2:25pm.

ENGL BC 3179x American Literature to 1800
Early American histories, autobiographies, poems, plays, and novels tell stories of pilgrimage and colonization; private piety and public life; the growth of national identity; Puritanism, Quakerism, and Deism; courtship and marriage; slavery and abolition.  Writers include Bradford, Shepard, Bradstreet, Taylor, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Franklin, Woolman, Brown.—L. Gordis.   3 points.  MW 11-12:15pm.

ENGL BC 3180y American Literature, 1800-1870
Texts from the late Republican period through the Civil War explore the literary implications of American independence, the representation of Native Americans, the nature of the self, slavery and abolition, gender and woman's sphere, and the Civil War. Writers include Irving, Emerson, Poe, Fuller, Thoreau, Douglass, Stowe, Jacobs, Whitman, Dickinson.—L. Gordis.  3 points. MW 11:00-12:15 pm.

ENGL BC 3181x American Literature, 1871-1945
American literature in the context of cultural and historical change. Writers include Twain, James, DuBois, Wharton, Cather, Wister, Faulkner, Hurston. —J. Kassanoff. 3 points.  TuTh 10:35-11:50am

ENGL BC 3183y American Literature since 1945
American fiction, literary and cultural criticism since 1945.  Topics include: the authorial and critical search for the great contemporary American novel, the particularity of "American" characters, genres, aesthetics, subjects, the effect of these debates on canon formation and the literary marketplace.   Authors may include: Bellow, Ellison, Nabokov, Capote, Kerouac, Didion, Pynchon, Morrison, Roth, Allison and Franzen.—M. Miller. 3 points. MW 10:35-11:50 am.

ENGL BC 3185x Modern British and American Poetry
The poetry of three decades, 1915-25, 1955-65, and 1991-2001.  Poems by Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Pound, HD, Williams, Auden, Millay, Larkin, Plath, Walcott, Hughes, Ponsot, Ignatow, and Yusef Komunyakaa.—K. Swenson.   3 points. MW 9:10a-10:25am.

ENGL BC 3188y The Modern Novel
The course examines formal changes in the novel from nineteenth-century realism to stream of consciousness, montage, and other modernist innovations.  Contexts include World War I, technology, urbanization, nostalgia, sexuality and the family, mass culture, psychoanalysis, empire and colonialism. Representative works from authors such as James, Forster, West, Ford, Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce, Kafka.  Enrollment limited to 50 students.—M. Cregan.  3 points. MW 10:35-11:50 am.

ENGL BC 3189y Postmodernism
This course examines literary forms emerging from the rubble of representation produced by the tyranny of progress (commodification, mass media, globalization) and the deconstruction of grand narratives.  Works by Auster, Barnes, Barthelme, Coetzee, Pynchon, Reed, Robinson, Rushdie, and Stoppard. —M. Vandenburg. 3 points.  TTh 2:40-3:55 pm.

ENGL BC 3191x,y The English Conference: The Lucyle Hook Guest Lectureship
Various topics presented by visiting scholars in courses that will meet for two to four weeks during each semester. Topics, instructors, and times will be announced by the department. Students must attend all classes to receive credit for this course.
To be taken only for P/D/F. Departmental registration required.  1 point.

Fall, 2007

Series of Lectures on Holocaust Literature: Forms of Autobiography
This series of lectures will focus on the representation of the Holocaust in forms of autobiography including Holocaust testimonies, children’s diaries, journals, and selected memoirs.  The course will include discussion of the following works:  oral histories from Brana Gurewitsch’s Mothers, Sisters, Resisters and from the ortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale University; selected unknown children’s diaries; journal entries from Etty Hillesum’s An Interrupted Life; and excerpts from two memoirs, Charlotte Delbo’s Auschwitz and After and Primo Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz.  Selected short stories and poems also will be distributed.  Attention will be paid to forms of witnessing and to artistic techniques used by different Holocaust writers to represent their experiences. There also will be several films shown including Night and Fog, the first Holocaust documentary, and excerpts from Shoah and The Last Days.—Dr. Jan Zlotnik Schmidt.   Thursdays, Nov. 1st, 8th, 15th, and 29th from 6:10-8pm.

Spring, 2008

Science as Literature:  How We See the Universe
We usually read scientific writings, if we read them at all, to find out what we know about the universe.  In this series of four lectures we will read excerpts from some of the most influential scientific writings in history to find out how we think about the universe.  By paying close attention to the literary qualities of the works, we will consider the roles that both the individual and society play in investigating nature, and how and why those roles have changed over the ages.  (Bonus:  The lectures will also provide a a compact survey of the history of Western science.)  Readings, which will be supplied, will include excerpts from Aristotle, Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Darwin, Freud, Einstein, Heisenberg, Bohr, Crick and Watson, and other one-name wonders.‘R. Panek To be taken only for P/D/F.  Departmental registration required. 1 point.  Four Tuesdays: Feb. 19 and 26, March 4 and 11, 6:10-8 pm.

ENGL BC 3193x: Literary Criticism and Theory
Provides experience in the reading and analysis of literary texts and some knowledge of conspicuous works of literary criticism.  Frequent short papers.   Required of all majors before the end of the junior year.  Sophomores are encouraged to take it in the spring term even before officially declaring their major.  Transfer students should plan to take BC3193 in the autumn term.   Registration in each section is limited.  Departmental registration required.  4 points

Fall:

Section 1     Th 4:10-6 pm     C. Brown
Section 2     Tu 12:10-2 pm   M. Cregan
Section 3     Tu 4:10-6pm      M. Spiegel
Section 4     M 2:10-4 pm      R. Hamilton
Section 5     W 11-12:50 pm   S. Sobelle

Spring:

Section 1     Tu 2:10-4 pm    T. Ratekin
Section 2     M 4:10-6 pm    S. Sobelle
Section 3     M 2:10-4 pm    J. Runsdorf
Section 4     Th 4:10-6 pm    C. Plotkin
Section 5     Tu 4:10-6 pm    M. Steinkoler

ENGL BC 3194x (Section 2) Critical & Theoretical Perspectives on Literature: Literary Theory
This course will examine nineteenth century foundational texts (Marx, Freud, Nietzsche), landmarks of the twentieth century (Gramsci, Foucault, Deleuze, Butler, Jameson, Spillers, Said, Spivak, Anzaldua, Debray, Kelly, Rafael), the novels of Jose Rizal, and selected critical essays.—J. Beller. 3 points.  Th 4:10-6pm.

ENGL BC 3195x Modernism
Modernist responses to cultural fragmentation and gender anxiety in the wake of psychoanalysis and world war. Works by Woolf, Joyce, Yeats, Eliot, Stein, Hemingway, Toomer, H.D., Pound, Lawrence, Barnes, and other Anglo-American writers. —M. Vandenburg. 3 points. TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p

ENGL BC 3196x Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
Explores the cultural contexts and aesthetic debates surrounding the Harlem or New Negro literary renaissance, 1920-30s. Through fiction, poetry, essays, and artwork, topics considered include: modernism, primitivism, patronage, passing and the problematics of creating a "racial" art in/for a community comprised of differences in gender, class, sexuality, and geographical origin. —M. Miller. 3 points.  MW 10:35-11:50am.

ENGL BC 3199x Poetics.
An investigation of poetry and imagination in practice and theory in the work of lyric poets from the fourteenth century to the present. Selected prose and poetry by Petrarch, Herbert, Cowper, Blake, Keats, Clare, Dickinson, Baudelaire, the Modernists, Celan, and others.—S. Hamilton. 3 points. TuTh 1:10- 2:25pm.

ENRE BC 3810x Literary Approaches to the Bible
Interpretive strategies for reading the Bible as a work with literary dimensions. Considerations of poetic and rhetorical structures, narrative techniques, and feminist exegesis will be included. Topics for investigation include the influence of the Bible on literature, combined with the more formal disciplines of biblical studies. —M. Ellsberg. Tu 2:10p - 4:00p

ENGL BC 3996x: Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation
Senior majors who are concentrating in Theatre or Writing and have completed two courses in writing or three in theatre will normally take the Special Project in Theatre or Writing ( BC3996x, y) in combination with an additional course in their special field.   This counts in place of one of the Senior Seminars.  In certain cases, Independent Study (BC3999) may be substituted for the Special Project.  Permission of instructor and chair required.  In rare cases, with the permission of chair, a special project in conjunction with a course may be taken by other English majors.  1 point.

ENGL BC 3996y: Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation
Senior majors who are concentrating in Theatre or Writing and have completed two courses in writing or three in theatre will normally take the Special Project in Theatre or Writing (BC3996x, y) in combination with an additional course in their special field. This counts in place of one of the Senior Seminars. In certain cases, Independent Study (BC3999) may be substituted for the Special Project.  Permission of instructor and chair required.  In rare cases, with the permission of chair, a special project in conjunction with a course may be taken by other English majors.  1 point.

ENGL BC 3997x and 3998y: Senior Seminars Studies in Literature
Required of all majors, these seminars are designed to deepen knowledge of periods, writers, works, genres, and theories through readings, discussion, oral reports, and at least one significant research paper. Written permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to seniors.   4 points.

Fall:

Section 1: The Concept of Happiness
An interdisciplinary examination of the idea of happiness from Aristotle to the present. Short readings in a variety of literary and other texts.—M. Jaanus. W 4:10-6pm

Section 2: Reading and Writing Women in Colonial America
In April 1645, John Winthrop lamented the sorry state of Ann Yale Hopkins, "who was fallne into a sadd infirmytye, the losse of her vnderstandinge & reason . . . by occasion of her giving her selfe wholly to readinge & writing, & had written many bookes." Consideration of poetry, autobiographies, captivity narratives, novels, and commonplace books by colonial women, including Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Phillis Wheatley, and Hannah Foster, as well as texts that reveal women's reading and publication practices, such as accounts of Anne Hutchinson and Milcah Martha Moore's Book. —L. Gordis. M 2:10-4pm

Section 3: The Enlightenment & the African Diaspora: Slavery in English Literature 1660-1820
The seminar focuses on primary texts in historical context, with attention to drama, poetry, prose fiction, and selected non-fiction. Authors include Behn, Southerne, Defoe, Pope, Johnson, Wheatley, Hammon, Equiano, Sancho, Boswell, Blake, More, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Gregoire, and others. — J. Basker. W 2:10–4pm

Section 4: Poets and their Correspondence
How do poets' letters inform our understanding of their poetry?  From the eighteenth to the twentieth century, poets have used their intimate correspondence to "baffle absence," as Coleridge remarked.   This course will examine the ways several masters of the letter (including Cowper, Keats, Dickinson, Eliot, Bishop, and Lowell, among others) shaped their prose to convey spontaneity in paradoxically artful ways, illuminating their major work as poets and making the private letter a literary form in its own right.—S. Hamilton. Tu 4:10-6pm

Section 5: Toni Morrison
Examines Toni Morrison's oeuvre and aesthetic in the context of the last 30 years of African American literary criticism and cultural studies. Literary critical movements to be discussed include: black feminist criticism, literary black nationalism, gender studies and queer theory, post-colonialism and the writing of the black diaspora, "racial" writing and the literature of witness, trauma, memory and forgetting.—M. Miller.  W 2:10-4pm

Section 6: Monsters, Machines, Cyborgs: toward a History of Technology
Artistic and literary responses to technological change that transformed the idea of what it means to be human, from Shakespeare's The Tempest to Shelley's Frankenstein, from La Mettrie's Man-Machine to Ridley Scott's Alien.—R. Hamilton. M 11-12:50pm

Spring:

Section 1: Nature and Eco-Criticism
The rise of ecological consciousness during the Industrial revolution. The shift from natural philosophy to a philosophy of nature. Topics include Deism, the terror of the sublime, the Darwinian survival of the fittest, and the rhetoric of global warming. —R. Hamilton. W 2:10-4 pm.

Section 2: Film: The Man in the Crowd/The Woman of the Streets
Explores theories of the crowd, mass behavior and the individual in American fiction and film, from idealizations of democracy to lynch mobs. Works by Poe, Melville, Hawthorne, Crane, Lewis, West, Baldwin, Le Bon, Benjamin, Canetti, films by Vidor, Chaplin, Capra, Lang, Kazan and others. —M. Spiegel. Th 4:10-6 pm.

Section 3: The Family in Turn-of-the-Century American Fiction
An inter-disciplinary examination of changing cultural dynamics of the American family. Considers issues such as the market, immigration, "race," reproductive politics, and nativism.  Authors include James, Wharton, Cahan, Hopkins, Gilman, Cather, and Faulkner.—J. Kassanoff. Tu 2:10–4 pm.

Section 4: Courtship in the Works of Chaucer
Erotic and courtly love, discourses of desire, gendered power, and some connections between poetry and courtship in Chaucer's dream vision, Parliament of Fowles, selections from The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde.  Further readings include the biblical Song of Solomon, Ovid, medieval Arab love poetry, troubadour lyrics, Dante, The Romance of the Rose, and Gottfried von Strassburg's Tristan.—T. Szell.  W 11-12:50 pm.

Section 5: Masterpieces
An inquiry into the historical and theoretical relationship between grand narratives and masterpieces, this course weighs the political dangers of obeying the laws of canonicity against the aesthetic risk of defiance. Works by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Bronte, Woolf, Eliot, Rhys, Nabokov, Barthelme, Rushdie, and Kincaid. —M. Vandenburg.  Tu 4:10-6pm.

Section 6: Modernist Visions: Conrad, Eliot, Woolf
Themes of the heart of darkness, the waste land, and voyages, in the first decades of the 20th century. London; overseas; gender divisions; fragmentation and reconstruction.—C. Brown.  W 4:10-6 pm.


ENGL BC 3999x, y: Independent Study
Senior majors who wish to substitute Independent Study for one of the two required senior seminars should consult the chair.  Permission is given rarely and only to students who present a clear and well-defined topic of study, who have a epartment sponsor, and who submit their proposals well in advance of the semester in which they will register.  There is no independent study for screenwriting or film production.  Permission of instructor and Department Chair.  4 points.


Cross-Listed Courses

CLEN 4122y Renaissance Women Writers
An exploration of women writers in Italy, France, and England from the 15th to 17th century.  Poetry, narrative and theater focusing on topics such as love, sex, society, power, and God by Christine de Pizan, Marguerite de Navarre, Gaspara Stampa, Louise Labé, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Wroth, Margaret Cavendish, Aphra Behn, Madame de Lafayette, and others. —A. Prescott & L. Postlewate.  3 points.  MW 2:40-3:55 pm.

CLEN G 4205x 17th-Century Literature and Culture: Religious Difference and the English Revolution
The course will explore the intertwining of religion, politics, and literature during the seventeenth century, focusing on the English Revolution (1640-1660).  What was the role of religion, and the nature of religious differences in post-reformation England?  Beginning with brief selections from Herbert's The Temple but focusing on writings by religion-political radicals and self-proclaimed prophets such as Gerrard Winstanley and Anna Trapnel but especially Milton (e.g., probably Areopaglitica, Paradise Regained), we will consider the proliferation of religious divisions and sectarian options, anti-Catholicism, the question of Jewish readmission, and the relation between religion and "nation." —A. Guibbory. 3 points. W 4:10-6pm.

CLEN G 4563y Psychoanalysis & Literature: Reading Lacan
Reading excerpts from Lacan's Seminar VI Desire and Its Interpretation with Hamlet; Seminar VII The Ethics of Psychoanalysis with Antigone, Kant, & Sade; Seminar VIII Transference with Plato's Symposium, Seminars XVII on the Four Discourses and XX Encore: On Feminine Sexuality with selected novels and novellas. Emphasis on the relevance of Lacanian thought to literature and culture and to questions of war, science, capitalism, imperialism, and democracy. —M. Jaanus.  3 points.  W 2:10-4 pm.

ENGL W 4670x Film Studies: American Film Genres
Some critics contend that all Hollywood film is either melodrama or morality play, no matter what its claims to the contrary; others see it as purely wish-fulfillment fantasy. This course will examine a range of genres in Hollywood film, while also scrutinizing and questioning the formation and usefulness of genre distinctions. Our orientation will be formal as well as social and historical, as we explore codes and conventions of generic illusion and verisimilitude, the rise and fall of genres (the Western, the "weepie"), increasing self-reflexiveness (in noir, musicals, romantic comedy), genre and acting style, genre-bending and postmodernity, mis en scene. Why are certain genres linked to political parties, as are specific styles of heroism? Genres will include: the Western, War Movie, Romantic Comedy, Horror, Action, Gangster, Melodrama, Social Conscience, Musicals and "Women's films." Two Screenings per week.—M. Spiegel.   3 points.  MW 6:10-7:25pm

CLEN W 4930y Studies in Cultural Criticism: The Making of the Modern Self
This course will attempt to grasp the rise from the Reformation through Romanticism of a “modern” notion of the self.  Our work deliberately the reading list includes literary texts written between 1600 and 1859 (selections from Marlowe, Milton, Cavendish, Wordsworth, Mary Shelley); philosophy (Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Godwin) scientific works (selections from Galen, Paracelsus, Bacon, Boyle, Newton, Darwin) as well as essays by recent philosophers (Le Roy Ladurie, Hadot, Foucault) and historians such as Porter, Baressi and Wahrman.—R. Hamilton. 3 points.  TTh 1:10-2:25 pm.

Barnard Film Studies Program

WMST BC 3117y Women and Film
Films include a selection from mainstream Hollywood, auteur cinema, specifically feminist film and video, and non-Western/Third World cinema.  These films are studied alongside some of the classic works of Western feminist film theory as well as transnational and contemporary feminist writing on film, video, digital media and geo-politics.  We will be concerned with the foreclosure of representation for women in both linguistic discourse and cinematic narrative and also with questions that have been raised by and about the contemporary projects of feminism and feminist studies in relation to globalization, diaspora and struggle.—J. Beller, T 7:10-9:30 pm and Th 4:10-5:30 pm.

FILM BC 3119x: Screenwriting
A practical workshop in dramatic writing for the screen. Through a series of creative writing exercises, script analysis, and scene work, students explore and develop the basic principles of screenwriting. The final product is either a short film script or Act One of a feature-length script.—D. McKenna. 3 points.  W 1:10-4:00pm.
Preference given to juniors and seniors students majoring or concentrating in film who attend the first class session.  Since this is a Film Concentration course, it does not count as a writing course for English majors with a Writing Concentration.

FILM BC 3119y: Screenwriting
Screenplays are the foundation of much of our popular culture, but can they be art?  This intensive writing workshop examines the art and practice of the screenplay form, its root in classical narrative structure, the ways in which it differs from the other written arts, and how one can engage its particular tools to express original ideas.  Weekly writing assignments and class critique form the heart of this workshop.  Students should be prepared to share their work with others and participate fully in class discussion. Students will create two short screenplays and a detailed outline for a feature film script.  All students encouraged, but Junior and Senior film majors will be given priority.—M. Regan.   3 points.  F 10-12:50 pm.

FILM BC 3200x: Film Production
An exploration of basic narrative tools at the filmmaker's disposal, with a particular emphasis on camera work and editing.  Examines basic cinematic syntax that provides a foundation for torytelling on the screen.—S. Luckow. 3 points.  W 2:10-5:00pm.
Prerequisites: ENGL BC3201 and permission of instructor. Sophomore standing.   Enrollment limited to 12 students.

FILM BC 3120y Advanced Screenwriting
A workshop in feature film writing. Students will enter the course with a story idea, ready to start a feature screenplay.  Through lectures and workshop discussions, the course will critique the details of character development and scene construction.  Analysis of student work will prompt generalized conversations/lectures on the fundamentals of film writing.  Emphasis will be placed on character as the engine of story.   Successful completion of FILM BC3119 Screenwriting I or equivalent.  A complete story idea, either original or to be adapted from another form. Sign up through the Barnard English Department required.—G. Gallo.  3 points.  W 6:10-9 pm.

FILM BC 3200y: Film Production
An exploration of basic narrative tools at the filmmaker's disposal, with a particular emphasis on camera work and editing.  Examines basic cinematic syntax that provides a foundation for storytelling on the screen.—S. Luckow.  3 points.  W 2:10-5 pm.
Prerequisites: ENGL BC3201 and permission of instructor.  Sophomore standing.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.

FILM BC 3201x Introduction to Film and Film Theory.
An introductory survey of the history, aesthetics and theories of film.  Topics in American and International cinema are explored through weekly screenings, readings, discussion, and lecture.  A complete introduction to cinema studies, this course is also the pre-requisite for further film courses at Columbia and Barnard.—M. Regan. 3 points.  M 5:40-9:30pm.

FILM BC 3220y Topics in Cinema: War and Propaganda
The course examines the changing role of film in dramatizing, promoting and critiquing American participation in the military conflicts over the past 70 years.  From the gung-ho patriotism of Howard Hawks’s SGT YORK and the front-line reportage of Lewis Milestone’s A WALK IN THE SUN to the ambivalence of John Frankenheimer’s THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE and the calculated cynicism of Barry Levinson's WAG THE DOG, we explore shifting political perspectives and aesthetic strategies.—D. McKenna.  3 points.   T 6:10-10 pm.  Enrollment limited to 55 students.

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