2017-2018

Introductory Courses

 

ENGL BC1204x First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations (Workshop)
(Formerly called “First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History (Workshop).”) Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. Sections will focus on Legacy of the Mediterranean or Women and Culture and meet three times a week. For more information on the curriculum, please visit the Course Website [http://firstyear.barnard.edu/rlh].
4 points

 

ENGL BC1210x and y First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations: Women and Culture
Enrollment restricted to Barnard. May not be taken for P/D/F. Consult the Online Schedule of Classes for section times. See the course website for more information: https://firstyear.barnard.edu/first-year-writing

“Re-vision—the act of looking back, of seeing with fresh eyes, of entering an old text from a new critical direction—is for women more than a chapter in cultural history: it is an act of survival. “Adrienne Rich, “When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-Vision.”

This course offers a revisionist response to the constraints of "the canon," wherein women are often portrayed as peripheral characters, their power confined to the islands of classical witches and the attics of Romantic madwomen. The Women and Culture curriculum challenges traditional dichotomies that cast gender as an essential attribute rather than a cultural construction, and interrogates the categories of both "woman" and "culture" themselves. No two syllabi are exactly the same, but works studied in the fall term readings include Hymn to Demeter; Ovid, Metamorphoses; Sei Shonagon, The Pillow Book; Marie de France, Lais; Kebra Negast; Shakespeare, sonnets; Beauty and the Beast; West African Bride Myth; and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, selected poetry. Spring term readings include Milton, Paradise Lost; Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman; Luisa Valenzuela, selected stories; Eliza Haywood, Fantomine; Lady Hyegyong, The Memoirs of Lady Hyegyong; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Emily Dickinson, selected poetry; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway or A Room of One's Own; Alice Walker, In Search of Our Mother's Gardens ; and Yvette Christiansë, Castaway. Critical scholarship sources include Sara Ahmed, Gloria Anzaldua, Judith Butler, Laura Mulvery, and Michel Foucault.
3 points

 

ENGL BC1211x and y First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations: Legacy of the Mediterranean
Enrollment restricted to Barnard. May not be taken for P/D/F. Consult the Online Schedule of Classes for section times. See the course website for more information: https://firstyear.barnard.edu/first-year-writing

"Custom and authority are no sure evidence of truth." Isaac Watts, Logic; or, The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth (1802)

Where do our (often unconscious) assumptions about our world and our place in it come from? This course explores key intellectual moments in the literature of the Mediterranean world, whose ideas gave rise to the structures governing much of the Western world today -- structures that sustain and perpetuate ideas about power, authority, gender, and morality that influence our lives in ways both visible and invisible. We read these texts, primarily imaginative literature, to see how they reify, comment upon, resist and/or imagine alternatives to existing social and ideological structures; reading in this way allows us to consciously name and examine how ideology both shifts over time and, in vital ways, remains constant, inviting us to question the myth of progress at the heart of canonicity. No two syllabi are exactly the same, but works studied in the fall term include Homer, The Odyssey; The Homeric Hymn to Demeter; Euripides, The Bacchae; Virgil, Aeneid; Dante, Inferno; Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales; Margery Kempe, The Book of Margery Kempe; and Shakespeare. Works studied in the spring term include Milton, Paradise Lost; Voltaire, Candide; ; William Wordsworth (selected poetry); Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Darwin, Marx, and Freud (selected essays); Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Zora Neale Hurston, Of Mules and Men and Their Eyes Were Watching God; Toni Morrison, Beloved; and Nella Larsen, Passing. Critical scholarship from a variety of traditions (feminist, queer, post-colonial) and thinkers (bell hooks, Christine Froula, Edward Said, Karen Horney, Toni Morrison) allows us to interrogate these texts and the traditions they support, complicate, challenge, etc.
3 points

 

ENGL BC1212x and y First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations: The Americas
Enrollment restricted to Barnard. May not be taken for P/D/F. Consult the Online Schedule of Classes for section times. See the course website for more information: https://firstyear.barnard.edu/first-year-writing
This course transcends traditional and arbitrary distinctions separating Caribbean, North, South, and Central American literatures. The Americas emerge not as colonial subjects but as active historical and aesthetic agents. Emanating from what might be called the geographical site of modernity, American literature is characterized by unprecedented diversity and innovation. In addition to classic novels, short stories, and poetry, this multicultural curriculum features works ranging in scope from creation accounts to autobiographies, as well as indigenous genres including captivity and slave narratives that belie New World declarations of independence. No two syllabi are exactly the same, but works studied in the fall term include the Popul Vuh; William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, selected poetry; Phillis Wheatley, selected poetry; William Apess, A Son of the Forest; Esteban Echeverria, "El Matadero"; Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie; Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno. Spring term readings include Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson; Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; José Marti, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes, selected poetry; T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land; Pablo Neruda, The Heights of Macchu Picchu; Machado de Assis, Dom Casmurro; William Faulkner, "The Bear"; Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude.
3 points

 

 

Writing Courses

 

ENGL BC3101x The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit. Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring.
—P. Cobrin, TR 2:40-3:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3102x Academic Writing Intensive
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 8 students. Nomination and instructor's permission required.
Academic Writing Intensive is an intensive writing course for Barnard students in their second or third year. Students attend a weekly seminar, work closely with the instructor on each writing assignment, and meet with an attached Writing Fellow every other week. Readings and assignments focus on transferable writing and revision skills that students can apply to any discipline.
4 points

Section 1         T 2:10-4          C. Lie

 

ENGL BC3104x and y The Art of the Essay
Enrollment limited to 12 students. Students who are on the electronic waiting list or who are interested in the class but are not yet registered MUST attend the first day of class.
(Formerly called Essay Writing.)  English composition above the first-year level. Techniques of argument and effective expression. Weekly papers. Individual conferences. Some sections have a special focus, as described.
3 points

FALL

Section 1         W 11-12:50     A. Schneider
Section 2         R 2:10-4          W. Schor-Haim

Section 3         T 2:10-4          P. Ellsberg

 

SPRING
Section 1         W 11-12:50     A. Schneider
Section 2         T 11-12:50      S. Fredman

Section 3         M 11-12:50     W. Schor-Haim

Section 4         T 2:10-4          C. Lie (this section is only open to BC VISP/international students. If you are an international student who would like to take this section, please email clie@barnard.edu.)
 

 

Creative Writing Courses

 

ENGL BC3105x Fiction and Personal Narrative
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/formsStudents cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

This class centers on the appreciation, analysis, and practice of short literary fiction, including personal narrative. In addition to weekly writing exercises, twice a semester each student will make available to the entire class longer pieces for "workshopping." These pieces will receive written evaluations from instructor and peers both. We will also read and study narrative by published authors -- historical and contemporary. In both student-generated and published work we will consider elements of prose narrative from structure to characterization, plot to voice, etc., in the hopes that such consideration will encourage student writers to expand their writerly repertoire and improve their work in terms of both craft and literary substance.

Section 1         W 4:10-6         T. Szell
Section 2         R 2:10-4          M. Keane (this section is for BC first-years only)

 

ENGL BC3106y Fiction and Personal Narrative
Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms.

This class centers on the appreciation, analysis, and practice of short literary fiction, including personal narrative. In addition to weekly writing exercises, twice a semester each student will make available to the entire class longer pieces for "workshopping." These pieces will receive written evaluations from instructor and peers both. We will also read and study narrative by published authors -- historical and contemporary. In both student-generated and published work we will consider elements of prose narrative from structure to characterization, plot to voice, etc., in the hopes that such consideration will encourage student writers to expand their writerly repertoire and improve their work in terms of both craft and literary substance.

—K. Zambreno, M 2:10-4

3/4 points.

 

ENGL BC3107x Introduction to Fiction Writing
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/formsStudents cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.
 —W. Wang, T 2:10-4
3 points


ENGL BC3108y Introduction to Fiction Writing
Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms.

Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.
 —A. Solomon, R 2:10-4
3/4 points

 

ENGL BC3110x Introduction to Poetry Writing
Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms.  Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
Our objective in this class is to write new poems each week, and find ways to illuminate and articulate our processes as we go along. Among the questions we’ll explore: How do imagination, “real life,” and conscious artifice (among other things) enter into the writing of poems? How does a poem interface with its reader/listener? What’s the role of enigma, or even opacity, in poetry? How much clarity or accessibility is desirable? We’ll read poets representing a range of styles and esthetics, with a slight emphasis on contemporary American work. Regular attendance, full participation in class discussions, keeping an “observations” journal (and sharing writing from it each week), and the submission of a final portfolio of poems written in response to prompts and readings are requirements for earning credit in this class.
— M. Field, W 12:10-2
3 points

BC3110y Introduction to Poetry Writing
Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms.
Welcome to (near) total freedom. This class is an introduction to writing poetry, keeping the taillights of traditional English verse in mind, while exploring contemporary ideas of poetic theory and practice. Poetry prompts, assignments, visiting poets, peer workshops, and attention to revision will help us tease out the Creator within. We will be writing lyric poems, which embody a kind of “psychological wisdom,” giving us a believable representation of what 19th century poet Matthew Arnold called “the dialogue of the mind with itself.” Among the questions we’ll explore: How do imagination, “real life,” and conscious artifice (among other things) enter into the writing of poems? How does a poem interface with its reader/listener? What’s the role of enigma, or even opacity, in poetry? How much clarity or accessibility is desirable? We will also linger over and consider the import and function of the poetic image remembering, as Ezra Pound wrote, “The image is more than an idea. It is a vortex or cluster of fused ideas and is endowed with energy.” Regular attendance, full participation in class discussions, timely completion of assignments journal, and the submission of a final portfolio of poems are requirements for earning credit in this class.
— R. Good, W 2:10-4
3/4 points

 

ENGL BC3113x Playwriting I
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here:

http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/formsStudents cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
A workshop to provoke and investigate dramatic writing.
—E. McLaughlin, M 4:10-6
3 points

 

ENGL BC3114y Playwriting II
Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms.
A workshop to provoke and investigate dramatic writing.
—K. Tolan, R 4:10-6
3/4 points

 

ENGL BC3115x Story Writing I
Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.
—M. Keane, R 6:10-8

3 points

 

ENGL BC3116y Story Writing II
Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms.
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.
—M Gordon, T 2:10-4

3/4 points

 

ENGL BC3117x Fiction Writing
Previous experience or introductory class required. Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/formsStudents cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
"I had given myself up to the idleness of a haunted man who looks for nothing but words wherein to capture his visions."—Joseph Conrad.  Given that reading is the one training tool writers cannot do without, this course aims to demonstrate how one might read as a writer. What sets this course apart is its focus, allotted equally, to creative writing and creative reading. Students will produce original prose fiction—which will be discussed in workshops—and engage in close reading of a wide selection of novels and short stories.

—H. Matar, M 11-12:50
3 points

 

ENGL BC3118x Advanced Poetry Writing I
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/formsStudents cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.

Weekly workshops designed to generate and critique new poetry. Each participant works toward the development of a cohesive collection of poems. Readings in traditional and contemporary poetry will also be included.
—S. Hamilton, M 11-12:50
3 points

 

ENGL BC3120x Creative Non-Fiction: Making Facts Sing
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here: http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/formsStudents cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted.
This course will challenge students to take on what are considered either difficult topics (e.g. in science and math) or "mundane" topics and create convincing and clear narratives therefrom. We will consider writing from John McPhee, Natalie Angier, Oliver Sacks, Nicholson Baker, and others. Through iterative writing exercises, research, and interviews, students will learn how to breathe life into complex material.
—A. Horowitz, T 10:10-12
3 points

 

ENGL BC3122y Creative Non-Fiction: The Gendered Memoir
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms.
A workshop in writing short autobiographical story with particular attention to the role gender plays in shaping experience. Focus on student writing, along with readings
from the work of authors such as Augusten Buroughs; Alice Sebold; Alison Bechdel; Mary Karr, and others.  PLEASE NOTE: This course has been renumbered. It was previously ENGL BC3120, section 3 and has not changed in content.

—J. Boylan, M 6:10-8
3/4 points

 

ENGL BC3125y Advanced Poetry Writing II
Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms.
A further study of poetic practice for committed student-writers with experience in writing and reading poems. In the classroom, student poems and ideas about poetics are shared, questioned, and critiqued. There will also be readings in and critical interpretation of traditional and contemporary poetry.

—C. Barnett, T 10:10-12
3/4 points

 

ENGL BC3134y Creative Non-Fiction
Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms.
In this course, you will learn writing techniques by closely reading masters of creative nonfiction, and using them as a model for your own writing. You’ll learn how to spot and develop story ideas, gather information, and conduct interviews.  We’ll explore issues relating to point of view, tone, diction, and audience.  There will be five creative assignments, including a profile and a personal essay; each student will present drafts for peer review.
—S. Hartman, W 4:10-6

3/4 points

 

ENGL BC3150y: Imagination and Reinvention
Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms.
A creative writing workshop in fiction, devoted to the imaginative process, and most specifically, to the arts of invention and revision. In addition to considering the wellspring of creative ideas themselves, students will write stories in a variety of lengths— moderate, long, and as short-shorts.  Through this process, apprentice writers will become intimate with the most essential aspect of creating imaginative work: the dedication to seeing one’s ideas—just like the human soul itself-- morph and grow over time, until it finds its most perfect draft.
—J. Boylan, T 4:10-6

3/4 points

 

 

 

Speech Courses

 

 

ENGL BC3121x and y Public Speaking
Open only to undergraduates, preference to seniors and juniors. Enrollment limited to 14 students. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.
This course will introduce you to principles of effective public speaking and debate, and provide practical opportunities to use these principles in structured speaking situations. You will craft and deliver speeches, engage in debates and panel discussions, analyze historical and contemporary speakers, and reflect on your own speeches and those of your classmates. You will explore and practice different rhetorical strategies with an emphasis on information, persuasion and argumentation. For each speaking assignment, you will go through the speech-making process, from audience analysis, purpose and organization, to considerations of style and delivery. The key criteria in this course are content, organization, and adaptation to the audience and purpose. While this is primarily a performance course, you will be expected to participate extensively as a listener and critic, as well as a speaker.
—D. Kempf, TR 10:10-11:25
3 points

 

ENGL BC3123x Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit. Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.
Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program.
—P. Cobrin & D. Kempf, TR 10:10-11:25
3 points

Language and Literature Courses

 

ENGL BC3094x The English Conference: Black Life in Digital: from the Zong to Assassin's Creed
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students.  To be taken for p/d/f only. Students must attend all four class sessions in order to receive credit for this course.
How might a digital humanities approach broaden our understanding of Black Atlantic literature and culture? Similarly, how might attending to Black literature deepen our understanding of contemporary technoculture? By combining close reading practice with a digital studies approach to canonical African American literature, this class will help students historicize important cross-fertilizations between Black expressive traditions and a range of contemporary media and technological texts. In addition to reading narratives by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, poetry by Marlene Nourbese Philip, and engaging "let's plays" of two installments of the Assassin's Creed video game series, we will also work with already-existing databases housed at the Schomburg Center in order to produce the final short written assignment.

—Visiting Scholar Marisa Parham (Amherst College), M 4:10-6 on October 16, 23, 30, and November 13
1 point

 

ENGL BC3095y The English Conference: Migration, Immigration, and the Boundaries of American Literature
Enrollment limited to 60 students.  To be taken for p/d/f only. Students must attend all four class sessions in order to receive credit for this course.

How do we think about immigrant literature if the immigrant was here before the literature? How does it look if the literature “came first”? This class will help students think about American literature through the lens of postcolonial theory and practice, and consider what it means to emigrate through genres, periods, and literary structures as writers, artists, and readers/interpreters. In addition to reading narratives of cultural literacy and migration by writers like Frederick Douglass, Malcolm X, and Julia Alvarez, we’ll examine the ways in which contemporary political discourses on immigration and migration generate surprising returns to what we imagine to be either “pre-colonial” or “post-apocalyptic” foundations, via the work of artists like Lin-Manuel Miranda, Sherman Alexie and Viet Thanh Nguyen.

—Visiting Scholar Kristin Sánchez Carter (San Diego Mesa College), TR 4:10-6 on February 6, 8, 13, and 15.

1 point

 

ENGL BC3129x Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890 Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.
Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered.
—Q. Prettyman, TR 1:10-2:25
3 points

 

ENGL BC3130y The American Cowboy and the Iconography of the West

Enrollment limited to 14 students.
We will consider the image and role of the cowboy in fiction, social history, film, music, and art. Readings will include Cormac McCarthy's "The Border Trilogy.”
—P. Ellsberg, MW 1:10-2:25
3 points

 

AFEN BC3134x Unheard Voices: African Women's Literature. 4 points.
(Formerly AFRS BC3134.) How does one talk of women in Africa without thinking of Africa as a 'mythic unity'? We will consider the political, racial, social and other contexts in which African women write and are written about in the context of their located lives in Africa and in the African Diaspora.

—Y. Christiansë, T 2:10-4

ENGL BC3142y Major English Texts II
Enrollment limited to 25 students.
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Spring: Romantic poets through the present.
—P. Ellsberg, MW 2:40-3:55

3 points

ENGL BC3141x Major English Texts I

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25 students.
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works.  Fall: Beowulf through Johnson.

—P. Ellsberg, MW 2:40-3:55
3 points

ENGL BC3147y Introduction to Narrative Medicine

Enrollment limited to 14 students.

Narrative Medicine was designed to give doctors and healthcare professionals a more profound understanding of, and empathy for, the experience of illness. It teaches how to listen and what to listen for. While the skills developed are directly applicable to the practice of medicine, they are also important in any field in which human relationships are central: business, law, architecture, social work, and the creative arts. The multidisciplinary course entails a rigorous integration of didactic and experiential methodology to develop a heightened awareness of self and others and build a practical set of narrative competencies.

—C. Friedman, T 12:10-2

4 points

 

ENGL BC3155y Canterbury Tales

Chaucer as inheritor of late-antique and medieval conventions and founder of early modern literature and the fiction of character. Selections from related medieval texts.

—C. Baswell, TR 4:10-5:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3159-BC3160 - THE ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM PREFACE:
Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Required of all English majors in their junior year. 

All sections of BC3159 (fall semester) are on the Renaissance; all sections of BC3160 (spring semester) are on the Enlightenment.
4 points

 

ENGL BC3159 (fall semester):
In the Renaissance colloquium we will examine English and European imaginative and intellectual life from the sixteenth to mid-seventeenth centuries. Defined by humanism, the Protestant Reformation, and revolution, this was a period of ideological struggle on many levels. Long-held ways of ordering the world came under increasing strain—and sometimes ruptured irreparably. Writers discussed and debated the aims of human knowledge, retooled old literary forms for new purposes, scrambled to take account of an expanded awareness of the globe, and probed the tension between belief and doubt. Throughout this process, they experimented with new literary styles to express their rapidly changing worldviews. This is an intensive course in which we will take multiple approaches to a variety of authors that may include Petrarch, Erasmus, Machiavelli, Castiglione, More, Rabelais, Luther, Calvin, Montaigne, Spenser, Bacon, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Milton, and Behn, among others.

 

Section 1         T 4:10-6          R. Eisendrath
Section 2         W 2:10-4         M. Jaanus
Section 3         M 12-1:50       A. Prescott

Section 1         W 11-12:50     A. Guibbory


ENGL BC3160 (spring semester):
In the Enlightenment colloquium we will look at English and European imaginative and intellectual life during the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. During this period, writers tried in new ways to reconcile the tensions between reason and religion. Categories of thought that underlie our world today were taking shape: secularity, progress, the public and the private, individual rights, religious tolerance. Writers articulated principles of equality in an era of slavery. Literary forms like the novel, which emerges into prominence during this period, express in irreducibly complex ways these and other changes. In this intensive course, we will study from multiple angles a variety of authors that may include Hobbes, Dryden, Locke, Spinoza, Lafayette, Defoe, Swift, Pope, Richardson, Voltaire, Fielding, Johnson, Diderot, Sterne, and Wollstonecraft, among others.

 

Section 1         R 4:10-6          A. Schneider
Section 2         W 12:10-2       M. Jaanus
Section 3         M 10:10-12     J. Basker

Section 4         W 2:10-4         A. Guibbory


 

ENGL BC3163y Shakespeare I
Enrollment limited to 60 students.
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances. Please note that you do not
need to take ENGL BC3163: Shakespeare I and ENGL BC3164: Shakespeare II in sequence; you may take them in any order.
—R. Eisendrath, MW 4:10-5:25
3 points

 

ENGL BC3164x Shakespeare II
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students.
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.
—P. Platt, MW 8:40-9:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3166y 17th-Century Prose and Poetry

The seventeenth-century produced great lyric poetry exploring love and desire, doubt and faith, sex and God. It was also a century of intellectual, political, and religious revolutions, giving birth to modern ways of thinking. We will read poetry by John Donne, Aemelia Lanyer, George Herbert, Robert Herrick, Andrew Marvell, but we will begin with extended attention to Donne, whose poetry continues to influence contemporary poetry. For science, politics, religion, and philosophy and how they are intertwined, we will read prose by Francis Bacon (on “modern experimental science”) and Thomas Browne (on science and faith), Thomas Hobbes (government as the solution to a brutish life) and the radical "Levelers" (early communists), “mad” Margaret Cavendish, and the Quaker Margaret Fell (defense of women’s right to preach). Fascinating readings, understood in their historical context with a sense of their current resonance.
—A. Guibbory, MW 11:40-12:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3167x Milton

Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes and selections of Milton's earlier poetry and prose (defenses of free press, divorce, individual conscience, political and religious liberty) read within the context of religious, political, and cultural history, but with a sense of connection to present issues.

—A. Guibbory, MW 2:40-3:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3171x The Novel and Psychoanalysis

The novel in its cultural context, with an emphasis on psychoanalysis. Reading selected novels from Austen to W.G. Sebald.

—M. Jaanus, MW 11:40-12:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3173x The Eighteenth-Century Novel
The development of the novel form in Great Britain.  Topics will include: epistolary fiction, the novel of sentiment, Gothicism; the novel's roots in romance, satire, and the picaresque; modern theories of the origins and development of the novel. Works by: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, Austen, and others.
—R. Hamilton, TR 11:40-12:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3176x The Romantic Era

Romantic writers in their intellectual, historical, and political context, with reference to contemporary movements in philosophy, music, and the plastic arts. Authors include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats. An emphasis on close reading of the poetry.

—R. Hamilton, TR 1:10-2:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3177y Victorian Age in Literature: The Novel

Enrollment limited to 60 students.

This course explores important works from one of the most vibrant periods in the history of the novel. Beginning with Jane Austen, the most significant transitional figure from the preceding period, other authors may include Gaskell, Dickens, C. Brontë, Eliot, Hardy, and James. While attending to form and style, we will focus on the relation of these fictional worlds to the social realities of the time, and on how the novels reflect and challenge Victorian ideas about self and society, education, ambition and social class, femininity and desire, labor and domesticity.

—M. Cohen, TR 1:10-2:25

3 points

 

ENGL BC3178 Victorian Poetry & Criticism

Poetry, art, and aesthetics in an industrial society, with emphasis on the role of women as artists and objects. Poems by Tennyson, Arnold, Christina and D.G. Rossetti, Swinburne, and Elizabeth and Robert Browning; criticism by Ruskin, Arnold, and Wilde; paintings by the Pre-Raphaelites and Whistler; photographs by J.M. Cameron.
—W. Sharpe, TR 10:10-11:25

3 points

ENGL BC3179 American Literature to 1800 

Early American histories, autobiographies, poems, plays, and novels tell stories of pilgrimage and colonization; private piety and public life; the growth of national identity; Puritanism, Quakerism, and Deism; courtship and marriage; slavery and abolition. Writers include Bradford, Shepard, Bradstreet, Taylor, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Franklin, Woolman, and Brown.

—L. Gordis, MW 11:40-12:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3180y American Literature 1800-1870 

Texts from the late Republican period through the Civil War explore the literary implications of American independence, the representation of Native Americans, the nature of the self, slavery and abolition, gender and woman's sphere, and the Civil War. Writers include Irving, Emerson, Poe, Fuller, Thoreau, Douglass, Stowe, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.

—L. Gordis, MW 2:40-3:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3181y American Literature 1871-1945

This interdisciplinary course situates late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature within the context of historical and cultural change. Students read works by Whitman, Melville, Twain, James, Griggs, Wharton, Cather, Faulkner, and Hurston alongside political and cultural materials including Supreme Court decisions, geometric treatises, composite photography and taxidermic tableaux.
—J. Kassanoff, TR 11:40-12:55
3 points

 

ENGL BC3183x American Literature since 1945

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 55 students.

In the wake of World War II, the so-called American Century rises out of the ashes of fascism, haunted by the specter of bombs blurring the boundary between victory and defeat. An ideological civil war ensues, punctuated by literary resistance to grand narratives and their discontents. Authors include Ellison, O’Connor, Ginsberg, Bishop, Pynchon, Robinson, Merrill, Morrison, Didion, and Wallace.
—M. Vandenburg, TR 4:10-5:25

3 points

ENGL BC3189y Postmodernism

Enrollment limited to 56 students.

This course considers how Postmodernism's profound distrust of language and narrative transforms the form and function of literature. Writers include Stoppard, Pynchon, Didion, Morrison, Robinson, Coetzee, Ishiguro, Wallace, Ashbery, and Hejinian.
—M. Vandenburg TR 2:40-3:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3192x Exile and Estrangement in Global Literature
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students.
"I would never be part of anything. I would never really belong anywhere, and I knew it, and all my life would be the same, trying to belong, and failing. Always something would go wrong. I am a stranger and I always will be, and after all I didn’t really care."—Jean Rhys.

This course examines the experiential life of the novelist as both artist and citizen. Through the study of the work of two towering figures in 20th century literature, we will look at the seemingly contradictory condition of the novelist as both outsider and integral to society, as both observer and expresser of time’s yearnings and passions. In different ways and with different repercussions, Jean Rhys and Albert Camus were born into realities shaped by colonialism. They lived across borders, identities and allegiances. Rhys was neither black-Caribbean nor white-English. Albert Camus could be said to have been both French and Algerian, both the occupier and the occupied, and, perhaps, neither. We will look at how their work reflects the contradictions into which they were born. We will trace, through close reading and open discussion, the ways in which their art continues to have lasting power and remain, in light of the complexities of our own time, vivid, true and alive. The objective is to pinpoint connections between novelistic form and historical time. The uniqueness of the texts we will read lies not just in their use of narrative, ideas and myths, but also in their resistance to generalization. We will examine how our novelists’ existential position, as both witnesses and participants, creates an opportunity for fiction to reveal more than the author intends and, on the other hand, more than power desires.
—H. Matar, M 4:10-6
4 points

 

ENGL BC3193x and y Critical Writing
Open only to Barnard students. Enrollment in each section is limited to 10 students.
Provides experience in the reading and analysis of literary texts and some knowledge of conspicuous works of literary criticism. Frequent short papers. Required of all majors before the end of the junior year. Sophomores are encouraged to take it in the spring term even before officially declaring their major. Transfer students should plan to take BC3193 in the autumn term.
4 points

 

FALL

Section 1         W 4:10-6         R. Eisendrath
Section 2         R 10:10-12      R. Abramowitz

Section 3         M 4:10-6         M. Spiegel

Section 4         T 4:10-6          T Szell

 

SPRING

Section 1         W 4:10-6         T. Szell
Section 2         R 2:10-4          A. Lynn

Section 3         M 12:10-2       S. Pedatella

Section 4         W 11-12:50     J. Pagano

 

ENGL BC3195x Modernism

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 56 students.  
Psychoanalysis, world war, and shifting gender paradigms inspire fragmented narratives, stream-of-consciousness prose, and improbable blends of erudition and the avant-garde. Stylistic innovation notwithstanding, Modernism authorizes a remarkably traditional literary canon. Special attention will be devoted to how seminal manifestos, most notably “Tradition and the Individual Talent” and A Room of One’s Own, frame the movement’s embattled aesthetics. Works by Eliot, Woolf, Barnes, Faulkner, Hemingway, Joyce, Lawrence, Pound, Stein, Toomer, and Yeats.
—M. Vandenburg, TR 2:40-3:55

3 points

 

ENGL BC3252x Contemporary Media Theory
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through myBarnard or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.
Explores the transformation of sociality, consciousness and geo-politics by and as media technologies during the long 20th century. Students will read influential works of media analysis written during the past century, analyze audio-visual analog and digital media, and explore political theory and media theory written since the rise of the internet. Final projects on contemporary media forms.
—J. Beller, W 12:10-2
4 points

 

AFEN BC3253y Before ‘Black Lives Matter’: Reading Insurrection on Trial

Black Lives Matter is an American phenomenon. This course situates BLM in relation to other and earlier movements in the Global South and elsewhere. Through textual analysis and critical reading, we take up the discursive, rhetorical, and poetical strategies of opposition to marginalization, criminalization, and racial othering. Our readings will cross genres. Our readings include contextualizing legal positions (Acts, Ordinances, etc.), opinion pieces and other forms in which theories about raced space and racial othering were grounded. In addition to foregrounding race and belonging, the themes and concerns that underpin our work include space and nation; nationality and citizenship; sexuality.

—Y. Christiansë, R 2:10-4

 

ENRE BC3810y Literary Approaches to the Bible

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students.

Interpretive strategies for reading the Bible as a work with literary dimensions. Considerations of poetic and rhetorical structures, narrative techniques, and feminist exegesis will be included. Topics for investigation include the influence of the Bible on literature.
—P. Ellsberg, T 2:10-4

4 points

 

Independent Studies and Senior Seminars

 

ENGL BC3996x and y Special Project in Theatre or Critical Interpretation.
Application required: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms#specialprojects.
Senior English majors who are concentrating in theatre and who have completed three courses in theatre history/dramatic literature will normally take this Special Project in combination with an additional dramatic literature course. This combined special project counts in place of one senior seminar. In certain cases, Independent Study (ENGL BC 3999 - see below) may be substituted for the Special Project. In rare cases, the English Department Chair may permit an English major not concentrating in theatre to take ENGL BC3996 in combination with another course.
1 point

ENGL BC3901-3917 – SENIOR SEMINARS PREFACE: 
Enrollment in each section limited to 10 students.
An FAQ about the senior seminar enrollment process can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/senior-seminar-information. Please read through all the questions carefully. If you have a question about the process that's not answered by the FAQ, please email Sarah Pasadino at spasadin@barnard.edu.
4 points

ENGL BC3901x The Field of the Emotions in Romantic Literature and the Arts, Psychoanalysis, Affective Neuroscience, and Philosophy

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 

An interdisciplinary examination of human feelings, emotions, and passions, with a focus on the romantic era (the poetry of Keats & Shelley, Beethoven's 9th symphony, Turner's paintings), in coordination with more scientific approaches to these phenomena in affective neuroscience (Jaak Panksepp), psychoanalysis (selected Lacan, references to Freud) and philosophy (excerpts and references to Aristotle, Hume, Hegel, & Schiller). A feeling, an emotion, an affect is something that comes into existence or happens or that shows itself (Greek Phainein=to show) without our knowing exactly what it is, what caused it, or what it is "showing" or "saying." How have these phenomena and their function been interpreted? What do we at this point know, how does this compare to earlier speculations, and what should or can we try to do with our emotions and passions?
—M. Jaanus, M 2:10-4

 

ENGL BC3903x Poets in Correspondence

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) How do poets' letters inform our understanding of their poetry?  From the eighteenth to the twentieth century, poets have used their intimate correspondence to "baffle absence," as Coleridge remarked.  This course will examine the ways several masters of the letter (including Cowper, Keats, Dickinson, Eliot, Bishop, and Lowell, among others) shaped their prose to convey spontaneity in paradoxically artful ways, illuminating their major work as poets and making the private letter a literary form in its own right.

—S. Hamilton, T 11-12:50

 

ENGL BC3904x Dickens
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) Charles Dickens: the life, the works, the legend, in as much detail as we can manage in one semester. Reading will be selected by the class, and may include Pickwick Papers, A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield, Bleak House, and selections from his friend John Forster's Life of Charles Dickens.. Special emphasis will be given to the question of what "Dickensian" means, in the context of Dickens's literary style, his genius for characterization, his love of conviviality, and Victorian extremes of wealth and poverty. . Students will be expected to share in creating the syllabus, presenting new material, and leading class discussion.
—W. Sharpe, T 2:10-4

 

ENGL BC3911x Write to Vote
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
This seminar investigates the literary antecedents and cultural aftermath of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, with special attention to gendered and racial narratives of the ballot. Authors include Walt Whitman, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Thomas Dixon, Jr., William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Fannie Lou Hamer and Alice Walker.

—J. Kassanoff, W 10:10-12

 

ENGL BC3914x Sr. Sem:  Exploring the 18th Century

Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors
This seminar will explore selected topics in the 18th century, including the transformation in print culture and development of new genres such as the novel, biography, and popular journalism; the emergence of women writers; the interplay between canonical authors and newcomers such as working class and Black writers; the literature of slavery and abolition; poetic experimentation; and the turn to Romanticism. Writers include Behn, Defoe, Pope, Johnson, Richardson, Sterne, Wheatley, Blake, Cowper, Equiano, Boswell, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, and Austen. Students will be invited to propose additional writers for our weekly discussions and to include in their projects writers beyond the syllabus.

—J. Basker, M 10:10-12

 

ENGL BC3907y Sr. Sem.: Short Fiction by American Women
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
(Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) We will explore the rich variety of fiction in shorter forms—short stories and novellas—written by American women. Writers to be studied will include Porter, Stafford, Welty, O'Connor, Olsen, Paley.
—M. Gordon, M 6:10-8

 

ENGL BC3915 Sr. Sem: Late Shakespeare: Visions and Revisions
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors. 
Othello, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest.
—P. Platt, W 12:10-2
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ENGL BC3908y Sr. Sem.: The American Sublime
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) "The empty spirit / In vacant space": gothicism, transcendentalism, and postmodern rapture. Traces of the sublime in the American literary landscape, featuring Poe, Melville, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Stevens, Bishop, Didion, and Robinson.
—M. Vandenburg, W 11-12:50

ENGL BC3909y Sr. Sem.: The Family in Fiction & Film: The Poetics of Growing Up
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior Film majors/concentrators.
(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) Looking closely at late Twentieth and Twenty-First Century stories, novels, memoir and films that center on the logic, dysfunction, romance, system, morphing, divorcing and curious maturation of the family. From Alison Bechdel's graphic novel, Fun Home, to the Korean film, The Host, we will explore fresh and a few classic cinematic takes on this theme. We will explore renderings of "family cultures," family feeling, family values, the family as a narrative configuration, and home as a utopian space, a nightmarish landscape, a memory palace and more. Authors and directors will include: Wes Anderson, Gaston Bachelard, Mira Bartok, Alison Bechdel, Joon-ho Bong, Jonathan Franzen, Vivien Gornick, Lasse Hallstrom, Tamara Jenkins, Ang Lee, Mike Leigh, Jim, Sheridan, Todd Solondz, Francois Truffaut, Tennessee Williams, D. W. Winnicott, Andrei Zvyagintsev.
—M. Spiegel, R 4:10-6

ENGL BC3912y Sr. Sem.: Utopias and Dystopias
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
(Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) A look first at Thomas More’s Utopia and then at the dreams or nightmares it inspired, whether hopeful, ironic, serious, parodic, speculative, nightmarish, or simply interrogatory. Authors include More, Rabelais, Bacon, Margaret Cavendish, William Morris, Bellamy, H.G. Wells, George Orwell, Ursula LeGuin and, if there is time, R.A. Lafferty’s scifi novel starring More and also a young adult novel by Lois Lowry.
—A. Prescott, T 2:10-4

ENGL BC3916y: Sr. Sem.: Gender, Sexuality and the American Stage: Performing the Body Politic
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
This seminar investigates how American theatre/performance, as read through the lens of gender and sexuality, operates as a cultural force. Simply put, the U.S. is obsessed with sex; theatre/performance has proven a fertile medium for America’s expression of this obsession. Exploring texts from the seventeenth through the twenty-first centuries, we will consider how performance intersects with the nation state’s desire to regulate how we “practice” gender both publicly and behind closed doors. How is performance, which always includes gendered/raced/classed/sexualized bodies, situated in relationship to ideas of a national body politic? How does the American nation state hinge on how gender and sexuality are performed both on-stage and off? Authors include John Winthrop, Dion Boucicualt, Lillian Hellman, Tennessee Williams, David Henry Hwang, Michel Foucault, Jose Muñoz, Jill Dolan, Suzan-Lori Parks, Holly Hughes, Tony Kushner, Lisa Kron, Margaret Cho and performance groups Split Britches, Five Lesbian Brothers, Pomo Afro Homos.
—P. Cobrin, W 2:10-4

ENGL BC3917y: Sr. Sem.: Words & Pictures: The Intersection of Literary and Visual Art
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
In this class we will explore literary texts that focus on visual experience, especially painting and sculpture. What kinds of questions do these texts raise about the nature of aesthetic experience? How does what we mean by aesthetic experience change through time? Our readings will range from ancient to modern: Homer, Ovid, Catullus, Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Diderot, Balzac, Zola, Woolf, Sebald, among others. We will also read widely in the history of aesthetic philosophy and critical theory.
—R. Eisendrath, T 4:10-6

 

ENGL BC3999x and y Independent Study
Application required: https://english.barnard.edu/departmental-forms#specialprojects.
Senior majors who wish to substitute Independent Study for one of the two required senior seminars should consult the Department Chair. Permission is given rarely and only to students who present a clear and well-defined topic of study, who have a department sponsor, and who submit their proposals well in advance of the semester in which they will register. There is no independent study for screenwriting or film production.
4 points

 

Cross-Listed Courses

 

The following two Columbia courses are being given by Barnard English Department faculty and are open to both undergraduate and graduate students. The instructors would like to particularly invite Barnard students to consider taking the courses.  Please feel free to email the instructors with any questions.

 

CLEN GU4015: Vernacular Paleography
Enrollment limited to 12 students. Class will meet on Tuesdays in a Barnard campus classroom (exact classroom TBA) and on Thursdays in the Columbia campus Rare Book & Manuscript Library.
This class is designed to introduce graduate students (and some advanced undergraduates) to the paleography of English vernacular manuscripts written during the period ca. 700 -1500, with brief excursions into Latin and into French as it was written on the Continent.  Students interested in a broader introduction to Latin and the national hands of the Continent should also consider taking Dr. Dutschke’s Latin Paleography course, which is planned to be offered in alternate years to Prof. Baswell’s.

 

The purpose of the course is fourfold: (1) to teach students how to make informed judgments with regard to the place and date of origin, (2) to provide instruction and practice in the accurate reading and transcription of medieval scripts, (3) to learn and use the basic vocabulary of the description of scripts, and (4) to examine the manuscript book as a product of the changing society that produced it and, thus, as a primary source for the study of that society and its culture.

In order to localize manuscripts in time and place it is necessary to examine aspects of the written page besides the script, such as the material on which it is written, its layout and ruling, the decoration and illustration of the text, the provenance, and binding.  It is also necessary to examine the process of manuscript production itself, whether institutional, commercial, or personal. The history of book production and of decoration and illumination are thus considered part of the study of paleography, as is the history of patronage and that of libraries; the German term Handschriftenkunde well describes the subject.  Manuscripts are among the most numerous and most reliable surviving witnesses to medieval social and intellectual change, and they will be examined as such.

 

To become proficient in the study of manuscripts it is necessary to look at manuscripts, as well as to read about them.  The more time you are able to spend looking at manuscripts critically, in the manuals and in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the greater will be your first-hand experience and hence your reliable knowledge.
—C. Baswell, TR 10:10-12
3 points

 

CLEN GU4822 The 19th-Century European Novel
A lecture course open to all.

The 19th-Century European Novel in the field of the emotions and in the cultural context of the major thinkers and the major historical events of the era.

 

We will examine feelings, emotions, and passions in the novels from the perspectives of affective neuroscience, psychoanalysis, and philosophy in order to lay bare more clearly what is known and believed versus what is unknown, ignored or latent about human emotional reality at this time.

 

Reading: Austen, Kleist (novella), Emily Bronte, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Hardy, D.H. Lawrence.  No reading outside of the novels will be required on your part.

 

Further, my aim is to expand our cultural knowledge of the era by including the conceptual contributions and formative ideas of major 19th-century thinkers in my lectures on the novels. Optional Reading of short selections from: Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Darwin, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Freud.

 

Those who wish to read and write in a comparative way or on any of the optional writers will be able to do so in lieu of one or, possibly, two novels.

—M. Jaanus, TR 11:40-12:55
3 points
 

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