2011 - 2012

Introductory

ENGL BC 1201x and y First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History
[See course website [<http://barnard.edu/arx/html/reinventingliteraryhistory/] for more information] Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively.  Sections of the course are grouped in three clusters: I. Legacy of the Mediterranean; II.  The Americas; III. Women and Culture.  The first cluster features a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture.  Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of canonicity, the last two clusters feature curricula that explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in culture.
Prerequisites: Required for all first-year students. Enrollment restricted to Barnard. May not be taken for P/D/F. Consult department bulletin board for section times.
3 points

ENGL BC 1204x First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History (Workshop)

Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. All sections of this course are Legacy of the Mediterranean, feature a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture, and meet three times a week.
Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.  Consult department bulletin board for section times.
4 points

Section 1: MWF 10:35-11:50 —M. Kolisnyk

Section 2: TThF 11:00-12:15 —W. Schor-Haim

Section 3: M 1:10-2:25 TR 1:10-2:25 —S. Fredman

Section 4: TThF 2:40-3:55 —L. Mehta


Writing

ENGL BC 3101x The Writer’s Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing
Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring. —P. Cobrin, TTh 11:00-12:15
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit.
3 points

ENGL BC 3102x Writing Tutorial
Writing Tutorial is an intensive writing course for second-year Barnard students. Students will attend a weekly seminar and schedule an individual 30-minute conference with the instructor each week. This focused, individual attention to a student’s writing is designed to help the student strengthen her critical thinking, reading and writing skills. —W. Schor-Haim, Th 2:10-4:00
Prerequisites: Nomination and permission of instructor. 
4 points


ENGL BC 3103x and y Essay Writing
English composition above the first-year level.  Techniques of argument and effective expression. Weekly papers. Individual conferences.  Some sections have a special focus, as described.
Prerequisites: Can count towards major. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.’s Announcements Page: http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/news-center
3 points

 

Fall:

Section 1: T 2:10-4:00 —M. Ellsberg
Section 2: Th 9:00-10:50 —W. Schor-Haim
Section 3: W 2:10-4:00 —D. Levine

 

Spring:

Section 1: Th 4:10-6:00 — A. Schneider

Section 2: W 2:10-4:00 — S. Fredman

Section 3: T 9:00-10:50 — W. Schor-Haim


Creative Writing

Registration in each course is limited and the permission of the instructor is required; for courses 3105-3120, submit a writing sample in advance.  Departmental applications forms, (available in the department office, Room 417 Barnard, and on the Forms section of the department website [http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms] and writing samples must be filed with the Director of Creative Writing, Professor Timea Szell (423 Barnard) before the end of the program planning period.  Two creative writing courses may not be taken concurrently.

ENGL BC 3105x Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing.—N. Hermann, Th 4:10-6:00
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.
3 points

ENGL BC 3106y Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing —T. Szell, W 4:10–6:00
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.
3 points

ENGL BC 3107x Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting —N. Laird, W 9:00-10:50
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details. 
3 points

ENGL BC 3108y Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting —D. Smith, M 4:10-6:00
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.
3 points

ENGL BC 3110x and y Introduction to Poetry Writing
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques.
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details. 
3 points

Fall:

Section 1: Th 11:00-12:50 —Y. Christiansë

 

Spring:

Section 1: TH 2:10-4:00 —C. Barnett

ENGL BC 3113x Playwriting I
Workshop to facilitate the crafting of a dramatic play with a bent towards the full length form. —E. McLaughlin, M 4:10-6:00
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details. 
3 points

ENGL BC 3114y Playwriting II
Workshop to facilitate the crafting of a dramatic play with a bent towards the full length form. —T. Barfield, Th 4:10-6:00
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.
3 points

ENGL BC 3115x Story Writing I
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story. —M. Gordon, M 6:10-8:00
Prerequisites: Some experience in writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details. 
3 points

ENGL BC 3116y Story Writing II
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story. —M. Gordon, M 6:10-8:00
Prerequisites: Some experience in writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.
3 points

ENGL BC 3117x or y Fiction Writing
Assignments designed to examine form and structure in fiction.
Prerequisites: Previous experience or introductory class strongly recommended.  Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.
3 points

Fall:

Section 1: F 11:00-12:50 —S. Nayman

 

Spring:

Section 1: M 12:10-2:00 —M. Keane

ENGL BC 3118x Advanced Poetry Writing
Weekly workshops designed to critique new poetry. Each participant works toward the development of a cohesive collection of poems. Short essays on traditional and contemporary poetry will also be required. —S. Hamilton, Th 2:10-4:00
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details. 
3 points

ENGL BC 3120x and y Creative Non-Fiction
Explores how to apply a literary sensibility to such traditional forms of Non-Fiction as the personal essay, general essay, profile, and feature article.
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details. 
3 points

Fall:

Section 1: Th 2:10-4:00 —P. Devlin

 

Spring:
Section 1: T 6:10-8:00 —J. Fenton

 

ENGL BC 3125y Advanced Poetry II

A further study of poetic practice for committed student-writers with considerable experience in writing and reading poems.  In the classroom student poems and ideas about poetics are shared, questioned, and critiqued.  Readings in and critical interpretation of traditional and contemporary poetry will also be required. —S. Hamilton, Th 4:10-6:00
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.
3 points


Speech

 

Registration in the courses are limited. See instructions under each class listing for sign-up details.

ENGL BC 3121x or y Public Speaking
Effective oral presentation in speeches, discussions, and interviews.  We will explore the reciprocal relationship between active listening and extemporaneous speaking, structured writing and spontaneous remarks, rhetorical strategy and audience analysis, historical models and contemporary practice.
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Preference given to juniors and seniors.  Attend first class for instructor permission.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.
3 points

Fall:

Section 1: TTh 1:10-2:25 —P. Denison

 

Spring:

Section 1: TTh 10:35-11:50 —P. Denison

ENGL BC 3123x Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking
Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program. —P. Cobrin and J. Zuraw, TTh 2:40-3:55
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit.
3 points


Language and Literature

ENGL BC 3091x: (was 3191x) The English Conference: The Lucyle Hook Guest Lectureship
Various topics presented by visiting scholars in courses that will meet for two to four weeks during each semester.  Topics, instructors, and times will be announced by the department.  Students must attend all classes to receive credit for this course.  [See department website: http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/english_conference for current course topic and more information.] —H. Warshaw, M 6:10-8:00 (Oct 3rd, 10th, 17th, and 24th)
Prerequisites: To be taken only for P/F. Enrollment limited to 60 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page:
 http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/news-center
1 point

ENGL BC 3092y: (was 3191y) The English Conference: The Lucyle Hook Guest Lectureship
Various topics presented by visiting scholars in courses that will meet for two to four weeks during each semester.  Topics, instructors, and times will be announced by the department.  Students must attend all classes to receive credit for this course.  [See department website: http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/english_conference for current course topic and more information.]
-H. Warshaw, M 6:10-8 pm (on October 3rd, 10th, 17th and 24th).
Prerequisites: To be taken only for P/F. Enrollment limited to 60 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page:
 http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/news-center

1 point

ENGL BC 3129x (was 3140x, sec. 1) Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890
Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered—Q. Prettyman, TTh 1:10-2:25
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page: http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/news-center
3 points

ENGL BC 3130y The American Cowboy and the Iconography of the West.
We will consider the image and role of the cowboy in fiction, social history, film, music, and art.  Readings will include Cormac McCarthy's “The Border Trilogy.”—P. Ellsberg, MW 1:10-2:25
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page: http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/news-center NOTE: This course has been re-numbered. It was previously 3140, section 3 and has not changed in content.
3 points

ENGL BC 3133y Early Modern Women Writers
Despite popular conceptions insisting that the ideal Renaissance woman was silent, as well as chaste and obedient, many women in the early modern period (c. 1550-1800) defied such sentiments by writing, circulating and publishing their own literature. Under the influence of humanism, a generation of educated women arose who would become both the audience for and contributors to the great flowering of literature written in sixteenth and seventeenth century England. As we examine how these women addressed questions of love, marriage, age, race and class, we will also consider the roles women and ideas about gender played in the production of English literature. We will read from a range of literary (plays, poetry, and non-literary (cookbooks, broadside, midwifery books) texts. — K. Hall, Th 4:10-6:00
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25 students.  Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page: http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/news-center  General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
3 points

ENGL BC 3141x Major English Texts I
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Spring: Romantic poets through the present. Guest lectures by members of the department. —P. Ellsberg, MW 11:00-12:15
3 points

ENGL BC 3142y Major English Texts II
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Spring: Romantic poets through the present. Guest lectures by members of the department. —P. Ellsberg, MW 11:00-12:15

3 points

AFEN BC 3148y Literature of the Great Migration: 1916-1970
Explores, through fiction, poetry, essays, and film, the historical context and cultural content of the African American migration from the rural south to the urban cities of the north, with particular emphasis on New York, Chicago, Boston, and Philadelphia. —Q. Prettyman, TTh 1:10-2:25
3 points

ENGL BC 3155y Canterbury Tales
Chaucer as inheritor of late-antique and medieval conventions and founder of early modern literature and the fiction of character. Selections from related medieval texts. — T. Szell, T Th 4:10-5:25
General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
3 points
 

ENGL BC 3159-3160 - THE ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM PREFACE: Required of English majors in the junior year.  Signing up is accomplished through a special tab in eBear.  All sections of 3159 (fall semester) are on the Renaissance; all sections of 3160 (spring semester) are on the Enlightenment. Students may substitute 3 courses--from ENGL BC3154-BC3158, BC3163-BC3164, BC3165-BC3167, BC3169, BC3173, BC3174, BC3179, or ENTH BC3136-BC3137.  Students may also take 1 colloquium and 2 substitutions.  At least one of these courses must cover Medieval or Renaissance material; at least one material of the 17th or 18th Century.  One of these will also count toward satisfying the "before 1900" requirement.
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear.
4 points

ENGL BC3159x (Fall 2011):


Section 1: The English Colloquium: Imitation and Creation
New ideas of the mind's relation to the world.  New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style. —R. Hamilton, M 2:10-4:00.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear.

Section 2: The English Colloquium: Skepticism and Affirmation
The development of modern concepts of subjectivity and authority.  The rise of art and the artist.  Myth versus science.  Knowledge versus experience.  Humanism, Rationalism, Empiricism.  The tension between belief and doubt.  The exploration of limits and the limitless. Definition of the beautiful and the sublime. —A. Prescott, T 11:00-12:50.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear.

Section 3: The English Colloquium: Reason and Imagination
Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience. —C. Plotkin, W 4:10-6:00.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear.

Section 4: The English Colloquium: Order and Disorder
The tension, conflicts, and upheavals of an era in the arts, religion, politics, aesthetics, and society. —T. Szell, W 2:10-4:00.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear.

ENGL BC3160y (Spring 2012)

Section 1: The English Colloquium: Imitation and Creation
New ideas of the mind's relation to the world.  New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style. —J. Basker, M 2:10-4:00.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear.

Section 2: The English Colloquium: Skepticism and Affirmation
—A. Guibbory, T 11:00-12:50.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear.

Section 3: The English Colloquium: Reason and Imagination
Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience. —C. Plotkin, W 4:10-6:00.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear.

(Section 4: Order and Disorder is not being offered in Spring 2012.)
 

ENGL BC 3163x Shakespeare I
Critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances—P. Denison, TTh 10:35-11:50
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 50 students.  Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page: http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/news-center
3 points

ENGL BC 3164y Shakespeare II
Critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances. —A. Prescott, MW 11:00-12:15 (For Spring 2012 only: offered as lecture course – no departmental sign up required.)
3 points

ENGL BC 3167x Milton
Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes and selections of Milton's earlier poetry and prose (defenses of free press, divorce, individual conscience, political and religious liberty) read within the context of religious, political, and cultural history, but with a sense of connection to present issues. —A. Guibbory, MW 2:40-3:55
3 points

ENGL BC 3168y Lyric Poetry: an Introduction
This course studies the lyric poem (primarily in English and English translation), its forms, features, and sources, its histories and traditions in print from the fourteenth to the twenty-first centuries.  We will review sonnets, ballads, hymns, odes, and elegies; fragments and free verse; the pastoral and its relatives (nature poetry, political poetry); the roles of allusion, metaphor, and figuration.  Formal and historical questions will be central to discussions. —S. Hamilton, TTh 10:35-11:50
3 points

ENGL BC 3173x 18th-Century Literature: Novel
We are living in an age of revolutions, sparked by new technologies. During the “long eighteenth century,” print technologies effected a powerful revolution we call “modernity,” and its literary form was the novel. This course will explore the “work of the novel” in relation to politics, sex and self, as well as particular innovations, such as the invention of paper money, the rise of the slave trade, the expansion of literacy, and the evolving science of the brain. We will read novels by Lafayette, Defoe, Cleland, Heywood, Richardson, Fielding, Godwin, and Austen—R. Hamilton, MW 9:10-10:25
3 points

ENGL BC 3176y The Romantic Era
Romantic writers in their intellectual, historical, and political context, with reference to contemporary movements in philosophy, music, and the plastic arts. Authors include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats. An emphasis on close reading of the poetry. —C. Plotkin, TTh 1:10-2:25
General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
3 points

ENGL BC 3179x American Literature to 1800
Early American histories, autobiographies, poems, plays, and novels tell stories of pilgrimage and colonization; private piety and public life; the growth of national identity; Puritanism, Quakerism, and Deism; courtship and marriage; slavery and abolition. Writers include Bradford, Shepard, Bradstreet, Taylor, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Franklin, Woolman, and Brown. —L. Gordis, MW 11:00-12:15
3 points

ENGL BC 3180y American Literature, 1800-1870
Texts from the late Republican period through the Civil War explore the literary implications of American independence, the representation of Native Americans, the nature of the self, slavery and abolition, gender and woman's sphere, and the Civil War. Writers include Irving, Emerson, Poe, Fuller, Thoreau, Douglass, Stowe, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson. —L. Gordis, MW 11:00-12:15
3 points

ENGL BC 3181x American Literature 1871-1945
American literature in the context of cultural and historical change. Writers include Twain, James, DuBois, Wharton, Cather, Wister, Faulkner, Hurston. —M. Vandenburg, TTh 2:40-3:55
3 points

ENGL BC 3183y American Literature since 1945
American fiction, literary and cultural criticism since 1945.  Topics include: the authorial and critical search for the great contemporary American novel, the particularity of "American" characters, genres, aesthetics, subjects, the effect of these debates on canon formation and the literary marketplace. Authors may include: Bellow, Ellison, Nabokov, Kerouac, Didion, Pynchon, Morrison, and Lahiri. —M. Miller, TTh 10:35-11:50
3 points

ENGL BC 3187y American Writers and Their Foreign Counterparts
Developments in modern literature as seen in selected 19th- and 20th-century American, European, and English works by Flaubert, James, Proust, Joyce, Chekhov, Porter, Cather, Ibsen, O'Neill, Fitzgerald, Rilke, and others. — M. Gordon, MW 11:00-12:15
3 points

ENGL BC 3188x The Modern Novel
Examines formal changes in the novel from nineteenth-century realism to stream of consciousness, montage, and other modernist innovations. Contexts include World War I, technology, urbanization, nostalgia, sexuality and the family, mass culture, psychoanalysis, empire and colonialism. Representative works from authors such as James, Forster, Ford, Conrad, Woolf, Joyce. —M. Gordon, MW 11:00-12:15
3 points

ENGL BC 3190y Global Literature in English
Selective survey of fiction from the ex-colonies, focusing on the colonial encounter, cultural and political decolonization, and belonging and migration in the age of postcolonial imperialism. Areas covered include Africa (Achebe, Aidoo, Armah, Ngugi); the Arab World (Mahfouz, Munif, Salih, Souief); South Asia (Mistry, Rushdie, Suleri); the Caribbean (Kincaid); and New Zealand (Hulme). —B. Abu-Manneh, TTh 2:40-3:55
General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL). General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).
3 points

ENGL BC 3192x Estrangement and Exile in Global Novels
This course examines the experiential life of the novelist as both artist and citizen. Through a diverse selection of global novels and novellas (from Latin America to China, from Santa Domingo to Cairo), we will investigate the seemingly contradictory condition of the novelist as both outsider and integral to society, as both observer and expresser of society’s yearnings and passions. Readings include works by Bronte, Turgenev, Kafka, Vargas Llosa, Chang, and Mahfouz. —H. Matar, MW 2:40-3:55
3 points

ENGL BC 3193x and y Critical Writing
(Formerly called Literary Criticism & Theory.)  Provides experience in the reading and analysis of literary texts and some knowledge of conspicuous works of literary criticism.  Frequent short papers. Required of all majors before the end of the junior year.  Sophomores are encouraged to take it in the spring term even before officially declaring their major.  Transfer students should plan to take BC3193 in the autumn term.
Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.  Registration in each section is limited.  Sign-up with the English Department required.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.
4 points

Fall:

Section 1: Th 4:10-6:00 —C. Brown
Section 2: T 11:00-12:50 —M. Cregan
Section 3:W 2:10-4:00 —S. Pedatella
Section 4: M 2:10-4:00 —M. Spiegel
Section 5: T 4:10-6:00 —M. Vandenburg

 

Spring:

Section 1: T 11:00-12:50 —K. Levin
Section 2: Th 4:10-6:00 —C. Plotkin
Section 3: W 11:00-12:50 —J. Pagano
Section 4: W 4:10-6:00 —H. Pilinovsky
Section 5: Th 11:00-12:50 —B. Abu-Manneh

ENGL BC 3195y Modernism
Modernist responses to cultural fragmentation and gender anxiety in the wake of psychoanalysis and world war. Works by Woolf, Joyce, Yeats, Eliot, Stein, Hemingway, Toomer, H.D., Pound, Lawrence, Barnes, and other Anglo-American writers. —M. Vandenburg, TTh 2:40-3:55
General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA).  General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).  General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.
3 points

ENGL BC 3196x Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
Explores the cultural contexts and aesthetic debates surrounding the Harlem or New Negro literary renaissance, 1920-30s. Through fiction, poetry, essays, and artwork, topics considered include: modernism, primitivism, patronage, passing and the problematics of creating racialized art in/for a community comprised of differences in gender, class, sexuality, and geographical origin. —M. Miller, MW 10:35-11:50
4 points

AFEN BC 3525y Atlantic Crossings: The West Indies and the Atlantic World
This course examines the literature of transatlantic travel from Columbus's first voyage in 1492 to Caryl Phillip's recent re-tracing of his mother's migration in The Atlantic Sound (2000) to recent re-imaginings of slavery and the Middle Passage by M. Nourbese Philip and Marlon James.  Even before Columbus's first encounter, the "Indies" sparked English desires for riches and adventure.  We will first investigate how writers promoted an idea of the West Indies and then came to inhabit its heterogeneous spaces, filling them with longing and anxiety.  The class will chart the emergence of modern race thinking from the rich interaction of peoples and goods in the early modern Caribbean.  We will also question how ideals of freedom and "English-ness" co-existed with slavery, bondage and creole life.  The class will then look at the ways later writers revisit the Caribbean's colonial origins and discuss how notions of the West Indies may haunt modern Atlantic travel.—K. Hall, W 2:10-4:00
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page: http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/news-center
4 points

ENRE BC 3810y Literary Approaches to the Bible
Interpretive strategies for reading the Bible as a work with literary dimensions.  Considerations of poetic and rhetorical structures, narrative techniques, and feminist exegesis will be included.  Topics for investigation include the influence of the Bible on literature. — P. Ellsberg, T 2:10–4:00
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page: http://english.barnard.edu/course-information/news-center
4 points

PREFACE for 3996: All independent study projects require a completed form being filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall).  The form can be printed out from the department website [http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms] and is also available at the Department Office.

ENGL BC 3996x Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation
Senior majors who are concentrating in Theatre or Writing and have completed two courses in writing or three in theatre will normally take the Special Project in Theatre or Writing (BC3996 x or y) in combination with an additional course in their special field. This counts in place of one of the Senior Seminars. In certain cases, Independent Study (BC3999 - see below) may be substituted for the Special Project.
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and chair required. In rare cases, with the permission of the chair, a special project in conjunction with a course may be taken by other English majors.
1 point


ENGL BC 3997x Senior Seminars
Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard seniors.
4 points

Section 1: On Happiness
Concepts of happiness as they apply to various novels and novellas from the 18th century to the present. —M. Jaanus, T 11:00-12:50
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

Section 2: Poets & Correspondence
How do poets' letters inform our understanding of their poetry? From the eighteenth to the twentieth century, poets have used their intimate correspondence to “baffle absence,” as Coleridge remarked. This course will examine the ways several masters of the letter (including Cowper, Keats, Dickinson, Eliot, Bishop, and Lowell, among others) shaped their prose to convey spontaneity in paradoxically artful ways, illuminating their major work as poets and making the private letter a literary form in its own right. —S. Hamilton, Th 4:10-6:00
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

Section 3: Close Readings
Fourteen weeks, fourteen poems by Donne, Marvell, Gray, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Stevens among others. Additional readings in the history of science art, philosophy, and literary theory. Our goal will be to think about what it means to read, or look, closely at a poem, a painting, a natural thing. We hope to gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between literature, art, and science as complementary ways of looking at “things.”—R. Hamilton, M 11:00-12:50
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

Section 4: Reading and Writing Women in Colonial America
In April 1645, John Winthrop lamented the sorry state of Ann Yale Hopkins, “who was fallne into a sadd infirmytye, the losse of her vnderstandinge & reason . . . by occasion of her giving her selfe wholly to readinge & writing, & had written many bookes.” Consideration of poetry, autobiographies, captivity narratives, novels, and commonplace books by colonial women, including Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Phillis Wheatley, and Hannah Foster, as well as texts that reveal women's reading and publication practices, such as accounts of Anne Hutchinson and Milcah Martha Moore’s Book. —L. Gordis, M 2:10-4:00
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

Section 5: Modernism in the Making: Origins & Achievements
It is customary to think of modernism as a revolt against “the Victorians.” Modernists themselves are our authority for this view. This course will examine both the revolutions in form and thought that mark the period and the deep continuities that run from the mid-nineteenth into the first third of the twentieth century. The first half of the term will be taken up with major texts of the period in various genres; in the second, texts proposed by seminar members will form the focus of discussion. —C. Plotkin, T 4:10-6:00
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

Section 6: Political Love
A philosophical exploration of notions of “political love” from Aristotle's happiness to Martin Luther King's agape. In what way is love the foundation of human community, and what is a revolutionary conception of love today? —B. Abu-Manneh, T 2:10-4:00
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.


ENGL BC 3998y Senior Seminars
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
4 points

Section 1: Romance
Romance is the most persistent and widespread kind of writing in the west, from high culture to low, yet it fits awkwardly into the critical modes we encounter in the university. This seminar explores the form from antiquity to recent film. One brief paper (two to three pages) per week. —C. Baswell, T 2:10-4:00
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

Section 2: Film: The Family in Fiction & Film: The Poetics of Growing Up
Looking closely at late Twentieth and Twenty-First Century stories, novels, memoir and films that center on the logic, dysfunction, romance, system, morphing, divorcing and curious maturation of the family. From Alison Bechdel's graphic novel, Fun Home, to the Korean film, The Host, we will explore fresh and a few classic cinematic takes on this theme. We will explore renderings of "family cultures," family feeling, family values, the family as a narrative configuration, and home as a utopian space, a nightmarish landscape, a memory palace and more. Authors and directors will include: Wes Anderson, Gaston Bachelard, Mira Bartok, Alison Bechdel, Joon-ho Bong, Jonathan Franzen, Vivien Gornick, Lasse Hallstrom, Tamara Jenkins, Ang Lee, Mike Leigh, Jim, Sheridan, Todd Solondz, Francois Truffaut, Tennessee Williams, D. W. Winnicott, Andrei Zvyagintsev. —M. Spiegel, Th 2:10-4:00 Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English and Film majors.

Section 3: Late Victorian and Modern Drama
Drama in transition. Changing social structures and dramatic structures at the turn of the century. The relationship between convention and invention and the interface of text and performance in the plays of Pinero, Wilde, Shaw, Strindberg, Ibsen, Chekhov, Robins, and others. —P. Denison, W 11:00-12:50
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

Section 4: Home & Away: Encounters with the Self in Other Places
This course draws upon a range of narrative forms, official and archival materials, film and other visual arts and record to consider how explorers, colonial settlers and officials, colonized peoples, refugees and migrants articulate the encounter between what they think they know of themselves and what they are forced to confront in themselves when away from home, or when home is disrupted by strangers who arrive with sets of presumptions and assumptions that become law and policy. Our readings will engage questions about dominance, resistance, hegemony and narration.—Y. Christiansë, M 2:10-4:00
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

Section 5: The Making & Unmaking of the Poetic Cannon
This seminar reviews the emergence of poetry anthologies from the 18th century to the present, while sampling a wide variety of lyric poetry (Renaissance and Romantic to Modernist and Contemporary) and re-examining such issues as what it is we value in poetry and how we might reinvent the "canon" we have inherited. Students will create their own anthologies and have the option to do editorial or critical projects for their final submissions. —J. Basker, W 2:10-4:00
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

Section 6: Modernist Visions: Conrad, Eliot, Woolf
Themes of the heart of darkness, the waste land, and voyages, in the first decades of the 20th century. London; overseas; gender divisions; fragmentation and reconstruction. —C. Brown, W 4:10–6:00
Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

PREFACE for 3999: All independent study projects require a completed form being filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall).  The form can be printed out from the department website [http://english.barnard.edu/forms-procedures/forms] and is also available at the Department Office.

ENGL BC 3999 y Independent Study
Senior majors who wish to substitute Independent Study for one of the two required senior seminars should consult the chair. Permission is given rarely and only to students who present a clear and well-defined topic of study, who have a department sponsor, and who submit their proposals well in advance of the semester in which they will register. There is no independent study for screenwriting or film production.
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Department Chair.
4 points

Cross-Listed Courses

CLEN G 4995x Special Topics in Modern Literature: Reading Lacan
(Seminar). Reading selections from Lacan's Seminar XIV: The Logic of Phantasy 1966-7; Seminar XX: Encore: On Feminine Sexuality, the Limits of Love and Knowledge 1972-3; Seminar XXIV The unknown that knows the unconscious/or blunder takes wings at playing love/death game 1976-7 together with selected novels, short stories, and poems. Emphasis on Lacan's elaboration of the phantasy, the four discourses, jouissance, the formulas of sexuation, and his redefinition of our notions of the imagination, the body, language, and the function of the arts. Consideration of the relevance of his thought to literature, aesthetics, and culture.
-M. Jaanus, W 11:00am-12:50pm
Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Jaanus (mjaanus@barnard.edu) by noon, Wednesday, April 13th, with the subject heading, "Reading Lacan seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Note: When available, an admit list will be posted at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/english/courses_ugsemadmit.htm.
3 points

page last updated 4/24/12