2012 - 2013

Introductory

Any literature course in the department of English fulfills the general education requirement, Literature. Be aware that not all courses automatically qualify.  Eligible courses must clearly emphasize literary texts, methods, and theories.

ENGL BC 1201x and y First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History
[See course website [http://firstyear.barnard.edu/rlh] for more information.]
Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively.  Sections of the course are grouped in three clusters: I. Legacy of the Mediterranean; II.  The Americas; III. Women and Culture.  The first cluster features a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture.  Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of canonicity, the last two clusters feature curricula that explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in culture.
Prerequisites: Required for all first-year students. Enrollment restricted to Barnard.  May not be taken for P/D/F.  3 points

ENGL BC 1204x and y First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History (Workshop)
Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively.  All sections of this course are Legacy of the Mediterranean, featuring a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture, and meet three times a week.
Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.  Consult department bulletin board for section times.  4 points


Writing

ENGL BC 3101x The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing
Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring. —P. Cobrin, T Th 2:40-3:55pm
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit.  3 points

ENGL BC 3102: Writing Tutorial
Writing Tutorial is an intensive writing course for second-year Barnard students.  Students will attend a weekly seminar and schedule an individual 30-minute conference with the instructor each week.  This focused, individual attention to a student’s writing is designed to help the student strengthen her critical thinking, reading and writing skills. —W. Schor-Haim, Th 2:10-4pm
Prerequisites: Nomination and permission of instructor.  4 points

ENGL BC 3103x Essay Writing
English composition above the first-year level.  Techniques of argument and effective expression.  Weekly papers.  Individual conferences.  Some sections have a special focus, as described.
Prerequisites: Can count towards major. Enrollment limited to 12 students.  Sign-up with the English Department is required.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.  3 points

  • Section 1:  T 2:10-4pm  —P. Ellsberg
  • Section 2:  M 2:10-4pm  —W. Schor-Haim
  • Section 3:  W 2:10-4pm  —D. Levine


Creative Writing

Registration in each course is limited and the permission of the instructor is required.  For courses 3105-3120, submit a writing sample in advance.  Departmental applications forms, (available in the department office, Room 417 Barnard, or downloaded from the Forms section of this website. Writing samples must be filed with the Director of Creative Writing, Professor Timea Szell (423 Barnard) before the end of the program planning period.  Two creative writing courses may not be taken concurrently.

ENGL BC: 3105x Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing.  3 points
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

  • Section 1:  T 2:10-4pm  —J. Gilmore
  • Section 2:  W 4:10-6pm  —T. Szell

ENGL BC 3107x Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.  —E. Minot, Th 11-12:50pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3110x Introduction to Poetry Writing
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques.  —N. Laird, W 11am-12:50pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3113x: Playwriting I
Workshop to facilitate the crafting of a dramatic play with a bent towards the full length form.  —E. McLaughlin, M 4:10-6pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3115x: Story Writing I
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.  —B. McKeon, W 11-12:50pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Some experience in writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged.  Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3117x: Fiction Writing
Assignments designed to examine form and structure in fiction.  —D. Pickney, W 2:10-4pm
Prerequisites: Previous experience or introductory class strongly recommended.  Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.  3 points

ENGL BC 3118x: Advanced Poetry Writing
Weekly workshops designed to critique new poetry. Each participant works toward the development of a cohesive collection of poems.  Short essays on traditional and contemporary poetry will also be required.  —S. Hamilton, Th 2:10-4pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC 3120x: Creative Non-Fiction
Explores how to apply a literary sensibility to such traditional forms of Non-Fiction as the personal essay, general essay, profile, and feature article.  —R. Panek, M 11-12:50pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.


Speech

Registration in these courses is limited.  See instructions under each class listing for sign-up details.

ENGL BC 3121x: Public Speaking
Effective oral presentation in speeches, discussions, and interviews.  We will explore the reciprocal relationship between active listening and extemporaneous speaking, structured writing and spontaneous remarks, rhetorical strategy and audience analysis, historical models and contemporary practice.  —D. Kempf, MW 10:10-11:25am.  3 points
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Preference given to juniors and seniors.  Attend first class for instructor permission.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

ENGL BC 3123x: Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking
Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program.  —P. Cobrin, T Th 10:10-2:25pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit.
 

Theatre

ENTH BC3139x Modern American Drama and Performance
Modern American drama in the context of theatrical exploration, cultural contestation, performance history, and social change. Playwrights include Crothers, Glaspell, O'Neill, Odets, Wilder, Stein, Williams, Miller, Hansberry, Albee, Fornes, Kennedy, Mamet, Parks, and Ruhl.  —P. Denison, W 11-12:50pm.  4 points
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

Language and Literature

ENGL BC 3093x (was 3191x) The English Conference: The Lucyle Hook Guest Lectureship
Various topics presented by visiting scholars in courses that will meet for two to four weeks during each semester.  Topics, instructors, and times will be announced by the department.  Students must attend all classes to receive credit for this course.  [See department website for current course topic and more information.]  —R. Trubowitz, four sessions, Th 4:10-6 on Oct. 11, 18, 25, and Nov. 1st.
Prerequisites: To be taken only for P/F.  Enrollment limited to 60 students.  Sign-up with the English Department is required.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.  1 point

ENGL BC 3129x Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890
Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative.  Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten.  Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered.  —Q. Prettyman, T Th 1:10-2:25pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.  Sign-up with the English Department is required.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

ENGL BC3131x The Shadow Knows
The well-known story of Peter Pan’s lost shadow, attached by Wendy, seems to belong to the world of fantasy.  But it reminds us of an everyday fact: in the world of art, shadows are arbitrary.  They can come and go at the whim of artist or writer.  While in life we have shadows with us as long as we breathe, in literature and the visual arts, and often in our spoken words, they require—and deserve—constant attention.  If on a literal level shadows emphasize light, space, and corporeal reality, in artistic uses and metaphoric speech they express some of our deepest emotions, from fear to desire; they invoke mystery and misery; they teach us and tease us.  This course will investigate both real-world and artistic shadows, using texts and images from philosophy, literature, painting, sculpture, photography, and film.  We will study texts by Plato, Pliny, Chamisso, Andersen, Shakespeare, Donne, Dickens, Poe, Conrad, Barrie, and others; and visual images by Masaccio, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Munch, Hopper; Talbot, Stieglitz, Strand, Brassai, Murnau, Wiene, Duchamp, DeChirico, Warhol, and others.  —W. Sharpe, T Th 2:40-3:55pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Sign-up with the English Department is required.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

ENGL BC3137x (Section 1) Wit and Humor in the Renaissance
An examination of the varieties of wit and humor in the European Renaissance, with an emphasis on England. How was wit imagined? What were its benefits? How did laughter affect the body? How does wit relate to cruelty? Authors include Arentino, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Louise Labé, Thomas More, Philip Sidney, John Harrington (inventor of the water closet), John Donne, Aphra Behn, and some joke collections.  —A. Prescott, MW 11:40-12:55pm.  3 points

ENGL BC3137x (Section 2) Coetzee, Ishiguro and Sebald
This seminar will undertake close readings of works by three masters of the contemporary novel.  Their narrative engagements with the watershed events of the Twentieth Century will draw our attention to matters of collective and national memory, dislocation, migrancy, bare life, human rights, dignity, the human and post-human, loss, reconciliation, forgiveness.  The narrative innovations introduced by these authors re-calibrate interiority and advance an ethics of reading.  —M. Spiegel, MW 6:10-7:25pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students with priority given to juniors and seniors. Sign-up with the English Department is required.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

ENGL BC3141x Major English Texts I
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works.  Autumn: Beowulf through Johnson.  Guest lectures by members of the department.  —P. Ellsberg, MW 2:40-3:55pm.  3 points
 

BC 3159x-3160y - THE ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM PREFACE: Required of Barnard English majors in the junior year.  Signing up is accomplished through a special tab in eBear.  All sections of 3159 (fall semester) are on the Renaissance.  Students may substitute 3 courses from ENGL BC3154-BC3158, BC3163-BC3164, BC3165-BC3167, BC3169, BC3173-BC3174, BC3179 or ENTH BC3136-BC3137.  Students may also take 1 colloquium and 2 substitutions.  At least one of these courses must cover Medieval or Renaissance material, and at least one, material of the 17th or 18th Century.  One of these will also count toward satisfying the "before 1900" requirement.  4 points
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to Barnard English Majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear.

ENGL BC3159x:

  • Section 1: The English Colloquium: Imitation and Creation
    New ideas of the mind's relation to the world.  New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style.  —R. Hamilton, W 2:10-4pm
    Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors.
  • Section 2: The English Colloquium: Skepticism and Affirmation
    The development of modern concepts of subjectivity and authority.  The rise of art and the artist.  Myth versus science.  Knowledge versus experience.  Humanism, Rationalism, Empiricism.  The tension between belief and doubt.  The exploration of limits and the limitless.  Definition of the beautiful and the sublime.  —M. Jaanus, T 2:10-4pm
    Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors.
  • Section 3: The English Colloquium: Reason and Imagination
    Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience.  —C. Plotkin, W 4:10-6pm
    Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors.
  • Section 4: The English Colloquium: Order and Disorder
    The tension, conflicts, and upheavals of an era in the arts, religion, politics, aesthetics, and society.  —R. Eisendrath, Th 4:10-6pm
    Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors.

ENGL BC3163x Shakespeare I
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.  —P. Platt. MW 8:40-9:55am.  3 points
Prerequisites: This class is open only to juniors and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 60 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

ENGL BC3174x The Age of Johnson
The works of Johnson, Boswell, and their contemporaries in historic context; rise of the novel (Richardson, Fielding, and Sterne); poets from Pope to Blake and Wordsworth; women writers from Carter to Collier to Wollstonecraft; working class writers; topics include slavery and abolition in literature, the democratization of culture, and the transition to romanticism.  —J. Basker, MW 10:10-11:25am.  3 points

ENGL BC3176x The Romantic Era
Romantic writers in their intellectual, historical, and political context, with reference to contemporary movements in philosophy, music, and the plastic arts.  Authors include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats.  An emphasis on close reading of the poetry.  —C. Plotkin, T Th 4:10-5:25pm.  3 points

ENGL BC3181x American Literature 1871-1945
American literature in the context of cultural and historical change.  Writers include Twain, James, DuBois, Wharton, Cather, Wister, Faulkner, Hurston.  —J. Kassanoff, T Th 11:40-12:55pm.  3 points

ENGL BC3185x Modern British and American Poetry
Poetry written in English during the past century, discussed in the context of modernism, postmodernism, literary theory, and changing social and technological developments.  Students will participate in shaping the syllabus and leading class discussion.   Authors may include Yeats, Williams, Eliot, Moore, Bishop, Rich, Ginsberg, Stevens, O' Hara, Plath, Brooks, Jordan, Walcott, Alexie, and many others.  —W. Sharpe, T Th 4:10-5:25pm.  3 points
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 35 students.  Sign-up with the English Department is required.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

ENGL BC3192x Exile and Estrangement in Global Literature
This course examines the experiential life of the novelist as both artist and citizen.  Through a diverse selection of global novels and novellas (from Latin America to China, from Santa Domingo to Cairo), we will investigate the seemingly contradictory condition of the novelist as both outsider and integral to society, as both observer and expresser of society's yearnings and passions.  Readings include works by Bronte, Turgenev, Kafka, Vargas Llosa, Chang, and Mahfouz.  —H. Matar, M 4:10-6.  4 points
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

ENGL BC3193x Critical Writing
(Formerly called Literary Criticism & Theory.)  Provides experience in the reading and analysis of literary texts and some knowledge of conspicuous works of literary criticism.  Frequent short papers.  Required of all majors before the end of the junior year.  Sophomores are encouraged to take it in the spring term even before officially declaring their major.  Transfer students should plan to take BC3193 in the autumn term.  4 points
Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.  Registration in each section is limited.  Sign-up with the English Department is required.  Registering for the course only through eBear will NOT ensure your enrollment.

  • Section 1  Th 4:10-6  —C. Brown.
  • Section 2  T 11-12:50  —M. Cregan
  • Section 3  W 2:10-4  —S. Pedatella
  • Section 4  T 9-10:50  —C. Baswell
  • Section 5  Th 2:10-4  —L. Gordis


ENGL BC3195x Modernism
Modernist responses to cultural fragmentation and gender anxiety in the wake of psychoanalysis and world war.  Works by Woolf, Joyce, Yeats, Eliot, Stein, Hemingway, Toomer, H.D., Pound, Lawrence, Barnes, and other Anglo-American writers.  —M. Vandenburg, T Th 2:40-3:55pm.  3 points

ENGL 3196x Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
Explores the cultural contexts and aesthetic debates surrounding the Harlem or New Negro literary renaissance, 1920-30s.  Through fiction, poetry, essays, and artwork, topics considered include: modernism, primitivism, patronage, passing and the problematics of creating racialized art in/for a community comprised of differences in gender, class, sexuality, and geographical origin.  —M. Miller, MW 10:10-11:25am.  3 points

ENGL BC3252x Contemporary Media Theory
Explores the transformation of social organization and consciousness by and as media technologies during the long 20th century.  Students will read influential works of media analysis written during the past century, analyze film and digital media, and explore political and media theory generated since the rise of the internet.  —J. Beller, W 11-12:50pm.  4 points
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  Attend first class for instructor permission.  Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.


Independent Studies and Senior Seminars

ENGL BC3996x and y Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation
Senior majors who are concentrating in Theatre or Writing and have completed two courses in writing or three in theatre will normally take the Special Project in Theatre or Writing in combination with an additional course in their special field.  This counts in place of one of the Senior Seminars.  In certain cases, Independent Study may be substituted for the Special Project.
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and chair required.  In rare cases, with the permission of the chair, a special project in conjunction with a course may be taken by other English majors.  An Independent Study Form for BC 3996 must be filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall) in order to generate a call number.  The form can be printed out from the department website and is also available at the Department Office.


BC 3197x-3998y – SENIOR SEMINARS PREFACE:  Enrollment in all sections of ENGL BC 3997 and 3998 is limited to Barnard senior English majors (and Barnard senior film majors for the English/film section).  Signing up is accomplished through a special tab in eBear.  4 points

ENGL BC3997x:

  • Section 1: Humans & Other Animals: Metamorphoses & Blurred Identities
    An interdisciplinary study of the construction of animal identities in selected literary and philosophical texts and the ways in which such representations of non-human animal identities inform conceptions of human identities, including racialized and gendered ones. Readings include Aristotle, Ovid, Descartes, Shakespeare, Kafka, Melville, and Morrison.  —T. Szell, W 11-12:50pm
    Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
  • Section 2: Poets & Correspondences
    How do poets' letters inform our understanding of their poetry?  From the eighteenth to the twentieth century, poets have used their intimate correspondence to "baffle absence," as Coleridge remarked.  This course will examine the ways several masters of the letter (including Cowper, Keats, Dickinson, Eliot, Bishop, and Lowell, among others) shaped their prose to convey spontaneity in paradoxically artful ways, illuminating their major work as poets and making the private letter a literary form in its own right.  —S. Hamilton, Th 4:10-6pm
    Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
  • Section 3: The Art of Jane Austen
    We will read all of her work, as well as the most significant criticism.  Among the topics we will consider: Austen's innovations in plot and character, the relation of her work to the "sister arts," as well as to politics, history, women, and her contemporary allure.  —R. Hamilton, W 4:10-6pm
    Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
  • Section 4: Reading & Writing Women in Colonial America
    In April 1645, John Winthrop lamented the sorry state of Ann Yale Hopkins, "who was fallne into a sadd infirmytye, the losse of her vnderstandinge & reason . . . by occasion of her giving her selfe wholly to readinge & writing, & had written many bookes." This course considers colonial women as authors and as readers, sampling a variety of genres (court transcripts, confessions, poetry, autobiographies, captivity narratives, novels, and commonplace books) and exploring topics including theology, marriage, scribal publication, and the American Revolution.  We will read texts by women writers, including Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Phillis Wheatley, and Hannah Foster, as well as texts that reveal women's reading and publication practices, such as accounts of Anne Hutchinson and Milcah Martha Moore's Book.  —L. Gordis, Th 11-12:50pm
    Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
  • Section 5: Postmodernism
    This course examines literary forms emerging from the rubble of representation produced by the tyranny of progress (mass media, globalization, nuclear proliferation) and the deconstruction of grand narratives.  Writers include Pynchon, Barthelme, Reed, Robinson, Barnes, Coetzee, Ishiguro, Banville, Ashbery, Waldrop, and Hejinian.  —M. Vandenburg, T 4:10-6pm
    Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
  • Section 6: Political Love
    A philosophical exploration of notions of 'political love' from Aristotle's happiness to Martin Luther King's agape.  In what way is love the foundation of human community, and what is a revolutionary conception of love today?  —B. Abu-Manneh, T 2:10-4pm
    Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear.  Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

ENGL BC3999x and y Independent Study
Senior majors who wish to substitute Independent Study for one of the two required senior seminars should consult the Department Chair.  Permission is given rarely and only to students who present a clear and well-defined topic of study, who have a department sponsor, and who submit their proposals well in advance of the semester in which they will register.  There is no independent study for screenwriting or film production.
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Department Chair.  An Independent Study Form for BC 3999 must be filed with the English Department (417 Barnard Hall) in order to generate a call number.  The form can be printed out from the department website and is also available at the Department Office.  4 points
 

Cross-Listed Courses

CLEN G 4995x Special Topics in Modern Literature: Reading Lacan
(Seminar) Reading selections from Lacan's Seminar XIV: The Logic of Phantasy 1966-7; Seminar XX: Encore: On Feminine Sexuality, the Limits of Love and Knowledge 1972-3; Seminar XXIV The unknown that knows the unconscious/or blunder takes wings at playing love/death game 1976-7 together with selected novels, short stories, and poems.  Emphasis on Lacan's elaboration of the phantasy, the four discourses, jouissance, the formulas of sexuation, and his redefinition of our notions of the imagination, the body, language, and the function of the arts.  Consideration of the relevance of his thought to literature, aesthetics, and culture.  —M. Jaanus, M 2:10-4pm.  3 points

page last updated 5/21/13