2013 - 2014

Preface: Any literature course in the department of English fulfills the general education requirement, Literature. Be aware that not all courses automatically qualify. Eligible courses must clearly emphasize literary texts, methods, and theories.

Introductory

ENGL BC1201x and y First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History
Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. Sections of the course are grouped in three clusters: I. Legacy of the Mediterranean; II. The Americas; III. Women and Culture. The first cluster features a curriculum of classic texts representing key intellectual moments that have shaped Western culture. Offering revisionist responses to the constraints of canonicity, the last two clusters feature curricula that explore the literary history of the Americas and the role of women in culture.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Required for all first-year students. Enrollment restricted to Barnard. May not be taken for P/D/F.

FALL

  1. A.Springs MW 8:40-9:55am
  2. S. Sastry MW 10:10-11:25am
  3. A. Lynn MW 11:40-12:55pm
  4. S. Singh MW 1:10-2:25pm
  5. B. Morris MW 2:40-3:55pm
  6. A. Lynn MW 2:40-3:55pm
  7. B. Parker MW 4:10-5:25pm
  8. P. Luhan MW 4:10-5:25pm
  9. L. Mehta TR 8:40-9:55am
  10. K. Levin TR 10:10-11:25am
  11. E. Auran TR 11:40-12:55pm
  12. S. Pedatella TR 1:10-2:25pm
  13. G. Fleischer TR 2:40-3:55pm
  14. H. Pilinovsky TR 2:40-3:55pm
  15. Y. Traps TR 4:10-5:25pm
  16. A. Schneider TR 4:10-5:25pm

SPRING

  1. A.Springs MW 8:40-9:55am
  2. A. Springs MW 10:10-11:25am
  3. A. Lynn MW 11:40-12:55pm
  4. S. Singh MW 1:10-2:25pm
  5. S. Pedatella MW 1:10-2:25pm
  6. A. Lynn MW 2:40-3:55pm
  7. B. Morris MW 2:40-3:55pm
  8. B. Parker MW 4:10-5:25pm
  9. S. Singh MW 4:10- 5:5pm
  10. P. Luhan TR 8:40-9:55am
  11. K. Chez TR 10:10-11:25am
  12. W. Schor-Haim TR 10:10-11:25am
  13. Y. Traps TR 11:40-12:55pm
  14. A. Schneider TR 4:10-5:25pm
  15. M. Vandenburg TR 4:10-5:25pm


ENGL BC1204x First-Year English: Reinventing Literary History (Workshop)
Close examination of texts and regular writing assignments in composition, designed to help students read critically and write effectively. Sections will focus on Legacy of the Mediterranean or The Americas and meet three times a week. For more information on the curriculum, please visit the Course Website. 3 points.

  1. M. Kolisnyk MWF 11:40-12:55pm
  2. W. Schor-Haim TRF 10:10-11:25am
  3. S. Fredman TRF 1:10-2:25pm
  4. T. Gellene MWF 8:40-9:55am

Writing

ENGL BC3101x The Writer's Process: A Seminar in the Teaching of Writing
Exploration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing, designed for students who plan to become Writing Fellows at Barnard. Students will read current theory and consider current research in the writing process and engage in practical applications in the classroom or in tutoring.— P. Cobrin TR 2:40-3:55pm.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit.

ENGL BC3102x Writing Tutorial
Writing Tutorial is an intensive writing course for second-year Barnard students. Students will attend a weekly seminar and schedule an individual 30-minute conference with the instructor each week. This focused, individual attention to a student's writing is designed to help the student strengthen her critical thinking, reading and writing skills—W. Schor-Haim R 2:10-4:00pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 8 students. Nomination and instructor's permission required.

ENGL BC3103x Essay Writing
English composition above the first-year level. Techniques of argument and effective expression. Weekly papers. Individual conferences. Some sections have a special focus, as described.  3 points. Prerequisites: Can count towards major. Enrollment limited 12 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page

  1. A. Schneider R 12:10-2:00pm
  2. W. Schor-Haim T 2:10-4:00pm

ENGL BC3104y Essay Writing English composition above the first-year level. Techniques of argument and effective expression. Weekly papers. Individual conferences. Some sections have a special focus, as described.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Can count towards major. Enrollment limited 12 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.

  1. A. Schneider W 12:10-2:00pm
  2. S. Fredman W 2:10-4:00pm
  3. W. Schor-Haim R 2:10-4:00pm

Creative Writing

ENGL BC3105x Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing.—T. Szell, R 4:10-6:00pm.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC3106y Fiction and Personal Narrative
Short stories and other imaginative and personal writing.—M. Pouncey, R 11:00-12:50pm.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC3107x Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.—J. Gilmore, T 2:10-4.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC3108y Introduction to Fiction Writing
Practice in writing short stories and autobiographical narrative with discussion and close analysis in a workshop setting.—N. Hermann, W 2:10-4.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC3110x and y Introduction to Poetry Writing
Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques.—FALL: Y. Christiansë (T 11-12:50); SPRING: M. Field (W 12:10-2).  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC3113x Playwriting I
A workshop to provoke and investigate dramatic writing.—E. McLaughlin, R 11:00-12:50pm.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details. No First—Year Students.

ENGL BC3114y Playwriting II
Workshop to facilitate the crafting of a dramatic play with a bent towards the full length form.—K. Tolan, R 2:10-4:00pm.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.
NOTE: Playwriting I (ENGL 3113) is NOT a prerequisite, and students need not have written a play before.

ENGL BC3115x Story Writing I
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.—B. McKeon, W 11:00-12:50pm.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC3116y Story Writing II
Advanced workshop in writing, with emphasis on the short story.—M. Gordon M 6:10-8:00pm.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Some experience in the writing of fiction. Conference hours to be arranged. Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC3117x or y Fiction Writing
Assignments designed to examine form and structure in fiction—H. Matar T 4:10-6:00pm.  3 points..  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC3118x or y Advanced Poetry Writing I
Weekly workshops designed to critique new poetry. Each participant works toward the development of a cohesive collection of poems. Short essays on traditional and contemporary poetry will also be required.—C. Barnett, M 11:00-12:50pm.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

ENGL BC3120x and y Creative Non-Fiction
Explores how to apply a literary sensibility to such traditional forms of Non Fiction as the personal essay, general essay, profile, and feature article.—FALL: P. Devlin (R 11:00-12:50pm); SPRING—J. Shulevitz (M 2:10-4:00pm).  3 points..  Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply; see instructions in the preface to the Creative Writing section for details.

Speech

ENGL BC3121x and y Public Speaking
Effective oral presentation in speeches, discussions, and interviews. We will explore the reciprocal relationship between active listening and extemporaneous speaking, structured writing and spontaneous remarks, rhetorical strategy and audience analysis, historical models and contemporary practice.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. Preference given to juniors and seniors.

FALL

  1. P. Denison TR 11:40-12:55pm
  2. D. Kempf MW 10:10-11:25pm

SPRING

  • D. Kempf MW 11:40-12:55pm


ENGL BC3123x Rhetorical Choices: the Theory and Practice of Public Speaking
Speaking involves a series of rhetorical choices regarding vocal presentation, argument construction, and physical affect that, whether made consciously or by default, project information about the identity of the speaker. In this course students will relate theory to practice: to learn principles of public speaking and speech criticism for the purpose of applying these principles as peer tutors in the Speaking Fellow Program.—P. Cobrin and D. Kempf, TR 10:10-11:25.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Application process and permission of instructor. Does not count for major credit. Enrollment restricted to Barnard students.
 

Theatre

ENTH BC3144y Black Theatre
Exploration in Black Theatre, specifically African-American performance traditions, as an intervening agent in racial, cultural and national identity. African-American theater artists to be examined include Amiri Baraka, Kia Corthron, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angelina Grimke,Langston Hughes, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrian Piper and August Wilson. (Also listed as AFRS 3144.  —P. Cobrin, R 9:00-10:50am.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.
 

Language and Literature

ENGL BC3095 The English Conference: 'Speak, memory': Women & Time in Later Medieval English Literature
This course explores some of the ways in which time was experienced and understood in late medieval England by focusing on four fifteenth-century texts in which retrospection is central and gendered.—F. Riddy, T Th 4:10-6 on October 1st, 3rd, 8th, & 10th.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60, sign-up required, 4th floor Barnard Hall.  The last day to register for the class is the day of the second class (10/3/13).

ENGL BC3096y English Conference: "T.S. Eliot, Poet-Critic"
Eliot and the great tradition of the poet-critic, from Dryden to Geoffrey Hill. Eliot as critic of his own work, both explicitly and within the art of revision. Eliot as critic of others’ work, both explicitly and within the art of allusion. The course will draw upon the full-scale edition of Eliot’s poems, edited by Ricks and McCue, to be completed in the summer of 2014.—C. Ricks, MT March 31st & April 1st and April 7th & 8th, 4:10-6 PM.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60, sign-up required, 4th floor Barnard Hall.  The last day to register for the class is the day of the second class (4/1/14).

ENGL BC3129x Explorations of Black Literature: Early African-American Lit. 1760-1890
Poetry, prose, fiction, and nonfiction, with special attention to the slave narrative. Includes Wheatley, Douglass, and Jacobs, but emphasis will be on less familiar writers such as Brown, Harper, Walker, Wilson, and Forten. Works by some 18th-century precursors will also be considered.—Q. Prettyman, T Th 1:10-2:25.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.  NOTE: This course has been re-numbered. It was previously 3140, section 1 and has not changed in content.

ENGL BC3131x The Shadow Knows
The well-known story of Peter Pan’s lost shadow, attached by Wendy, seems to belong to the world of fantasy. But it reminds us of an everyday fact: in the world of art, shadows are arbitrary. They can come and go at the whim of artist or writer. While in life we have shadows with us as long as we breathe, in literature and the visual arts, and often in our spoken words, they require—and deserve—constant attention. If on a literal level shadows emphasize light, space, and corporeal reality, in artistic uses and metaphoric speech they express some of our deepest emotions, from fear to desire; they invoke mystery and misery; they teach us and tease us. This course will investigate both real-world and artistic shadows, using texts and images from philosophy, literature, painting, sculpture, photography, and film. We will study texts by Plato, Pliny, Chamisso, Andersen, Shakespeare, Donne, Dickens, Poe, Conrad, Barrie, and others; and visual images by Masaccio, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Munch, Hopper; Talbot, Stieglitz, Strand, Brassai, Murnau, Wiene, Duchamp, DeChirico, Warhol, and others.—W. Sharpe, TR 1:10-2:25PM.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25 students. Sign up through the Registrar's "L-course" process.

ENGL BC3133x or y Early Modern Women Writers
Despite popular conceptions insisting that the ideal Renaissance woman was silent, as well as chaste and obedient, many women in the early modern period (c. 1550-1800) defied such sentiments by writing, circulating and publishing their own literature. Under the influence of humanism, a generation of educated women arose who would become both the audience for and contributors to the great flowering of literature written in sixteenth and seventeenth century England. As we examine how these women addressed questions of love, marriage, age, race and class, we will also consider the roles women and ideas about gender played in the production of English literature. We will read from a range of literary (plays & poetry) and non-literary (cookbooks, broadside, midwifery books) texts.—K. Hall, Th 2:10-4.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 25 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.

ENGL BC3138x (Section 1) Transformation, Transgression, & Desire
Not offered 2013-14.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 with priority given to Juniors and Seniors. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.

ENGL BC3138x (Section 2) "a d--d mob of scribbling women": 19th-cent. Am Women Writers
In 1855, Nathaniel Hawthorne complained that American publishing was "wholly given over to a d--d mob of scribbling women," and that he could not hope to compete with women writers for popularity or sales. Yet Hawthorne's texts were canonized as American classics, while texts by nineteenth-century women writers were largely ignored by the academy until late in the twentieth century. This course considers a variety of texts by nineteenth-century American women, including novels, short fiction, poetry, and journalism. We'll consider women's writing and women's reading through a variety of lenses, including domesticity and women's sphere, political action and suffrage, the economics of writing and publishing, sentimentality and anger, and canon formation and literary merit. Authors include Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Louisa May Alcott, Fanny Fern, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Susan Warner, Harriet Jacobs, Elizabeth Drew Stoddard, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, and Emily Dickinson.—L. Gordis, MW 1:10-2:25.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 with priority given to Juniors and Seniors. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.

ENGL BC3141x Major English Texts I
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Autumn: Beowulf through Johnson. Guest lectures by members of the department.  3 points. (Not offered fall 2013).

ENGL BC3142y Major English Texts II
A chronological view of the variety of English literature through study of selected writers and their works. Spring: Romantic poets through the present. Guest lectures by members of the department.—P. Ellsberg, 3 points.

ENGL BC3147y Introduction to Narrative Medicine
Narrative Medicine was designed to give doctors and healthcare professionals a more profound understanding of, and empathy for, the experience of illness. It teaches how to listen and what to listen for. While the skills developed are directly applicable to the practice of medicine, they are also important in any field in which human relationships are central: business, law, architecture, social work, and the creative arts. The practice of narrative medicine calls for a rigorous integration of intellect and emotion that helps to develop a heightened awareness of self and others. It is productive - in that its application in the "outside world" is continually called out. It is generative - by developing the capacity to articulate self-knowledge and consciousness of others, personal and professional relationships are changed and the desire in others for the same is catalyzed. Narrative Medicine utilizes both didactic and experiential methodology to build a practical set of narrative competencies and skills. Correlations are consistently made to the practice of medicine in an effort to connect the work of the class to their science-based studies and to their future careers. The mix of students-undergraduate premed and humanities majors-creates a rich variety of perspectives in the classroom that is often missing for students focused on purely scientific or humanities curriculums. Additionally, Narrative Medicine offers the intersection of many disciplines including literature, philosophy, ethics, psychology, creative writing, anthropology and the sciences.—C. Friedman & R. Jones, T 11-12:50.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.

ENGL BC3158y Medieval Lit: Our Past imagines its Past
Chaucer's innovations with major medieval forms: lyric, the extraordinary dream visions, and the culmination of medieval romance, Troilus and Criseyde. Approaches through close analysis, and feminist and historicist interpretation. Background readings in medieval life and culture.—C. Baswell, MW 4:10-5:25.  3 points.

BC 3159-3160 - THE ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM PREFACE: Required of Barnard English majors in the junior year. Signing up is accomplished through a special tab in eBear. All sections of 3159 (fall semester) are on the Renaissance; all sections of 3160 (spring semester) are on the Enlightenment. Students may substitute 3 courses--from ENGL BC3154-BC3158, BC3163-BC3164, BC3165-BC3167, BC3169, BC3173-BC3174, BC3179 or ENTH BC3136-BC3137. Students may also take 1 colloquium and 2 substitutions. At least one of these courses must cover Medieval or Renaissance material; at least one material of the 17th or 18th Century. One of these will also count toward satisfying the "before 1900" requirement.

ENGL BC3159x-BC3160y (Section 1) The English Colloquium: Imitation and Creation New ideas of the mind's relation to the world. New perspectives, the emergence of new forms, experimentation with old forms, and the search for an appropriate style.—R. Hamilton, FALL: T 2:10-4; SPRING: T4:10-6.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear. Corequisites: See "The English Colloquium Preface" above.

ENGL BC3159x-BC3160y (Section 2) The English Colloquium: Skepticism and Affirmation
The development of modern concepts of subjectivity and authority. The rise of art and the artist. Myth versus science. Knowledge versus experience. Humanism, Rationalism, Empiricism. The tension between belief and doubt. The exploration of limits and the limitless. Definition of the beautiful and the sublime.—M. Jaanus, FALL: M 2:10-4 ; SPRING: W 11-12:50.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear. Corequisites: See "The English Colloquium Preface" above.

ENGL BC3159x-BC3160y (Section 3) The English Colloquium: Reason and Imagination
Humanism, reformation, and revolution: the possibilities of human knowledge; sources and strategies for secular and spiritual authority; the competing demands of idealism and experience.—FALL: A. Guibbory (W 11-12:50); SPRING: C. Plotkin (W 4:10-6).  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear. Corequisites: See "The English Colloquium Preface" above.

ENGL BC3159x-BC3160y (Section 4) The English Colloquium: Order and Disorder
The tension, conflicts, and upheavals of an era in the arts, religion, politics, aesthetics, and society.—FALL: R. Eisendrath (W 4:10-6); SPRING: J. Basker (M 11-12:50).  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to Barnard English majors. Sign up through special tab in eBear. Corequisites: See "The English Colloquium Preface" above.

ENGL BC3163x Shakespeare I
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.—P. Platt, .3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students. This class is open to Juniors and Seniors only. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.

ENGL BC3163x Shakespeare II
A critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.—P. Platt, .3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 60 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.

ENGL BC3165x The Elizabethan Renaissance
Literature and culture during the reign of Elizabeth I. Topics include God, sex, love, colonization, wit, empire, the calendar, cosmology, and Elizabeth herself as writer and topic. Authors include P. Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Mary Sidney Herbert.—R. Eisendrath,.  3 points

ENGL BC3166y Seventeenth-century Prose and Poetry
Lyric poetry about love, sex, death, and God by John Donne and others (e.g., George Herbert, Aemelia Lanyer, Mary Wroth, Robert Herrick and Andrew Marvell). Also selections of prose about science, politics, religion, and philosophy (e.g., Francis Bacon, John Donne, perhaps Thomas Browne, and early communists "The Levellers") in this "century of Revolution" that inaugurated more modern ways of thinking and doubting. Donne's poetry and prose may well receive the most extended attention.—A. Guibbory, MW 11:40-12:55.  3 points.

ENGL BC3167x or y Milton
Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes and selections of Milton's earlier poetry and prose (defenses of free press, divorce, individual conscience, political and religious liberty) read within the context of religious, political, and cultural history, but with a sense of connection to present issues.—A. Guibbory, MW 2:40-3:55.  3 points

ENGL BC3169x Renaissance Drama
This class will examine English drama at the moment when it arose as a major art form. In Renaissance London, astonishingly complex plays emerged that reflected the diverse urban life of the city, as well as the layered and often contradictory inner life of the individual. This poetically rich theater was less concerned with presenting answers, and more with staging questions-about gender, race, religion, literary tradition, love, sex, authority, and class. In this course, we will try to tap into this theater's cosmopolitan, enlivened poetics by studying not only Shakespeare, but also the various other major authors who constituted this literary world: Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, and the female playwright Aphra Behn.—R. Eisendrath, T Th 4:10-5:25.  3 points

ENGL BC3173x or y Eighteenth-Century Novel: Origins of Psychology
This course proposes to map a history of psychology through the eighteenth-century novel. In novels, writers and readers imagined their lives, and in so doing created a new, private understanding of their selves, an awareness that comes -- a century later -- to be analyzed by means of the "new discipline" of psychology. Novels by Lafayette, Defoe, Cleland, Heywood, Godwin and Austen, readings in philosophy and science, as well as art.—A.Schneider, T Th 11:40-12:55.  Prerequisites: Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date, time, and location that sign-up sheets go up is listed here: http://english.barnard.edu/sign-ups.  3 points

ENGL BC3176x or y The Romantic Era
Romantic writers in their intellectual, historical, and political context, with reference to contemporary movements in philosophy, music, and the plastic arts. Authors include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats. An emphasis on close reading of the poetry.—C. Plotkin, T Th 1:10-2:25.  3 points.

ENGL BC 3177y Victorian Age in Literature: the Novel
This course explores important works of long fiction from one of the most vibrant periods in the history of the novel. Beginning with Jane Austen, the most significant transitional figure from the preceding period, other authors include Gaskell, Dickens, Collins, C. Brontë, Eliot, Hardy, James. While attending to form and style, we will focus on the relation of these fictional worlds to the social realities of the time, and on how the novels reflect and challenge Victorian ideas about self and society, education, ambition and social class, femininity and desire, labor and domesticity.—M. Cregan, T Th 11:40-12:55.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 50 students. PLEASE NOTE that in the spring 14 semester, this will be an L-course--there will not be a departmental sign-up sheet for this class. Not offered in 2013-2014..  3 points

ENGL BC3179x American Literature to 1800
Early American histories, autobiographies, poems, plays, and novels tell stories of pilgrimage and colonization; private piety and public life; the growth of national identity; Puritanism, Quakerism, and Deism; courtship and marriage; slavery and abolition. Writers include Bradford, Shepard, Bradstreet, Taylor, Rowlandson, Edwards, Wheatley, Franklin, Woolman, and Brown.—L. Gordis, MW 10:10-11:25.  3 points

ENGL BC3180y American Literature, 1800-1870
Texts from the late Republican period through the Civil War explore the literary implications of American independence, the representation of Native Americans, the nature of the self, slavery and abolition, gender and woman's sphere, and the Civil War. Writers include Irving, Emerson, Poe, Fuller, Thoreau, Douglass, Stowe, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.—L. Gordis, MW 10:10-11:25.  3 points.

ENGL BC3183y American Literature since 1945
In the wake of World War II, the so-called American Century rises out of the ashes of fascism, haunted by the specter of bombs rendering victory and defeat indistinguishable. Unable to tolerate this postmodern condition, the United States plunges into an ideological civil war that is waged most dramatically in its literature since 1945. Authors include O'Connor, Ellison, Ginsberg, Doctorow, Nabokov, Pynchon, Robinson, Hejinian, Waldrop, Hass, Morrison, and DeLillo.—M. Vandenburg, T Th 2:40-3:55.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION AT FIRST CLASS.  3 points.

ENGL BC3185x Modern British and American Poetry
Poetry written in English during the past century, discussed in the context of modernism, postmodernism, literary theory, and changing social and technological developments. Students will participate in shaping the syllabus and leading class discussion. Authors may include Yeats, Williams, Eliot, Moore, Bishop, Rich, Ginsberg, Stevens, O' Hara, Plath, Brooks, Jordan, Walcott, Alexie, and many others.—W. Sharpe, T Th 2:40-3:55.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 35 students. Sign up through the Registrar's "L-course" process.

ENGL BC3188x or y The Modern Novel
Examines formal changes in the novel from nineteenth-century realism to stream of consciousness, montage, and other modernist innovations. Social and historical contexts include World War I, urbanization, sexuality and the family, empire and colonialism. Works of Henry James, E. M. Forster, Ford Madox Ford, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce.—M. Gordon, MW 11:40-12:55.  3 points.

ENGL BC3192x Exile and Estrangement in Global Literature
This course examines the experiential life of the novelist as both artist and citizen. Through a diverse selection of global novels and novellas, we will investigate the seemingly contradictory condition of the novelist as both outsider and integral to society, as both observer and expresser of society's yearnings and passions. We will look at how women and men, from different countries and epochs, have addressed the issues of social and political alienation, national crisis, and individual narrative voice. The main objective is to pinpoint, through close reading and open discussion, connections between novelistic form, national time and social conjuncture. The uniqueness of the novels we read lies not just in their articulation of a historical moment or in their response to national myth, but in their resistance to generalization. We will examine how our novelists' aesthetic figuration, as both witnesses and participants, creates an opportunity for fiction to reveal more than the author intends and, on the other hand, more than what power desires.—H. Matar, M 4:10-6.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.

ENGL BC3193x and y Critical Writing

(Formerly called Literary Criticism & Theory.) Provides experience in the reading and analysis of literary texts and some knowledge of conspicuous works of literary criticism. Frequent short papers. Required of all majors before the end of the junior year. Sophomores are encouraged to take it in the spring term even before officially declaring their major. Transfer students should plan to take BC3193 in the autumn term.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to Barnard students. Registration in each section is limited. Sign-up with the English Department is required. Registering for the course only through eBear will NOT ensure your enrollment. The date and time that sign-up sheets go up is listed on the English Dept.'s Announcements Page.

FALL

  1. C. Brown, Th 4:10-6
  2. M. Cregan, T 11-12:50
  3. S. Pedatella, W 2:10-4
  4. M. Spiegel, M 4:10-6
  5. T. Szell, T 4:10-6

SPRING

  1. K. Levin, T 9-10:50
  2. R. Hamilton, T 2:10-4
  3. L. Gordis, W 2:10-4
  4. W. Sharpe, Th 9-10:50


ENGL BC3194y (Section 2) Critical & Theoretical Perspectives on Literature: Literary Theory
Examines nineteenth century foundational texts (Marx, Freud, Nietzsche), landmarks of the twentieth century (Gramsci, Foucault, Deleuze, Butler, Jameson, Spillers, Said, Spivak, Anzaldua, Debray, Kelly, Rafael), the novels of Jose Rizal, and selected critical essays.—R. Hamilton, T 2:10-4.  3 points

ENGL BC3195x or y Modernism
Modernist responses to cultural fragmentation and gender anxiety in the wake of psychoanalysis and world war. Works by Woolf, Joyce, Yeats, Eliot, Stein, Hemingway, Toomer, H.D., Pound, Lawrence, Barnes, and other Anglo-American writers.—M. Vandenburg, T Th 2:40-3:55.  3 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 55 students. Sign up through the Registrar's "L-course" process.

ENGL BC3252x Contemporary Media Theory
Explores the transformation of social organization and consciousness by and as media technologies during the long 20th century. Students will read influential works of media analysis written during the past century, analyze film and digital media, and explore political and media theory generated since the rise of the internet.—J. Beller, M 11-12:50.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Attend first class for instructor permission. Registering for the course only through eBear or SSOL will NOT ensure your enrollment.

ENRE BC3810y Literary Approaches to the Bible
Interpretive strategies for reading the Bible as a work with literary dimensions. Considerations of poetic and rhetorical structures, narrative techniques, and feminist exegesis will be included. Topics for investigation include the influence of the Bible on literature.—M. Ellsberg, T 2:10-4.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. PLEASE NOTE that in spring 13 semester, this will be an L-course--there will not be a departmental sign-up sheet for this class.

ENGL BC 3993y The Worlds of Shange
This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the work of Ntozake Shange. A poet, performance artist, playwright and novelist, Shange's stylistic innovations in drama, poetry and fiction and attention to the untold lives of black women have made her an influential figure throughout American arts. We will examine Shange's work in a range of political/artistic contexts (the Black Arts Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, Black Feminisms and Second Wave Feminism) and from multidisciplinary perspectives. Texts will include Shange's for colored girls who have considered suicide when the rainbow is enuf; If I can cook, you know God can; Liliane; Sassafrass, Cyprus and Indigo; Spell#7 and The Love Space Demands. These works will be partnered with significant related texts such as Adrienne Kennedy's Funny House of a Negro and Michelle Wallace, Black Macho and the Myth of the Superwoman.—K. Hall, W 2:10-4.  Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required. Interested students should complete this form: http://bit.ly/1aCNoQW Students should have taken a course beyond the intro level from ONE of the following areas: American Literature (through the English Department), Africana Studies, American Studies, Theatre or Women's Studies..  4 points.

CLEN W3995x Reading Lacan (G6995 for Graduate level)
An intensive reading of selections from Lacan's Seminar VI: Desire and Its Interpretation with Shakespeare's Hamlet; Seminar VII: The Ethics of Psychoanalysis with Sophocles's Antigone; Seminar VIII: The Transference with Plato's Symposium; and Seminar XX: Encore: On Feminine Sexuality: The Limits of Love and Knowledge with Clarice Lispector and Marguerite Duras. Emphasis on the relevance of Lacan's thought to contemporary literature, culture, and neuroscience, and to questions about happiness, democracy, and peace.—M. Jaanus T 2:10-4:00pm.  3 points.

ENGL BC3996x and y Special Project in Theatre, Writing, or Critical Interpretation
Senior majors who are concentrating in Theatre or Writing and have completed two courses in writing or three in theatre will normally take the Special Project in Theatre or Writing (ENGL BC 3996 x or y) in combination with an additional course in their special field. This counts in place of one of the Senior Seminars. In certain cases, Independent Study (ENGL BC 3999 - see below) may be substituted for the Special Project.  1 point.  Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and chair required. In rare cases, with the permission of the chair, a special project in conjunction with a course may be taken by other English majors.

ENGL BC3997x (Section 1) Senior Seminars: Human and Other Animal Identities in Literature and Philosophy
An interdisciplinary study of the construction of animal identities in selected literary and philosophical texts and of the ways in which such representations of non-human animal identities inform conceptions of human identities, including racialized and gendered ones.—T. Szell W 4:10-6:00pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

ENGL BC3997x (Section 2) Senior Seminars: John Donne and Friends
The course will devoted to one of the greatest writers of love poetry and devotional poetry, John Donne His intense, witty writing has had a long afterlife, influencing writers from George Herbert and John Suckling (in the seventeenth century) to Coleridge in the nineteenth) to T.S. Eliot, Elizabeth Bishop, Anthony Hecht, and A. S. Byatt (in the twentieth). We will read Donne's poetry (The Songs and Sonets, and Holy Sonnets and other poems)-his exploration of sex and love, death and God, doubt and faith-- but also his later Devotions, his prose meditations on his near-fatal sickness, a text still relevant as he struggles to understand the physical, psychological, and spiritual aspects of illness. We also will read "friends" of Donne-other writers who have been influenced by Donne, and whose writing is in conversation with him. Among those we might read are: George Herbert (along with Donne, the best seventeenth-century writer of religious lyrics), other seventeenth-century poets taken by Donne's erotic poetry (Suckling, Rochester, both of whom tend towards the obscene), a few poems by Elizabeth Bishop, Anthony Hecht, and Robert Hass, late twentieth-century plays Wallace Shawn (The Designated Mourner) and Margaret Edson (Wit)--plays that "stage" Donne in different ways); A. S. Byatt's novel Possession. We can't cover all these in the senior seminar, but this list gives an idea of the rich possibilities of the topic. The course aims to get students to understand Donne's poetry, and have a sense of how later writers have understood Donne and been in conversation with him.—A Guibbory T 11:00-12:50pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

ENGL BC3997x (Section 3) Senior Seminars: Revolution in Literature and Theory
Our question: how are revolutions -political, social - anticipated or reflected in literature and theory? In the Renaissance, the word revolution describes the turning of fortune's wheel, the changing seasons, a natural process: after winter, spring will come again. But the great social upheavals of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries gave the term its modern meaning, that of a cataclysmic rupture in the political world, and its transformation: a new way of being. A second question: is this true? As Giuseppe di Lampedusa writes in his great novel The Leopard"everything needs to change, so everything can stay the same." Wordsworth, Goya, Zola, Lampedusa, Eisenstein, Wertmuller, Arenas; Marx, Lenin, Adorno, Gramsci.—R. Hamilton T 4:10-6:00pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

ENGL BC3997x (Section 4) Senior Seminars:
"The empty spirit / In vacant space": gothicism, transcendentalism, and postmodern rapture. Traces of the sublime in the American literary landscape, featuring Poe, Melville, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Stevens, Bishop, Reed, Pynchon, Robinson, and Harding. –M. Vandenburg, Th 4:10-6

ENGL BC3997x (Section 5) Senior Seminars: Late Victorian and Modern Drama
Drama in transition. Changing social structures and dramatic structures at the turn of the century. The relationship between convention and invention and the interface of text and performance in the plays of Pinero, Wilde, Shaw, Strindberg, Ibsen, Chekhov, Robins, and others.—P. Denison W 11:00-12:50pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.

ENGL BC3997x (Section 6) Senior Seminar: Utopia, from Thomas More to Ursula LeGuin
A look at Thomas More's Utopia and then at the dreams or nightmares it inspired, whether hopeful, ironic, serious, parodic, speculative, nightmarish, or interrogatory. Authors include More, Campanella, Rabelais, Bacon, Margaret Cavendish, Morris, Bellamy, Wells, Orwell, Ursula LeGuin and, if there is time, R.A. Lafferty's scifi novel starring More and some young adult fiction by Lois Lowry.—A. Prescott M 2:10-4:00pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors

ENGL BC3998y (Section 1) Senior Seminars: Studies in Literature: Freud and Literature
The seminar will pay particular attention to what Freud wrote about art, artists, phantasy, sublimation, and dreams in relations to his central focus on the unconscious, sexuality, delusion, group psychology, war, and civilization. While reading Freud, you will begin thinking, and writing about a literary text of your own choosing on which to test your new psychoanalytic knowledge.—M. Jaanus T 11:00-12:50pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors

ENGL BC3998y (Section 2) Senior Seminars: The Family in Fiction & Film: The Poetics of Growing Up
Looking closely at late Twentieth and Twenty-First Century stories, novels, memoir and films that center on the logic, dysfunction, romance, system, morphing, divorcing and curious maturation of the family. From Alison Bechdel's graphic novel, Fun Home, to the Korean film, The Host, we will explore fresh and a few classic cinematic takes on this theme. We will explore renderings of "family cultures," family feeling, family values, the family as a narrative configuration, and home as a utopian space, a nightmarish landscape, a memory palace and more. Authors and directors will include: Wes Anderson, Gaston Bachelard, Mira Bartok, Alison Bechdel, Joon-ho Bong, Jonathan Franzen, Vivien Gornick, Lasse Hallstrom, Tamara Jenkins, Ang Lee, Mike Leigh, Jim, Sheridan, Todd Solondz, Francois Truffaut, Tennessee Williams, D. W. Winnicott, Andrei Zvyagintsev.—M. Spiegel, T 4:10-6:00pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English Film majors. Priority given to Barnard Film majors and English majors with a Film concentration.

ENGL BC3998y (Section 3) Senior Seminars: Studies in Literature: Modernism in the Making
It is customary to think of modernism as a revolt against "the Victorians."  Modernists themselves are our authority for this view.  This course will examine both the revolutions in form and thought that mark the period and the deep continuities that run from the mid-nineteenth into the first third of the twentieth century.  The first half of the term will be taken up with major texts of the period in various genres; in the second, texts proposed by seminar members will form the focus of discussion.—C. Plotkin, R 4:10-6:00pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors

ENGL BC3998y (Section 4) Charles Dickens
Charles Dickens: the life, the works, the legend, in as much detail as we can manage in one semester. Reading will include Pickwick Papers, A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield, Bleak House, and selections from his friend John Forster's Life of Charles Dickens, as well as other works to be chosen by the class. Special emphasis will be given to Dickens's literary style and genius for characterization, in the context of Victorian concerns about money, class, gender, and the role of art in an industrializing society. Students will be expected to share in creating the syllabus, presenting new material, and leading class discussion. Be prepared to do a LOT of reading--all of it great!--plus weekly writing on Courseworks.—W. Sharpe, R 2:10-4:00pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors

ENGL BC3998y (Section 5) Senior Seminars: Short Fiction by American Writers
We will explore the rich variety of fiction in shorter forms--short stories and novellas--written by American women. Writers to be studied will include Porter, Stafford, Welty, O'Connor, Olsen, Paley.—M. Gordon, T 6:10-8:00pm.  4 points.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors

ENGL BC3998y (Section 6) Senior Seminars: Studies in Literature: The Making and Unmaking of the Poetic Canon
This seminar reviews the emergence of poetry anthologies from the 18th century to the present, while sampling a wide variety of lyric poetry (Renaissance and Romantic to Modernist and Contemporary) and re-examining such issues as what it is we value in poetry and how we might reinvent the "canon" we have inherited. Students will create their own anthologies and have the option to do editorial or critical projects for their final submissions.—J. Basker, M 2:10-4:00pm.  Prerequisites: Sign up through special tab in eBear. Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors

 
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