Fall 2019 Senior Seminar Information

An FAQ about the senior seminar enrollment process is below.  Please read through all the questions carefully.  If you have a question about the process that's not answered by the FAQ, please email Sarah Pasadino at spasadin@barnard.edu. 

Jump to a specific question:
1. What are the fall senior seminar classes?
2. What are the enrollment caps for senior seminars?
3. When can I sign up for a senior seminar?
4. Who is eligible to take a senior seminar?
5. What should I do if I have problems with the computer system when signing up for a senior seminar?
6. What should I do if I am a first-semester junior who needs to take a senior seminar early?
7. Is it possible for me to take the Film/English senior seminar if I am not a Film Studies major or film concentrator?
8. What should I do if I cannot get into my preferred senior seminar section?
9. What should I do if I have a required course to take next semester that I cannot move, but all the senior seminars that do not conflict with its time slot are full?
10. What should I do if absolutely all senior seminar sections have filled up before I could register for one?

 

1. What are the fall senior seminar classes?

They are:

ENGL BC3918 Senior Seminar: Late Victorian and Modern Drama
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
Drama in a period of rapid transition.  The interaction of changing social structures and performative traditions. Protest plays, problem plays, and plays pursuing new social and aesthetic possibilities vie for attention and authority. Our seminar will explore fluid relationships between realism and theatricalism, historicism and modernism, convention and invention, adaptation and interpretation.  We will read texts, view films and stage adaptations, and attend NYC productions.  Playwrights may include Dion Boucicault, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Colin Hazelwood/ Mary Bratton, Arthur Wing Pinero, Patrick Marber, Elizabeth Robins, Evelyn Glover, Lillian Hellman, Oscar Wilde, Theresa Rebeck, George Bernard Shaw, Henrik Ibsen, Anton Chekhov, Caryl Churchill, Noel Coward, and Emma Rice.
—P. Denison, W 11-12:50

ENGL BC3919 Senior Seminar: Virginia Woolf
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
We will read all eight novels of Virginia Woolf, as well as A Room of One's Own and Three Guineas and selections from her diaries and criticism.
—M. Gordon, T 2:10-4

ENGL BC3920 Senior Seminar: Migration, Immigration, and the Borders of American Literature
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
This course will explore representations of voluntary and forced migration as a path toward understanding the formation of literary traditions and histories in the US and the Americas. How do we think about immigrant literature if the immigrant was here before the literature? Where does American literature begin and end if a mobile subject carries her words across borders and genres?  In addition to reading fictional and non-fictional narratives of cultural literacy and migration by writers like Frederick Douglass, Julia Alvarez, and Valeria Luiselli, we’ll examine the ways in which contemporary discourses of relocation generate surprising returns to what we might recognize as the proto-exceptionalist and/or post-apocalyptic foundations of American literature and culture.
—K. Carter, T 10:10-12

ENGL BC3926 Senior Seminar: Tradition and Nonconformity: Marlowe, Shakespeare, Woolf, Borges, and Baldwin
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
How does a literary lineage develop by challenging its own perceived norms? How can tradition itself be, in other words, unconventional? Focusing on the work of Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, Virginia Woolf, Jorge Luis Borges, and James Baldwin, we will study texts that suggest the complexity of each author's engagement with his or her literary inheritances.
—R. Eisendrath, R 4:10-6

ENGL BC3927 Senior Seminar: "a d—d mob of scribbling women": Nineteenth-century American Women Writers
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
(Formerly ENGL BC3997.06; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.)  In 1855, Nathaniel Hawthorne complained that American publishing was "wholly given over to a d--d mob of scribbling women," and that he could not hope to compete with women writers for popularity or sales.  Yet Hawthorne's texts were canonized as American classics, while texts by nineteenth-century women writers were largely ignored by the academy until late in the twentieth century.  This course considers a variety of texts by nineteenth-century American women, including novels, short fiction, poetry, and journalism. We'll consider women's writing and women's reading through a variety of lenses, including domesticity and women's sphere, political action and suffrage, slavery and abolition, the economics of writing and publishing, sentimentality and anger, and canon formation and literary merit.  Authors include Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Susan Warner, Fanny Fern, Harriet Jacobs, Elizabeth Drew Stoddard, Louisa May Alcott, Emily Dickinson, Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins, Nellie Bly, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman.
—L. Gordis, R 2:10-4

ENGL BC3936 Senior Seminar: The Novel and Economic Justice
Enrollment limited to Barnard senior English majors.
The industrial revolution inspired novelists to explore the ways in which money, or the lack of it, forms or deforms our characters. It also inspired the writings of Karl Marx, the great theorist of economic justice. In this seminar we will read five of the greatest nineteenth-century novels – Godwin’s Caleb Williams, Austen’s Persuasion, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, Eliot’s Middlemarch and Hardy’s Jude the Obscure – alongside Marx’s most influential writings. We will pay special attention to Marxist notions of materialism; alienation and human flourishing; capital and labour; classes; and ideology. Special emphasis will also be given to the Marxist approach in the study of culture, the role of intellectuals (such as ourselves) and the relationship between capitalism and culture – through theorists like Gramsci, the Frankfurt School, and Raymond Williams.
—R. Hamilton, R 11-12:50

 

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2. What are the enrollment caps for senior seminars?

They are all capped at 10 students.

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3. When can I sign up for a senior seminar?

You can sign up as soon as registration opens for you.

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4. Who is eligible to take a senior seminar?

That depends on the senior seminar.

You must meet the following requirements on myBarnard:

  1. Your major is listed as English (you may have any concentration).
  2. Your expected graduation date is listed as February 2020 or May 2020.

If you do not meet these requirements, the computer system will not allow you to sign-up for these courses.  It is therefore extremely important that you check that your major, concentration, and graduation year are correct on myBarnard BEFORE registration opens.

If this information is incorrect, please contact both Sarah Pasadino and the Registrar ASAP to correct it.  Please note that if you wait until after registration opens to correct this information, you will not be able to register for senior seminars until this information is corrected in the registration system.

If you do not fulfill these requirements but have extenuating circumstances that require you to take a senior seminar, please see question 6.

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5. What should I do if I have problems with the computer system when signing up for a senior seminar?

First, check to see if your major and expected graduation date is correct on myBarnard for the seminar you are trying to register for.  If they are and you still cannot register, please email spasadin@barnard.edu with a description (and, if possible, a screenshot) of your issue.

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6. What should I do if I am a first-semester junior who needs to take a senior seminar early (because I am studying abroad my senior year, etc.)?

Before registration opens up, please email spasadin@barnard.edu a short explanation of why you need to take your senior seminar early and cc your major adviser.

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7. Is it possible for me to take the Film/English senior seminar if I am not a Film Studies major or film concentrator?

There is no Film/English senior seminar in fall 2019.

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8. What should I do if I cannot get into my preferred senior seminar section?

Please sign up for one of the other senior seminars to ensure that you definitely have a senior seminar to take.  Then join the electronic waiting list for your preferred section.

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9. What should I do if I have a required course to take next semester that I cannot move, but all the senior seminars that do not conflict with its time slot are full?

Please join the electronic wait list for the seminar(s) that works for your schedule.  Then email spasadin@barnard.edu a short explanation of your scheduling conflict and cc your major adviser.  Rio will work with you and your adviser to resolve the problem.

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10. What should I do if absolutely all senior seminar sections have filled up before I could register for one?

Please join the electronic wait list for the seminar(s) that works for your schedule.  Then email spasadin@barnard.edu to let her know about your issue and cc your major adviser.  Rio will work with you and your adviser to place you in a senior seminar.

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